1868

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1868 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1868
MDCCCLXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2621
Armenian calendar 1317
ԹՎ ՌՅԺԷ
Assyrian calendar 6618
Bahá'í calendar 24–25
Balinese saka calendar 1789–1790
Bengali calendar 1275
Berber calendar 2818
British Regnal year 31  Vict. 1   32  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2412
Burmese calendar 1230
Byzantine calendar 7376–7377
Chinese calendar 丁卯(Fire  Rabbit)
4564 or 4504
     to 
戊辰年 (Earth  Dragon)
4565 or 4505
Coptic calendar 1584–1585
Discordian calendar 3034
Ethiopian calendar 1860–1861
Hebrew calendar 5628–5629
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1924–1925
 - Shaka Samvat 1789–1790
 - Kali Yuga 4968–4969
Holocene calendar 11868
Igbo calendar 868–869
Iranian calendar 1246–1247
Islamic calendar 1284–1285
Japanese calendar Keiō 4 / Meiji 1
(明治元年)
Javanese calendar 1796–1797
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4201
Minguo calendar 44 before ROC
民前44年
Nanakshahi calendar 400
Thai solar calendar 2410–2411
Tibetan calendar 阴火兔年
(female Fire-Rabbit)
1994 or 1613 or 841
     to 
阳土龙年
(male Earth-Dragon)
1995 or 1614 or 842

1868 ( MDCCCLXVIII ) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar , the 1868th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 868th year of the 2nd millennium , the 68th year of the 19th century , and the 9th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1868, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Wednesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are ED, such as the years 1908, 1936, 1964, 1992, 2020, 2048, 2076, and 2116 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2004 and 2032 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in March and November. Common years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another in February.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 3: Emperor Meiji. Meiji Emperor.jpg
January 3: Emperor Meiji.

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 363 days remaining until the end of the year.

British Expedition to Abyssinia 1867-1868 war between the British and Ethiopian Empires

The British Expedition to Abyssinia was a rescue mission and punitive expedition carried out in 1868 by the armed forces of the British Empire against the Ethiopian Empire. Emperor Tewodros II of Ethiopia, then often referred to by the anglicized name Theodore, imprisoned several missionaries and two representatives of the British government in an attempt to get the attention of the British government, which had decided against his requests for military assistance. The punitive expedition launched by the British in response required the transportation of a sizable military force hundreds of miles across mountainous terrain lacking any road system. The formidable obstacles to the action were overcome by the commander of the expedition, General Sir Robert Napier, who was victorious in every battle with the troops of Tewodros, captured the Ethiopian capital and rescued all the hostages. The expedition was widely hailed on its return for achieving all its objectives.

Robert Napier, 1st Baron Napier of Magdala British Indian Army officer

Field Marshal Robert Cornelius Napier, 1st Baron Napier of Magdala was an Indian Army officer. He fought in the First Anglo-Sikh War and the Second Anglo-Sikh War before seeing action as chief engineer during the second relief of Lucknow in March 1858 during the Indian Rebellion of 1857. He also served in the Second Opium War as commander of the 2nd division of the expeditionary force which took part in the Battle of Taku Forts, the surrender of Peking's Anting Gate and the entry to Peking in 1860. He subsequently led the punitive expedition to Abyssinia July 1867, defeating the Emperor Tewodros II of Ethiopia with minimal loss of life among his own forces and rescuing the hostages of Tewodros.

AprilJune

April 1 is the 91st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 274 days remaining until the end of the year.

Hampton University historically black university in Virginia

Hampton University (HU) is a private historically black university in Hampton, Virginia. It was founded in 1868 by black and white leaders of the American Missionary Association after the American Civil War to provide education to freedmen. It is home to the Hampton University Museum, which is the oldest museum of the African diaspora in the United States, and the oldest museum in the state of Virginia. In 1878, it established a program for teaching Native Americans that lasted until 1923.

Hampton, Virginia Independent city in Virginia

Hampton is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 137,436.

JulySeptember

July 25: Wyoming Territory. Grand Tetons11.jpg
July 25: Wyoming Territory.

OctoberDecember

November 27: Battle of Washita River. The Seventh U. S. Cavalry charging in Black Kettle's village at daylight (Battle of Washita).jpg
November 27: Battle of Washita River.

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

Felix Hoffmann Felix Hoffman.jpg
Felix Hoffmann
Countess Markiewicz Countess Markiewicz.jpg
Countess Markiewicz

AprilJune

Nicholas II of Russia Face Nicholas II.jpg
Nicholas II of Russia
John L. Hines John L. Hines.jpg
John L. Hines
Robert Falcon Scott Scott of the Antarctic crop.jpg
Robert Falcon Scott
Karl Landsteiner Karl Landsteiner nobel.jpg
Karl Landsteiner
Miklos Horthy Horthy the regent.jpg
Miklós Horthy

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

John Nance Garner JohnNanceGarner.png
John Nance Garner
Mary Brewster Hazelton Mary Brewster Hazelton, est 1900-1910.png
Mary Brewster Hazelton
Arturo Alessandri Alessandri Ulk (1932).jpg
Arturo Alessandri
Fritz Haber Fritz Haber.png
Fritz Haber

Unknown date

Deaths

JanuaryJune

John Crawfurd John Crawfurd.jpg
John Crawfurd

JulyDecember

Gioachino Rossini Rossini c. 1850-litho-F Perrin.jpeg
Gioachino Rossini
Adah Isaacs Menken Adah Isaacs Menken, age 19, 1854-55.jpg
Adah Isaacs Menken
Mongkut King Mongkut of Siam.jpg
Mongkut

Related Research Articles

1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1918th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 918th year of the 2nd millennium, the 18th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1918, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1957th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 957th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1950s decade.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. A key event of this year was the sinking of the infamous RMS Titanic

The 1860s was the ten-year period from the years 1860 to 1869.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1941st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 941st year of the 2nd millennium, the 41st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1940s decade.

1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1915th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 915th year of the 2nd millennium, the 15th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1915, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1890th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 890th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1890, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1875th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 875th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1875, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1871st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 871st year of the 2nd millennium, the 71st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1871, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1870th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 870th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1870, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1867th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 867th year of the 2nd millennium, the 67th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1867, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1869 (MDCCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1869th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 869th year of the 2nd millennium, the 69th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1869, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1792 Year

1792 (MDCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1792nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 792nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1792, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1878th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 878th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1878, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1853 (MDCCCLIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1853rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 853rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1853, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

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