1865

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1865 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1865
MDCCCLXV
Ab urbe condita 2618
Armenian calendar 1314
ԹՎ ՌՅԺԴ
Assyrian calendar 6615
Baháʼí calendar 21–22
Balinese saka calendar 1786–1787
Bengali calendar 1272
Berber calendar 2815
British Regnal year 28  Vict. 1   29  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2409
Burmese calendar 1227
Byzantine calendar 7373–7374
Chinese calendar 甲子(Wood  Rat)
4561 or 4501
     to 
乙丑年 (Wood  Ox)
4562 or 4502
Coptic calendar 1581–1582
Discordian calendar 3031
Ethiopian calendar 1857–1858
Hebrew calendar 5625–5626
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1921–1922
 - Shaka Samvat 1786–1787
 - Kali Yuga 4965–4966
Holocene calendar 11865
Igbo calendar 865–866
Iranian calendar 1243–1244
Islamic calendar 1281–1282
Japanese calendar Genji 2 / Keiō 1
(慶応元年)
Javanese calendar 1793–1794
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4198
Minguo calendar 47 before ROC
民前47年
Nanakshahi calendar 397
Thai solar calendar 2407–2408
Tibetan calendar 阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1991 or 1610 or 838
     to 
阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1992 or 1611 or 839

1865 (MDCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1865th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 865th year of the 2nd millennium, the 65th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1865, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 15: Union captures Fort Fisher. Battle of Fort Fisher.jpg
January 15: Union captures Fort Fisher.

AprilJune

April 2: Jefferson Davis. Jefferson Davis - Project Gutenberg eText 15393.jpg
April 2: Jefferson Davis.
April 9: Appomattox Court House. Appomattox courthouse.jpg
April 9: Appomattox Court House.
April 14: Lincoln shot. Lincoln assassination slide c1900 - Restoration.jpg
April 14: Lincoln shot.
July 2: Salvation Army Standard of the Salvation Army.svg
July 2: Salvation Army

JulySeptember

July 14: Matterhorn climbed. Matterhorn.jpg
July 14: Matterhorn climbed.
July 30: Steamer Brother Jonathan sinks. SS Brother Jonathan 1862.jpg
July 30: Steamer Brother Jonathan sinks.

OctoberDecember

Francis Galton. Francis Galton2.jpg
Francis Galton.

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

Elma Danielsson Elma Danielsson.jpg
Elma Danielsson

AprilJune

Pieter Zeeman Pieter Zeeman.jpg
Pieter Zeeman
King George V of the United Kingdom GeorgeV Royal Victorian Chain.jpg
King George V of the United Kingdom

JulySeptember

Philipp Scheidemann Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1979-122-29A, Philipp Scheidemann.jpg
Philipp Scheidemann
Julia Marlowe Julia Marlowe photograph (cropped).jpg
Julia Marlowe

OctoberDecember

Charles W. Clark Charles W. Clark 2.jpg
Charles W. Clark
Hovhannes Abelian Hovhannes Harutyuni Abelian.jpg
Hovhannes Abelian
Warren G. Harding Warren G Harding-Harris & Ewing.jpg
Warren G. Harding
Jean Sibelius Jean Sibelius, 1913.jpg
Jean Sibelius
Rudyard Kipling Rudyard Kipling (portrait).jpg
Rudyard Kipling

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln November 1863.jpg
Abraham Lincoln
John Wilkes Booth John Wilkes Booth-portrait.jpg
John Wilkes Booth

JulyDecember

Paul Bogle PaulBogle-MorantBay.jpg
Paul Bogle
Henry John Temple Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston.jpg
Henry John Temple
Leopold I of Belgium Leopold I of Belgium (2).jpg
Leopold I of Belgium

Related Research Articles

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Confederate States of America Unrecognized state in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865

The Confederate States of America (CSA), commonly referred to as the Confederate States or simply the Confederacy, was an unrecognized herrenvolk republic in North America that existed from February 8, 1861, to May 9, 1865. The Confederacy comprised U.S. states that declared secession and warred against the United States during the ensuing American Civil War. Eleven U.S. states declared secession from the Union and formed the main part of the CSA. They were South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Kentucky and Missouri also had declarations of secession and full representation in the Confederate Congress during their Union army occupation.

Jefferson Davis President of the Confederate States

Jefferson Finis Davis was an American politician who served as the president of the Confederate States from 1861 to 1865. As a member of the Democratic Party, he represented Mississippi in the United States Senate and the House of Representatives before the American Civil War. He previously served as the United States Secretary of War from 1853 to 1857 under President Franklin Pierce.

1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1863rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 863rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1863, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1861st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 861st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1861, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1870 Calendar year

1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1870th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 870th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1870, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1877 Calendar year

1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1877th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 877th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1877, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1860 (MDCCCLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1860th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 860th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1860, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1862 (MDCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1862nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 862nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1862, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Military leadership in the American Civil War was influenced by professional military education and the hard-earned pragmatism of command experience. While not all leaders had formal military training, the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis created dedicated cadres of professional officers whose understanding of military science had profound effect on the conduct of the American Civil War and whose lasting legacy helped forge the traditions of the modern U.S. officer corps of all service branches.

Richmond in the American Civil War History of Richmond, Virginia during the American Civil War

Richmond, Virginia served as the capital of the Confederate States of America for almost the whole of the American Civil War. It was a vital source of weapons and supplies for the war effort, and the terminus of five railroads.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the American Civil War:

Events from the year 1861 in the United States. This year marked the beginning of the American Civil War.

Events from the year 1862 in the United States.

Events from the year 1863 in the United States.

Events from the year 1864 in the United States.

Events from the year 1865 in the United States. The American Civil War ends with the surrender of the Confederate States, beginning the Reconstruction era of U.S. history.

Events from the year 1807 in the United States.

Events from the year 1809 in the United States.

1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1864th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 864th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1864, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

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