1871

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1871 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1871
MDCCCLXXI
French Republican calendar 79
Ab urbe condita 2624
Armenian calendar 1320
ԹՎ ՌՅԻ
Assyrian calendar 6621
Bahá'í calendar 27–28
Balinese saka calendar 1792–1793
Bengali calendar 1278
Berber calendar 2821
British Regnal year 34  Vict. 1   35  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2415
Burmese calendar 1233
Byzantine calendar 7379–7380
Chinese calendar 庚午(Metal  Horse)
4567 or 4507
     to 
辛未年 (Metal  Goat)
4568 or 4508
Coptic calendar 1587–1588
Discordian calendar 3037
Ethiopian calendar 1863–1864
Hebrew calendar 5631–5632
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1927–1928
 - Shaka Samvat 1792–1793
 - Kali Yuga 4971–4972
Holocene calendar 11871
Igbo calendar 871–872
Iranian calendar 1249–1250
Islamic calendar 1287–1288
Japanese calendar Meiji 4
(明治4年)
Javanese calendar 1799–1800
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4204
Minguo calendar 41 before ROC
民前41年
Nanakshahi calendar 403
Thai solar calendar 2413–2414
Tibetan calendar 阳金马年
(male Iron-Horse)
1997 or 1616 or 844
     to 
阴金羊年
(female Iron-Goat)
1998 or 1617 or 845

1871 ( MDCCCLXXI ) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar , the 1871st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 871st year of the 2nd millennium , the 71st year of the 19th century , and the 2nd year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1871, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 3 is the third day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 362 days remaining until the end of the year. Perihelion, the point during the year when the Earth is closest to the Sun, occurs around this date.

January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 347 days remaining until the end of the year.

North German Confederation Federal state in Northern Germany in 1867–1870

The North German Confederation was the German federal state which existed from July 1867 to December 1870. Some historians also use the name for the alliance of 22 German states formed on 18 August 1866. In 1870–1871, the south German states of Baden, Hesse-Darmstadt, Württemberg and Bavaria joined the country. On 1 January 1871, the country adopted a new constitution, which was written under the title of a new "German Confederation" but already gave it the name "German Empire" in the preamble and article 11. As the state system largely remained the same in the German Empire, the North German Confederation continues as the German nation state which still exists.

AprilJune

April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, the fifth in the early Julian, the first of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the second of five months to have a length of less than 31 days.

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 271 days remaining until the end of the year.

New Jersey State Detectives law enforcement agency in New Jersey, United States

The New Jersey State Detectives are commissioned by the Governor of New Jersey as police officers with statewide jurisdiction. All are members of the historic New Jersey Detective Agency, a body politic created by the New Jersey Legislature in 1871. Current members come from the ranks of federal, state, county and municipal law enforcement agencies. They have specialized training and experience in many facets of law enforcement including firearms, narcotics, sex crimes, arson, organized crime and street gang investigations. The cumulative experience of this agency's members span hundreds of years of policing and the investigation of thousands of crimes.

JulySeptember

July 13 is the 194th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 171 days remaining until the end of the year.

The Crystal Palace former building originally in Hyde Park, London, 1854 relocated to Bromley, South London

The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and plate-glass structure originally built in Hyde Park, London, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. From 1 May until 11 October 1851 more than 14,000 exhibitors from around the world gathered in its 990,000-square-foot (92,000 m2) exhibition space to display examples of technology developed in the Industrial Revolution. Designed by Joseph Paxton, the Great Exhibition building was 1,851 feet (564 m) long, with an interior height of 128 feet (39 m). It was three times larger than the size of St Paul's Cathedral. The introduction of the sheet glass method into Britain by Chance Brothers in 1832 made possible the production of large sheets of cheap but strong glass, and its use in the Crystal Palace created a structure with the greatest area of glass ever seen in a building and astonished visitors with its clear walls and ceilings that did not require interior lights.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryJune

James Weldon Johnson Jamesweldonjohnson.jpg
James Weldon Johnson
Friedrich Ebert Friedrich Ebert face.jpg
Friedrich Ebert
Birdie Blye BIRDIE BLYE.jpg
Birdie Blye
Heinrich Mann Bundesarchiv Bild 183-R98911, Heinrich Mann.jpg
Heinrich Mann
Christian Morgenstern Morgenstern-h420.jpg
Christian Morgenstern
Ernst Stromer von Reichenbach Ernst Stromer.jpg
Ernst Stromer von Reichenbach

JulyDecember

Marcel Proust Marcel Proust 1900-2.jpg
Marcel Proust
Orville Wright Orville Wright-1928.jpg
Orville Wright
Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford LOC.jpg
Ernest Rutherford
Pietro Badoglio Pietro Badoglio 3.jpg
Pietro Badoglio

Date Unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

John Herschel Julia Margaret Cameron - John Herschel (Metropolitan Museum of Art copy, restored) levels.jpg
John Herschel
Samuel Harvey Taylor Samuel Taylor.png
Samuel Harvey Taylor

JulyDecember

Cristina Trivulzio Belgiojoso Cristina Trivulzio Belgiojoso by Henri Lehmann.jpg
Cristina Trivulzio Belgiojoso

Related Research Articles

1952 Year

1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1952nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 952nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1950s decade.

1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1957th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 957th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1950s decade.

1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1948th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 948th year of the 2nd millennium, the 48th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1940s decade.

1939 Year

1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1939th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 939th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1930s decade. This year also marks the start of the Second World War, the largest and deadliest conflict in human history.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1946th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 946th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1940s decade.

1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1881st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 881st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1881, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1870th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 870th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1870, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1884 Year

1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1884th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 884th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1884, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1955th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 955th year of the 2nd millennium, the 55th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1950s decade.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1953rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 953rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1950s decade.

1821 Year

1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1821st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 821st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1821, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1934th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 934th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1930s decade.

1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1954th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 954th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1950s decade.

1830 Year

1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1830th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 830th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1830, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. It is known in European history as a rather tumultuous year with the Revolutions of 1830 in France, Belgium, Poland, Switzerland and Italy.

1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1950th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 950th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1950s decade.

References

  1. "Civil Service Commission", in Landmark Legislation, 1774-2002: Major U.S. Acts and Treaties, ed. by Stephen W. Stathis (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2003) p107
  2. BBC History, July 2011, p12
  3. Businger, Steven; M. P. Nogelmeier; P. W. U. Chinn; T. Schroeder (2018). "Hurricane with a History: Hawaiian Newspapers Illuminate an 1871 Storm". Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. 99 (2): 137–47. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-16-0333.1.
  4. Businger, Steven; Nogelmeier, M. Puakea; Chinn, Pauline W. U.; Schroeder, Thomas (1 February 2018). "Hurricane with a History: Hawaiian Newspapers Illuminate an 1871 Storm". Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 99 (1): 137–147. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-16-0333.1 . Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  5. Edward Joesting, Kauai: The Separate Kingdom (University of Hawaii Press, 1988) p171
  6. John Taliaferro, In a Far Country: The True Story of a Mission, a Marriage, a Murder, and the Remarkable Reindeer Rescue of 1898 (PublicAffairs, 2007) p179
  7. Mitchell Snay, Horace Greeley and the Politics of Reform in Nineteenth-Century America (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011) p172
  8. "1871 Java - Port Darwin Cable". History of the Atlantic Cable & Undersea Communications. 2014-11-05. Archived from the original on January 6, 2015. Retrieved 2015-01-03.
  9. Stanley, Henry Morton (1872). How I Found Livingstone - Travels, Adventures, and Discoveries in Central Africa; Including Four Months' Residence with Dr. Livingstone (1984 ed.). Crown Buildings, 188 Fleet Street, London: Sampson Low, Marston, Low, and Searle. p. 412. ISBN   9780705415132.