1876 FA Cup Final

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1876 FA Cup Final
1896 FA Cup.jpg
Event 1875–76 FA Cup
Wanderers won after a replay
Final
After extra time
Date11 March 1876 (1876-03-11)
Venue Kennington Oval, London
Referee W.S. Buchanan (Clapham Rovers)
Attendance3,500
Replay
Date18 March 1876 (1876-03-18)
Venue Kennington Oval, London
Referee William Rawson
Attendance3,500
1875
1877

The 1876 FA Cup Final was a football match between Wanderers and Old Etonians on 11 March 1876 at Kennington Oval in London. It was the fifth final of the world's oldest football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup (known in the modern era as the FA Cup). Wanderers had won the Cup on two previous occasions. The Etonians were playing in their second consecutive final, having lost in the 1875 final. Both teams had conceded only one goal in the four rounds prior to the final. In the semi-finals Wanderers defeated Swifts and the Etonians beat the 1874 FA Cup winners Oxford University.

Contents

The match finished in a 1–1 draw, the second time an FA Cup Final had finished all-square. John Hawley Edwards scored for Wanderers, but the Etonians equalised with a goal credited in modern publications to Alexander Bonsor, although contemporary newspaper reports do not identify him as the scorer. A week later, the replay took place at the same venue. The Etonians were forced to make a number of changes due to players being unavailable, and the revised team was no match for the Wanderers, who won 3–0. Charles Wollaston and Thomas Hughes scored a goal apiece in a five-minute spell before half-time, and Hughes added the third early in the second half.

Route to the final

Old Etonians, the team for former pupils of Eton College, [1] had reached the 1875 final but been defeated by Royal Engineers. Wanderers had won the competition in both 1872 and 1873 but had not progressed beyond the quarter-finals in the subsequent two seasons. Both teams entered the 1875–76 competition at the first round stage and were allocated matches at home. [2] [3] Wanderers defeated a team from the 1st Surrey Rifles regiment 5–0, and the Etonians overcame Pilgrims 4–1. In the second round Wanderers defeated Crystal Palace (not the current professional club) 3–0 and the Etonians had an easy win over Maidenhead, scoring eight goals without reply. [2] [3]

At the quarter-final stage, Wanderers took on the world's oldest football club, Sheffield F.C. and won 20, and the Etonians gained a 1–0 victory over Clapham Rovers. [2] [3] Both semi-final matches took place at Kennington Oval in London, as stipulated in the original rules of the competition. The Etonians beat the 1874 FA Cup winners Oxford University 10 in the first semi-final, and a week later Wanderers clinched their place in the final, defeating the Slough-based club Swifts 21. [2] [3]

Match

Summary

Etonian player Alfred Lyttelton also played first-class cricket, as depicted in this caricature published in Vanity Fair in 1884 Alfred Lyttelton, Vanity Fair, 1884-09-20.jpg
Etonian player Alfred Lyttelton also played first-class cricket, as depicted in this caricature published in Vanity Fair in 1884

Three sets of brothers played in the match. Francis and Hubert Heron lined up for the Wanderers, while the Etonians' team included Hon. Edward Lyttelton and his brother Hon. Alfred Lyttelton and Albert Meysey-Thompson and his brother Charles. The latter pair's surname had been simply Thompson until it was changed in 1874, and for the final Albert played under the name Thompson and Charles under the name Meysey. [4] This is the only occasion that two or more pairs of brothers have played in the same FA Cup Final. [5] Later that year, Francis Birley married Margaret, sister of his teammate Jarvis Kenrick. [6]

The Etonian team also included Julian Sturgis, who had been born in the U.S. and was the first foreign-born player to appear in the Cup Final (discounting those born to British parents in the British Empire), [7] as well as Arthur Kinnaird, who had captained Wanderers to victory in the 1873 FA Cup Final. [8] Wanderers began the match with two full-backs, two half-backs and six forwards, while the Etonians opted for one full-back, two half-backs and seven forwards. [4]

Wanderers won the coin toss and chose to start the game defending the Harleyford Road end of The Oval. The crowd was estimated at 3,500, the largest for an FA Cup Final up to that point. [9] The match was played in a strong wind, to the extent that when Frederick Maddison took a corner kick for Wanderers, the gale blew the ball back out of play. [4] The Wanderers dominated the early stages of the game, but the Etonians kept them at bay for around 35 minutes until Charles Wollaston eluded Thompson and passed the ball to John Hawley Edwards, who kicked it narrowly under the crossbar of the Etonians' goal to give Wanderers the lead. [10] In the second half the Old Etonians had the wind in their favour and had the better of the play. Around five minutes after the interval, a corner kick to the Etonians led to a "scrimmage" (a term in common use at the time to describe a group of players struggling to gain possession of the ball) in front of their opponents' goal, which resulted in the ball and a number of players being forced over the goal-line, uprooting the goalposts in the process. Modern sources credit the goal to Alexander Bonsor, [11] but contemporary newspaper reports in The Sporting Life and Bell's Life in London do not mention his name, merely noting that the goal was scored "from a scrimmage". [10] Neither team could manage to score another goal, and the game finished with the scores level, meaning that for the second successive season a replay would be needed to determine the winners of the competition. [11]

Details

Wanderers 1–1 (a.e.t.) Old Etonians
Edwards Soccerball shade.svg 35' Report Bonsor Soccerball shade.svg 50'(disputed) [12]
Kennington Oval, London [4]
Attendance: 3,500 [4]
Referee: W.S. Buchanan (Clapham Rovers) [4]
Kit left arm wanderers FC.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body wanderers FC.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm wanderers FC.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Wanderers
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Old Etonians
Wanderers: [4]
GK W. D. O. Greig
FB Alfred Stratford
FB William Lindsay
HB Frederick Maddison
HB Francis Birley
FW Charles Wollaston
FW Francis Heron
FW Hubert Heron
FW John Hawley Edwards
FW Jarvis Kenrick
FW Thomas Hughes
Old Etonians: [4]
GK Quintin Hogg
FB James Welldon
HBHon. Edward Lyttelton
HB Albert Thompson
FW Arthur Kinnaird
FW Charles Meysey
FWCapt. William Kenyon-Slaney
FWHon. Alfred Lyttelton
FW Julian Sturgis
FW Alexander Bonsor
FW Herbert Alleyne
Match rules:
90 minutes normal time.
30 minutes extra-time if scores are level, at captains' discretion.
Replay if scores still level.
No substitutes.

Replay

Summary

The replay took place one week later at the same venue. The Wanderers fielded an unchanged team, but the Etonians had to make a number of changes, as Meysey was injured and three other players were unavailable due to other commitments. One of the replacements, Edgar Lubbock, had not long recovered from a bout of illness and was noted as being out of practice, and Kinnaird was still suffering the after-effects of an injury sustained in the original match. [13]

The weather on the day of the match was extremely cold, with the threat of snow. The Etonians began the match playing in a rough manner, [13] and there were also many appeals from the players for handball, which disrupted play. After around half an hour, the Wanderers' forwards surged towards their opponents' goal and Charles Wollaston got the final kick which sent the ball past goalkeeper Quintin Hogg, one of the replacement players brought in for the replay. [12] Almost immediately afterwards, another massed attack by the Wanderers led to Thomas Hughes doubling the lead. [12]

Soon after half-time, Hawley Edwards, Francis Heron and Jarvis Kenrick combined in a skilful attack and set up Hughes to score his second goal of the game. [12] Although the Wanderers' goalkeeper, W. D. O. Greig, was called into action several times, the Etonians were unable to get the ball past him, and the match finished 3–0 to the Wanderers. [13] The winning team's captain Francis Birley was praised for his performance by the press, as were both Lyttleton brothers for the Etonians. [13]

Details

Wanderers 3–0 Old Etonians
Wollaston Soccerball shade.svg 30'
Hughes Soccerball shade.svg 33'Soccerball shade.svg 50'
Report
Kennington Oval, London [4]
Attendance: 3,500 [4]
Referee: William Rawson (Oxford University) [4]
Kit left arm wanderers FC.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body wanderers FC.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm wanderers FC.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Wanderers
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Old Etonians
Wanderers: [4]
GK W. D. O. Greig
FB Alfred Stratford
FB William Lindsay
HB Frederick Maddison
HB Francis Birley
FW Charles Wollaston
FW Francis Heron
FW Hubert Heron
FW John Hawley Edwards
FW Jarvis Kenrick
FW Thomas Hughes
Old Etonians: [4]
GK Quintin Hogg
FB Edgar Lubbock
HBHon. Edward Lyttelton
HB Matt Farrer
FW Arthur Kinnaird
FW James Stronge
FWCapt.William Kenyon-Slaney
FWHon. Alfred Lyttelton
FW Julian Sturgis
FW Alexander Bonsor
FW Herbert Alleyne
Match rules:
90 minutes normal time.
30 minutes extra-time if scores are level, at captains' discretion.
Replay if scores still level.
No substitutes.

Post-match

As occurred each year until 1882, the winning team did not receive the trophy at the stadium on the day of the match, but later in the year at their annual dinner. [14] In addition to receiving the Cup, the winning team each received a gold medal from the committee of Surrey County Cricket Club. [13] A week after the replay, four of the victorious Wanderers were chosen to represent London in a match against an equivalent team from Sheffield. Despite their presence, the London XI lost the game 6–0. [15]

Related Research Articles

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Albert Childers Meysey-Thompson was an English barrister and an amateur footballer who played for Wanderers in the 1872 FA Cup Final and for Old Etonians in the 1875 and 1876 FA Cup Finals.

George Hubert Hugh Heron was an English footballer who made five appearances as a forward for England in the 1870s and won three FA Cup winners' medals.

The 1874–75 FA Cup was the fourth season of England's oldest football tournament, the Football Association Challenge Cup or "FA Cup". 29 teams entered, one more than the previous season, although four of the 29 never played a match. The final was contested by Royal Engineers – playing in their third final in the four seasons of the FA Cup – and Old Etonians – playing in their first final. On their way to the final, Royal Engineers knocked out Cambridge University in the Second Round and holders Oxford University in the Semi-finals, while Old Etonians only managed to score more than one goal in one match: their second replay against Swifts, which they won 3–0. The biggest win of the competition was recorded by two-time FA Cup winners Wanderers, who beat Farningham 16–0 in the First Round.

Shropshire Wanderers F.C. were an amateur association football club based in Shrewsbury, England. They were active during the 1870s.

John Hawley Edwards was an English footballer who made one appearance for England in 1874, before going on to play for Wales in 1876. He was a member of the Wanderers team that won the 1876 FA Cup Final.

Francis Hornby Birley was an English footballer who played as a half back. He won the FA Cup three times in the 1870s and made two appearances for England in 1874 and 1875.

Thomas Bridges Hughes was an English amateur footballer who was the first player to score two goals in an FA Cup Final, with Wanderers in 1876. He subsequently had a long career as a schoolteacher.

William Lindsay was an English amateur footballer who, generally playing as a full back, helped the Wanderers win the FA Cup in 1876, 1877 and 1878 and made one appearance for England in 1877. He also played cricket for Surrey between 1876 and 1882.

Harry Chester Goodhart was an English amateur footballer who played as a forward in four FA Cup Finals for Old Etonians, before going on to become Professor of Humanity at the University of Edinburgh.

Revd. Charles Maude Meysey-Thompson was an English clergyman who, as an amateur footballer, won the FA Cup in 1873 with the Wanderers. He also played in the 1876 FA Cup Final for the Old Etonians and for the Scottish XI in the last representative match against England in 1872.

Colonel William Merriman was a British officer in the Royal Engineers who played as a goalkeeper in three FA Cup Finals, winning the cup in 1875.

References

General
Specific
  1. Warsop, p. 21
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Wanderers". The Football Club History Database. Retrieved 15 March 2011.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Old Etonians". The Football Club History Database. Retrieved 15 March 2011.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Warsop, p. 45
  5. Collett, Mike (2003). The Complete Record of the FA Cup. Sports Books. pp. 792–793. ISBN   1-899807-19-5.
  6. Warsop, p. 64
  7. Warsop, p. 128
  8. Warsop, p. 93
  9. Warsop, pp. 40–45
  10. 1 2 Warsop, p. 33
  11. 1 2 Barnes, Stuart, ed. (2009). Nationwide Football Annual 2009–2010. SportsBooks. p. 132. ISBN   978-1-899807-81-9.
  12. 1 2 3 4 Warsop, p. 34
  13. 1 2 3 4 5 Warsop, p. 46
  14. Warsop, p. 53
  15. Cavallini, Rob (2005). The Wanderers F.C.: Five Times F.A. Cup Winners. Dog N Duck Publications. p. 47. ISBN   0-9550496-0-1.