1865

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1865 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1865
MDCCCLXV
Ab urbe condita 2618
Armenian calendar 1314
ԹՎ ՌՅԺԴ
Assyrian calendar 6615
Baháʼí calendar 21–22
Balinese saka calendar 1786–1787
Bengali calendar 1272
Berber calendar 2815
British Regnal year 28  Vict. 1   29  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2409
Burmese calendar 1227
Byzantine calendar 7373–7374
Chinese calendar 甲子年 (Wood  Rat)
4562 or 4355
     to 
乙丑年 (Wood  Ox)
4563 or 4356
Coptic calendar 1581–1582
Discordian calendar 3031
Ethiopian calendar 1857–1858
Hebrew calendar 5625–5626
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1921–1922
 - Shaka Samvat 1786–1787
 - Kali Yuga 4965–4966
Holocene calendar 11865
Igbo calendar 865–866
Iranian calendar 1243–1244
Islamic calendar 1281–1282
Japanese calendar Genji 2 / Keiō 1
(慶応元年)
Javanese calendar 1793–1794
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4198
Minguo calendar 47 before ROC
民前47年
Nanakshahi calendar 397
Thai solar calendar 2407–2408
Tibetan calendar 阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1991 or 1610 or 838
     to 
阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1992 or 1611 or 839

1865 (MDCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1865th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 865th year of the 2nd millennium, the 65th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1865, the Gregorian calendar was 12days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 15: Union captures Fort Fisher. Battle of Fort Fisher.jpg
January 15: Union captures Fort Fisher.

AprilJune

April 2: Jefferson Davis. Jefferson Davis - Project Gutenberg eText 15393.jpg
April 2: Jefferson Davis.
April 9: Appomattox Court House. Appomattox courthouse.jpg
April 9: Appomattox Court House.
April 14: Lincoln shot. Lincoln assassination slide c1900 - Restoration.jpg
April 14: Lincoln shot.
July 2: Salvation Army Standard of the Salvation Army.svg
July 2: Salvation Army

JulySeptember

July 14: Matterhorn climbed. Matterhorn.jpg
July 14: Matterhorn climbed.
July 30: Steamer Brother Jonathan sinks. SS Brother Jonathan 1862.jpg
July 30: Steamer Brother Jonathan sinks.

OctoberDecember

Francis Galton. Francis Galton2.jpg
Francis Galton.

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

Elma Danielsson Elma Danielsson.jpg
Elma Danielsson

AprilJune

Pieter Zeeman Pieter Zeeman.jpg
Pieter Zeeman
King George V of the United Kingdom GeorgeV Royal Victorian Chain.jpg
King George V of the United Kingdom

JulySeptember

Philipp Scheidemann Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1979-122-29A, Philipp Scheidemann.jpg
Philipp Scheidemann
Julia Marlowe Julia Marlowe photograph (cropped).jpg
Julia Marlowe

OctoberDecember

Charles W. Clark Charles W. Clark 2.jpg
Charles W. Clark
Hovhannes Abelian Hovhannes Harutyuni Abelian.jpg
Hovhannes Abelian
Warren G. Harding Warren G Harding-Harris & Ewing.jpg
Warren G. Harding
Jean Sibelius Jean Sibelius, 1913.jpg
Jean Sibelius
Rudyard Kipling Rudyard Kipling (portrait).jpg
Rudyard Kipling

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln November 1863.jpg
Abraham Lincoln
John Wilkes Booth John Wilkes Booth-portrait.jpg
John Wilkes Booth

JulyDecember

Paul Bogle PaulBogle-MorantBay.jpg
Paul Bogle
Henry John Temple Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston.jpg
Henry John Temple
Leopold I of Belgium Leopold I of Belgium (2).jpg
Leopold I of Belgium

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">American Civil War</span> 1861–1865 conflict in the United States

The American Civil War was a civil war in the United States between the Union and the Confederacy. The Confederacy had been formed by states that had seceded from the Union.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Confederate States of America</span> Unrecognized state in North America (1861–1865)

The Confederate States of America (CSA), commonly referred to as the Confederate States (C.S.), the Confederacy, or the South, was an unrecognized breakaway republic in the Southern United States that existed from February 8, 1861, to May 9, 1865. The Confederacy comprised eleven U.S. states that declared secession and warred against the United States during the American Civil War. The states were South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina.

1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1863rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 863rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1863, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1861st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 861st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1861, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1877</span> Calendar year

1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1877th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 877th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1877, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1862 (MDCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1862nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 862nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1862, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1832</span> Calendar year

1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1832nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 832nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 32nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1832, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Confederate States Army</span> Southern army in the American Civil War

The Confederate States Army, also called the Confederate Army or the Southern Army, was the military land force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–1865), fighting against the United States forces to win the independence of the Southern states and uphold and expand the institution of slavery. On February 28, 1861, the Provisional Confederate Congress established a provisional volunteer army and gave control over military operations and authority for mustering state forces and volunteers to the newly chosen Confederate president, Jefferson Davis. Davis was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, and colonel of a volunteer regiment during the Mexican–American War. He had also been a United States senator from Mississippi and U.S. Secretary of War under President Franklin Pierce. On March 1, 1861, on behalf of the Confederate government, Davis assumed control of the military situation at Charleston, South Carolina, where South Carolina state militia besieged Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, held by a small U.S. Army garrison. By March 1861, the Provisional Confederate Congress expanded the provisional forces and established a more permanent Confederate States Army.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Border states (American Civil War)</span> Slave states that did not secede from the Union during the American Civil War

In the American Civil War (1861–65), the border states or the Border South were four, later five, slave states in the Upper South that primarily supported the Union. They were Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, and after 1863, the new state of West Virginia. To their north they bordered free states of the Union, and all but Delaware bordered slave states of the Confederacy to their south.

Events from the year 1830 in the United States.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">West Virginia in the American Civil War</span> Origin of West Virginia; during the U.S. Civil War

The U.S. state of West Virginia was formed out of western Virginia and added to the Union as a direct result of the American Civil War, in which it became the only modern state to have declared its independence from the Confederacy. In the summer of 1861, Union troops, which included a number of newly formed Western Virginia regiments, under General George McClellan drove off Confederate troops under General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Philippi in Barbour County. This essentially freed Unionists in the northwestern counties of Virginia to form a functioning government of their own as a result of the Wheeling Convention. Before the admission of West Virginia as a state, the government in Wheeling formally claimed jurisdiction over all of Virginia, although from its creation it was firmly committed to the formation of a separate state.

Military leadership in the American Civil War was vested in both the political and the military structures of the belligerent powers. The overall military leadership of the United States during the Civil War was ultimately vested in the President of the United States as constitutional commander-in-chief, and in the political heads of the military departments he appointed. Most of the major Union wartime commanders had, however, previous regular army experience. A smaller number of military leaders originated from the United States Volunteers. Some of them derived from nations other than the United States.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Virginia in the American Civil War</span>

The American state of Virginia became a prominent part of the Confederacy when it joined during the American Civil War. As a Southern slave-holding state, Virginia held the state convention to deal with the secession crisis and voted against secession on April 4, 1861. Opinion shifted after the Battle of Fort Sumter on April 12, and April 15, when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln called for troops from all states still in the Union to put down the rebellion. For all practical purposes, Virginia joined the Confederacy on April 17, though secession was not officially ratified until May 23. A Unionist government was established in Wheeling and the new state of West Virginia was created by an act of Congress from 50 counties of western Virginia, making it the only state to lose territory as a consequence of the war. Unionism was indeed strong also in other parts of the State, and during the war the Restored Government of Virginia was created as rival to the Confederate Government of Virginia, making it one of the states to have 2 governments during the Civil War.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Conclusion of the American Civil War</span> Ceasefire Agreement of the Confederacy

The conclusion of the American Civil War commenced with the articles of surrender agreement of the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, at Appomattox Court House, by General Robert E. Lee and concluded with the surrender of the CSS Shenandoah on November 6, 1865, bringing the hostilities of the American Civil War to a close. Legally, the war did not end until a proclamation by President Andrew Johnson on August 20, 1866, when he declared "that the said insurrection is at an end and that peace, order, tranquillity, and civil authority now exist in and throughout the whole of the United States of America."

Events from the year 1861 in the United States. This year marked the beginning of the American Civil War.

Events from the year 1862 in the United States.

Events from the year 1863 in the United States.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1864 in the United States</span> List of events

Events from the year 1864 in the United States.

Events from the year 1865 in the United States. The American Civil War ends with the surrender of the Confederate States, beginning the Reconstruction era of U.S. history.

1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1864th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 864th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1864, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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