1882

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2.jpg|thumb|right|The "Elektromote", the world's first trolleybus, [1] in Berlin, Germany, 1882]]

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1882 ( MDCCCLXXXII ) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar , the 1882nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 882nd year of the 2nd millennium , the 82nd year of the 19th century , and the 3rd year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1882, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 363 days remaining until the end of the year.

Standard Oil Co. Inc. was an American oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company and monopoly. Established in 1870 by John D. Rockefeller and Henry Flagler as a corporation in Ohio, it was the largest oil refinery in the world of its time. Its history as one of the world's first and largest multinational corporations ended in 1911, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in a landmark case, that Standard Oil was an illegal monopoly.

Trust (business) large grouping of business interests with significant market power; a large corporation, corporate group, or trade association that holds a dominant position in its sector of activity

A trust or corporate trust is a large grouping of business interests with significant market power, which may be embodied as a corporation or as a group of corporations that cooperate with one another in various ways. These ways can include constituting a trade association, owning stock in one another, constituting a corporate group, or combinations thereof. The term trust is often used in a historical sense to refer to monopolies or near-monopolies in the United States during the Second Industrial Revolution in the 19th century and early 20th century.

AprilJune

April 3 is the 93rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 272 days remaining until the end of the year.

Jesse James American outlaw, confederate guerrilla, and train robber

Jesse Woodson James was an American outlaw, bank and train robber, guerrilla, and leader of the James–Younger Gang. Raised in the "Little Dixie" area of western Missouri, James and his family maintained strong Southern sympathies. He and his brother Frank James joined pro-Confederate guerrillas known as "bushwhackers" operating in Missouri and Kansas during the American Civil War. As followers of William Quantrill and "Bloody Bill" Anderson, they were accused of participating in atrocities against Union soldiers and civilian abolitionists, including the Centralia Massacre in 1864.

Robert Ford (outlaw) American outlaw

Robert Newton Ford was an American outlaw best known for killing his gang leader Jesse James in April 1882, to collect a reward and a promised amnesty for past crimes. For about a year, Ford and his older brother Charles performed paid re-enactments of the killing at publicity events. Later he drifted around the West, operating saloons and dance halls.

JulySeptember

Photograph of the comet as seen from Cape Town by David Gill Great Comet of 1882.jpg
Photograph of the comet as seen from Cape Town by David Gill

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryMarch

Virginia Woolf George Charles Beresford - Virginia Woolf in 1902 - Restoration.jpg
Virginia Woolf
Franklin D. Roosevelt FDR in 1933.jpg
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Louis St. Laurent Louisstlaurent.jpg
Louis St. Laurent
James Joyce Revolutionary Joyce Better Contrast.jpg
James Joyce
Carlos Blanco Galindo Ex presidente Carlos Blanco Galindo.jpg
Carlos Blanco Galindo
Rene Coty Rene Coty-1929.jpg
René Coty
Emmy Noether Noether.jpg
Emmy Noether

AprilJune

Leopold Stokowski Leopold Stokowski LOC 26447u.jpg
Leopold Stokowski
Georges Braque Georges Braque, 1908, photograph published in Gelett Burgess, The Wild Men of Paris, Architectural Record, May 1910.jpg
Georges Braque
Karl Valentin Karl Valentin by Eugen Rosenfeld (1870 - 1940).jpg
Karl Valentin
Mohammad Mosaddegh Mossadeghmohammad.jpg
Mohammad Mosaddegh
Igor Stravinsky Igor Stravinsky LOC 32392u.jpg
Igor Stravinsky

JulySeptember

Johannes Hans Geiger Hans geiger.jpg
Johannes Hans Geiger

OctoberDecember

Robert H. Goddard Dr. Robert H. Goddard - GPN-2002-000131.jpg
Robert H. Goddard
Sybil Thorndike Sybil Thorndike.jpg
Sybil Thorndike
King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden 1962.jpg
King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden
Max Born Max Born.jpg
Max Born
Zoltan Kodaly Kodaly Zoltan 1930s.jpg
Zoltán Kodály

Date Unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Theodor Schwann Theodor Schwann Litho.jpg
Theodor Schwann
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, photographed by Julia Margaret Cameron in 1868.jpg
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Charles Darwin Charles Darwin seated crop.jpg
Charles Darwin
Giuseppe Garibaldi Giuseppe Garibaldi (1866).jpg
Giuseppe Garibaldi

JulyDecember

Mary Todd Lincoln Mary Todd Lincoln2crop.jpg
Mary Todd Lincoln
Friedrich Wohler Friedrich Wohler Litho.jpg
Friedrich Wöhler

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1952 Year

1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1952nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 952nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1950s decade.

1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1957th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 957th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1950s decade.

1939 Year

1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1939th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 939th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1930s decade. This year also marks the start of the Second World War, the largest and deadliest conflict in human history.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1956th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 956th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1950s decade.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1880th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 880th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1880, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1867th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 867th year of the 2nd millennium, the 67th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1867, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1892nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 892nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1892, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1884 Year

1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1884th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 884th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1884, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1930th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 930th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1930s decade.

1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1878th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 878th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1878, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1927th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 927th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1920s decade.

1800 Year

1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1800th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 800th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1800, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 12 days until 1899.

1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1935th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 935th year of the 2nd millennium, the 35th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1930s decade.

1803 Year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. "Elektromote". Siemens History. Siemens. Retrieved 2017-04-14.
  2. Whitten, David O.; Whitten, Bessie Emrick (1990). Handbook of American Business History: Manufacturing. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 182.
  3. Grothe, Mardy (2009). Viva la Repartee. HarperCollins. p. 34.
  4. Cooper, John. "Attribution of 'I have nothing to declare except my genius'". Oscar Wilde in America. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  5. Johnson, John W. (2001). Historic U.S. Court Cases. U.S.: Taylor & Francis. p. 54.
  6. Harris, Jack (1982-01-14). "The electricity of Holborn". New Scientist . London.
  7. "Luce Ben Aben School of Arab Embroidery I, Algiers, Algeria". World Digital Library . 1899. Retrieved 2013-09-26.