1888

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1888 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1888
MDCCCLXXXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2641
Armenian calendar 1337
ԹՎ ՌՅԼԷ
Assyrian calendar 6638
Bahá'í calendar 44–45
Balinese saka calendar 1809–1810
Bengali calendar 1295
Berber calendar 2838
British Regnal year 51  Vict. 1   52  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2432
Burmese calendar 1250
Byzantine calendar 7396–7397
Chinese calendar 丁亥(Fire  Pig)
4584 or 4524
     to 
戊子年 (Earth  Rat)
4585 or 4525
Coptic calendar 1604–1605
Discordian calendar 3054
Ethiopian calendar 1880–1881
Hebrew calendar 5648–5649
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1944–1945
 - Shaka Samvat 1809–1810
 - Kali Yuga 4988–4989
Holocene calendar 11888
Igbo calendar 888–889
Iranian calendar 1266–1267
Islamic calendar 1305–1306
Japanese calendar Meiji 21
(明治21年)
Javanese calendar 1817–1818
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4221
Minguo calendar 24 before ROC
民前24年
Nanakshahi calendar 420
Thai solar calendar 2430–2431
Tibetan calendar 阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
2014 or 1633 or 861
     to 
阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
2015 or 1634 or 862

1888 ( MDCCCLXXXVIII ) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar , the 1888th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 888th year of the 2nd millennium , the 88th year of the 19th century , and the 9th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1888, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Germany, 1888 is known as the Year of the Three Emperors. Currently, it is the year that, when written in Roman numerals, has the most digits (13). The next year that also has 13 digits is the year 2388. The record will be surpassed as late as 2888, which has 14 digits.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG, such as the years 1888, 1928, 1956, 1984, 2012, 2040, 2068, 2096, 2108, 2136, 2164, and 2192 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1996 and 2024 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

January–March

March 11: Great Blizzard of 1888. Brooklyn blizzard 1888.jpg
March 11: Great Blizzard of 1888.

January 3 is the third day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 362 days remain until the end of the year. Perihelion, the point during the year when the Earth is closest to the Sun, occurs around this date.

Lick Observatory Astronomical observatory in California, USA

The Lick Observatory is an astronomical observatory, owned and operated by the University of California. It is situated on the summit of Mount Hamilton, in the Diablo Range just east of San Jose, California, US. The observatory is managed by the University of California Observatories, with headquarters on the University of California, Santa Cruz campus, where its scientific staff moved in the mid-1960s. It is named after James Lick.

January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 353 days remain until the end of the year.

April–June

April 3 is the 93rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 272 days remain until the end of the year.

Emma Elizabeth Smith was a prostitute and murder victim of mysterious origins in late-19th century London. Her killing was the first of the Whitechapel murders, and it is possible she was a victim of the notorious serial killer known as Jack the Ripper, though this is considered unlikely by most modern authors.

Whitechapel murders 1880s East End of London serial murders

The Whitechapel murders were committed in or near the impoverished Whitechapel district in the East End of London between 3 April 1888 and 13 February 1891. At various points some or all of these eleven unsolved murders of women have been ascribed to the notorious unidentified serial killer known as Jack the Ripper.

July–September

August 31: Victim found from Jack the Ripper? Jack-the-Ripper-The-Nemesis-of-Neglect-Punch-London-Charivari-cartoon-poem-1888-09-29.jpg
August 31: Victim found from Jack the Ripper?

July 2 is the 183rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 182 days remain until the end of the year.

July 27 is the 208th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 157 days remain until the end of the year.

Match device for lighting fires

A match is a tool for starting a fire. Typically, matches are made of small wooden sticks or stiff paper. One end is coated with a material that can be ignited by frictional heat generated by striking the match against a suitable surface. Wooden matches are packaged in matchboxes, and paper matches are partially cut into rows and stapled into matchbooks. The coated end of a match, known as the match "head", consists of a bead of active ingredients and binder; often colored for easier inspection. There are two main types of matches: safety matches, which can be struck only against a specially prepared surface, and strike-anywhere matches, for which any suitably frictional surface can be used.

October–December

Date unknown

Births

January–February

Carlos Quintanilla CARLOS QUINTANILLA QUIROGA.jpg
Carlos Quintanilla
Otto Stern Otto Stern 1950s.jpg
Otto Stern

March–April

Ilo Wallace Mrs. Henry Wallace.jpg
Ilo Wallace

May–June

David Dougal Williams (artist) David Dougal Williams (artist).jpg
David Dougal Williams (artist)

July–August

Herbert Spencer Gasser Herbert Spencer Gasser nobel.jpg
Herbert Spencer Gasser
Frits Zernike Zernike.jpg
Frits Zernike

September–October

Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. 1938.jpg
Joseph P. Kennedy Sr.
Maurice Chevalier Maurice Chevalier-publicity.jpg
Maurice Chevalier
T. S. Eliot Thomas Stearns Eliot by Lady Ottoline Morrell (1934).jpg
T. S. Eliot
Henry A. Wallace Henry-A.-Wallace-Townsend.jpeg
Henry A. Wallace

November–December

Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman Sir CV Raman.JPG
Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman
Harpo Marx Harpo Marx.jpg
Harpo Marx
Gladys Cooper GladysCooper.jpg
Gladys Cooper
F. W. Murnau Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau.jpg
F. W. Murnau

Date Unknown

Deaths

January–June

Wilhelm I Kaiser Wilhelm I. .JPG
Wilhelm I
Ascanio Sobrero Ascanio Sobrero.jpg
Ascanio Sobrero

July–December

Paul Langerhans Paul Langerhans 1878.jpg
Paul Langerhans
John Pemberton John Pemberton.jpg
John Pemberton
Carl Zeiss Carl Zeiss from Auerbach 1907.png
Carl Zeiss

Date unknown

Caroline Howard Gilman Caroline Howard Gilman by John Wesley Jarvis circa 1820.jpeg
Caroline Howard Gilman

Related Research Articles

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1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1931st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 931st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1930s decade.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1907th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 907th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1907, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1906th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 906th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1906, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1904th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 904th year of the 2nd millennium, the 4th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1904, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1902nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 902nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1902, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1895th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 895th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1895, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1910th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 910th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1910, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1897th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 897th year of the 2nd millennium, the 97th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1897, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1881st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 881st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1881, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1876th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 876th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1876, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1877th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 877th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1877, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1869 (MDCCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1869th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 869th year of the 2nd millennium, the 69th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1869, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1892nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 892nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1892, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1852 (MDCCCLII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1852nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 852nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1852, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1888 in the United Kingdom. This year is noted for the first Whitechapel murders.

References

  1. Newton, John A. (2004). "King, Edward (1829–1910)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography . Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/34319 . Retrieved October 12, 2012.(subscription or UK public library membership required)
  2. "The Match Workers Strike Fund Register". Trades Union Congress Library at the London Metropolitan University. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  3. 1 2 3 Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  4. "Wells College Destroyed" (PDF). The New York Times . August 10, 1888.
  5. "The first engine-driven flight". Daimler. Retrieved April 15, 2016.
  6. Muscat, Mark Geoffrey (2016). Maltese Architecture 1900–1970: Progress and Innovations. Valletta: Fondazzjoni Patrimonju Malti. p. 72. ISBN   9789990932065.

Further reading and year books