1889 college football season

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The 1889 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1889–90 academic year.

Contents

The 1889 Princeton Tigers football team, led by team captain Edgar Allen Poe, compiled a perfect 10–0 record and was recognized as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis. [1]

In the South, Wofford defeated Furman in the first intercollegiate game played in the state of South Carolina. The game featured no uniforms, no positions, and the rules were formulated before the game. [2]

As the popularity of the program increased, new football programs were established in 1889 at Iowa and Washington.

All eleven players selected by Caspar Whitney for the first All-America college football team came from the Big Three (Princeton, Yale, and Harvard). Four of the honorees have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: fullback Knowlton Ames (Princeton), end Amos Alonzo Stagg (Yale), tackle Hector Cowan (Princeton), and guard Pudge Heffelfinger (Yale).

Conference and program changes

School1888 Conference1889 Conference
Delaware football Program establishedIndependent
Iowa College Pioneers Program establishedIndependent
State University of Iowa Hawkeyes Program establishedIndependent
Washington football Program establishedIndependent

Awards and honors

All-Americans

The consensus All-America team included:

PositionNameHeightWeight (lbs.)ClassHometownTeam
QB Edgar Allan Poe Jr. Baltimore, Maryland Princeton
HB Roscoe Channing 141Sr. New York, New York Princeton
HB James P. Lee Jr.New York, New York Harvard
FB Snake Ames 5'10"157Sr. Chicago, Illinois Princeton
E Amos Alonzo Stagg Sr. West Orange, New Jersey Yale
T Hector Cowan Sr. Hobart, New York Princeton
G Pudge Heffelfinger 6'4"178So. Minneapolis, Minnesota Yale
C William George Sr. Princeton
G John Cranston Jr. Sheridan, New York Harvard
T Charles O. Gill Sr. Walpole, Massachusetts Yale
E Arthur Cumnock Jr. Danielson, Connecticut Harvard

Statistical leaders

Conference standings

The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:

1889 Eastern Intercollegiate Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Dartmouth $400  710
  • $ Conference champion

Independents

1889 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Princeton     1000
Yale     1510
Dartmouth     710
Harvard     920
Franklin & Marshall     511
Navy     411
Tufts     310
Lehigh     832
Cornell     840
Penn     760
Brown     220
Penn State     220
Delaware     111
Wesleyan     571
Bucknell     231
Amherst     352
Lafayette     342
Columbia     272
Fordham     130
Rutgers     140
NYU     020
1889 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Miami (OH)     400
Butler     200
Washington University     200
Iowa College     100
Lake Forest     100
Notre Dame     100
South Dakota     101
Minnesota     310
Purdue     210
South Dakota State     001
Northwestern     220
Cincinnati     110
Wabash     110
Michigan     120
Indiana     011
Iowa     010
Wisconsin     020
1889 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Trinity (NC)     200
Georgetown     510
Navy     411
Virginia     420
Wake Forest     220
North Carolina     110
Delaware     111
Johns Hopkins     241
Richmond     120
Furman     020
1889 Far West college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
USC     200
California     000
Washington     010

Related Research Articles

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Princeton Tigers Athletic teams of Princeton University

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Princeton Tigers football

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William Rhodes (American football)

William Castle Rhodes was American football player and coach. Rhodes played tackle at Yale University from 1887 to 1890 and was selected for the 1890 College Football All-America Team. After playing for the Cleveland Athletic Club and coaching at Western Reserve in 1891, Rhodes return to his alma mater to served head coach for the Yale Bulldogs football team in 1893 and 1894, compiling a record of 26–1. Rhodes' 1894 team won all 16 of its games and was later recognized as a national champion by a number of selectors.

1896 college football season

The 1896 college football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing Lafayette and Princeton as having been selected national champions. Lafayette finished with an 11–0–1 record while Princeton had a 10–0–1 record. In the second game of the season for both teams, Lafayette and Princeton played to a scoreless tie. Both teams had signature wins: Lafayette defeated Penn 6–4, giving the Quakers their only loss of the season, while Princeton defeated previously unbeaten Yale, 24–6, on Thanksgiving Day in the last game of the season. Princeton was retroactively named the 1896 national champions by the Billingsley Report, the Helms Athletic Foundation, the Houlgate System, and Lafayette and Princeton were named national co-champions by the National Championship Foundation and Parke Davis.

1895 college football season

The 1895 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1895–96 academic year.

1894 college football season

The 1894 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1894–95 academic year.

1893 college football season

The 1893 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1893–94 academic year.

1892 college football season

The 1892 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1892–93 academic year.

1891 college football season

The 1891 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1891–92 academic year.

1890 college football season

The 1890 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1890–91 academic year.

1889 Princeton Tigers football team American college football season

The 1889 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in the 1889 college football season. The team finished with a 10–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champions by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis. It was Princeton's 15th national championship. The team outscored their opponents 484 to 29. The team was captained by Edgar Allan Poe, the second cousin of his namesake, the writer Edgar Allan Poe.

1893 Princeton Tigers football team American college football season

The 1893 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in the 1893 college football season. The team finished with an 11–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and National Championship Foundation. They outscored their opponents 270 to 14.

The 1883 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 1883 college football season. The team was the third intercollegiate football squad to represent the United States Naval Academy, and the first time the school participated in consecutive seasons. The squad was captained by member Frank Hill. The team played just a single game, a 2 to 0 (2–0) shutout loss to Johns Hopkins, which was the school's first ever loss. The squad was the first to have the approval of the academy's staff, and is regarded as the first official game played by the Midshipmen. The season continued a seven-season, eight game rivalry between the Naval Academy and Johns Hopkins.

The 1891 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1891 college football season. The team finished with a 13–0 record and a 488-0 season score. It was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis. Yale's 1891 season was part of a 37-game winning streak that began with the final game of the 1890 season and stopped at the end of the 1893 season.

The 1884 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 1884 college football season. The team was the fourth intercollegiate football squad to represent the United States Naval Academy, and was the final time the school played a single-game season. The squad was captained by rusher Jim Kittrell. The team's single game was a 9 to 6 (9–6) defeat of rival-school Johns Hopkins. The season continued a seven-season, eight game rivalry between the Naval Academy and Johns Hopkins. It was the final season that a Naval Academy team would go unbeaten and untied.

Early history of American football

The early history of American football can be traced to early versions of rugby football and association football. Both games have their origin in varieties of football played in Britain in the mid–19th century, in which a football is kicked at a goal or run over a line, which in turn were based on the varieties of English public school football games.

Princeton–Yale football rivalry

The Princeton–Yale football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Princeton Tigers of Princeton University and the Yale Bulldogs of Yale University. The football rivalry is among the oldest in American sports.

References

  1. "National Poll Champions" (PDF). NCAA Division I Football Records. National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2017. p. 110. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  2. Furman 2014 FB Record Book