1886

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1886 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1886
MDCCCLXXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2639
Armenian calendar 1335
ԹՎ ՌՅԼԵ
Assyrian calendar 6636
Bahá'í calendar 42–43
Balinese saka calendar 1807–1808
Bengali calendar 1293
Berber calendar 2836
British Regnal year 49  Vict. 1   50  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2430
Burmese calendar 1248
Byzantine calendar 7394–7395
Chinese calendar 乙酉(Wood  Rooster)
4582 or 4522
     to 
丙戌年 (Fire  Dog)
4583 or 4523
Coptic calendar 1602–1603
Discordian calendar 3052
Ethiopian calendar 1878–1879
Hebrew calendar 5646–5647
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1942–1943
 - Shaka Samvat 1807–1808
 - Kali Yuga 4986–4987
Holocene calendar 11886
Igbo calendar 886–887
Iranian calendar 1264–1265
Islamic calendar 1303–1304
Japanese calendar Meiji 19
(明治19年)
Javanese calendar 1815–1816
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4219
Minguo calendar 26 before ROC
民前26年
Nanakshahi calendar 418
Thai solar calendar 2428–2429
Tibetan calendar 阴木鸡年
(female Wood-Rooster)
2012 or 1631 or 859
     to 
阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
2013 or 1632 or 860

1886 ( MDCCCLXXXVI ) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar , the 1886th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 886th year of the 2nd millennium , the 86th year of the 19th century , and the 7th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1886, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. The most recent year of such kind was 2010 and the next one will be 2021 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2011 and 2022 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 2100, will also be a common year starting on Friday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in August. Leap years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another one in February.

Contents

Events

January–March

January 29 –Karl Benz patent. 1885Benz.jpg
January 29 Karl Benz patent.

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

British rule in Burma Historical time period

British rule in Burma, also known as British Burma, lasted from 1824 to 1948, from the Anglo-Burmese wars through the creation of Burma as a Province of British India to the establishment of an independently administered colony, and finally independence. Various portions of Burmese territories, including Arakan, Tenasserim were annexed by the British after their victory in the First Anglo-Burmese War; Lower Burma was annexed in 1852 after the Second Anglo-Burmese War. The annexed territories were designated the minor province, British Burma, of British India in 1862.

Third Anglo-Burmese War

The Third Anglo-Burmese War, also known as the Third Burma War, was a conflict that took place during 7–29 November 1885, with sporadic resistance and insurgency continuing into 1887. It was the final of three wars fought in the 19th century between the Burmese and the British. The war saw the loss of sovereignty of an independent Burma under the Konbaung dynasty, whose rule had already been reduced to the territory known as Upper Burma, the region of Lower Burma having been annexed by the British in 1853, as a result of the Second Anglo-Burmese War.

April–June

May 8: Coca-Cola invented. Cocacola-5cents-1900 edit1.jpg
May 8: Coca-Cola invented.

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 271 days remaining until the end of the year.

William Ewart Gladstone British Liberal politician and prime minister of the United Kingdom

William Ewart Gladstone was a British statesman and Liberal Party politician. In a career lasting over sixty years, he served for twelve years as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, spread over four terms beginning in 1868 and ending in 1894. He also served as Chancellor of the Exchequer four times.

Government of Ireland Bill 1886

The Government of Ireland Bill 1886, commonly known as the First Home Rule Bill, was the first major attempt made by a British government to enact a law creating home rule for part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. It was introduced in 8 April 1886 by Liberal Prime Minister William Gladstone to create a devolved assembly for Ireland which would govern Ireland in specified areas. The Irish Parliamentary Party under Charles Stewart Parnell had been campaigning for home rule for Ireland since the 1870s.

June 10: Mount Tarawera erupts. Lake Tarawera.jpg
June 10: Mount Tarawera erupts.

June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 204 days remaining until the end of the year.

1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera Volcano eruption event in New Zealand

The most recent eruption of Mount Tarawera occurred in the early hours of 10 June 1886 in the North Island, New Zealand. It is the deadliest eruption in New Zealand since the arrival of Europeans. Up to 150 people, mostly Māori, were killed, and many settlements were destroyed or buried.

New Zealand Constitutional monarchy in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. Politically New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy with a unicameral parliamentary system. Geographically the country comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

July–September

November 30: Folies Bergère FolliesBergereBoxCostume.jpg
November 30: Folies Bergère

October–December

Date unknown


Births

January–February

Wilhelm Furtwängler Wilhelm Furtwängler.jpg
Wilhelm Furtwängler
Aeneas Francon Williams (right, holding a hat) standing on the steps of Wolseley House, Kalimpong 1914 Aeneas Francon Williams (right, holding a hat) standing on the steps of Wolseley House, Kalimpong 1914.jpg
Aeneas Francon Williams (right, holding a hat) standing on the steps of Wolseley House, Kalimpong 1914
Alfonso López Pumarejo Alfonso López Pumarejo.jpg
Alfonso López Pumarejo
Oskar Kokoschka Oskar Kokoschka (1963) by Erling Mandelmann.jpg
Oskar Kokoschka

March–April

Kazimierz Świtalski Switalski K.jpg
Kazimierz Świtalski
Kálmán Darányi Bundesarchiv Bild 183-E05367A, Johann von Daranyi.jpg
Kálmán Darányi
Margaret Woodrow Wilson Margaret Woodrow Wilson 1912.jpg
Margaret Woodrow Wilson

May–June

King Alfonso XIII of Spain Alfonso XIIIdeEspaña.jpg
King Alfonso XIII of Spain

July–August

Willem Drees Drees, W. - SFA002019221.jpg
Willem Drees
Walter H. Schottky Walter Hermann Schottky (1886-1976).jpg
Walter H. Schottky

September–October

Roberto María Ortiz Robertomortiz.jpg
Roberto María Ortiz
Archibald Hill Archibald Vivian Hill.jpg
Archibald Hill
David Ben-Gurion Ben Gurion 1959.jpg
David Ben-Gurion

November–December

Ali Jawdat al-Aiyubi Ali Al-Ayoubi.jpg
Ali Jawdat al-Aiyubi
Diego Rivera Diego Rivera with a xoloitzcuintle dog in the Blue House, Coyoacan - Google Art Project.jpg
Diego Rivera
Ty Cobb 1913 Ty Cobb portrait photo.png
Ty Cobb

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson daguerreotype (cropped).jpg
Emily Dickinson
Ludwig II of Bavaria Ludwig II of Bavaria.jpg
Ludwig II of Bavaria

July–December

Franz Liszt Ary Scheffer - Franz Liszt.jpg
Franz Liszt
Eliza Lynch Elisa Lynch official portrait.jpg
Eliza Lynch

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

1952 Year

1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1952nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 952nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1950s decade.

1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1957th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 957th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1950s decade.

1939 Year

1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1939th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 939th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1930s decade. This year also marks the start of the Second World War, the largest and deadliest conflict in human history.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1946th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 946th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1940s decade.

1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1902nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 902nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1902, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1966th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 966th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1960s decade.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1892nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 892nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1892, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1884 Year

1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1884th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 884th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1884, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1953rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 953rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1950s decade.

1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1930th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 930th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1930s decade.

1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1878th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 878th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1878, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1934th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 934th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1930s decade.

1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1909th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 909th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1909, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1938th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 938th year of the 2nd millennium, the 38th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1930s decade.

1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1950th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 950th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1950s decade.

References

  1. Soar, Phil; Tyler, Martin (2005). The Official Illustrated History of Arsenal. London: Hamlyn. p. 23. ISBN   978-0-600-61344-2.
  2. "Memoirs of an Arabian Princess: An Autobiography". World Digital Library . 1888. Retrieved 2013-09-19.