1890 college football season

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The 1890 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1890–91 academic year.

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The 1890 Harvard Crimson football team compiled a perfect 11–0 record, outscored opponents by a total of 555 to 12, and was recognized as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis. [1]

In the Midwest, the Baker Methodists defeated the Kansas Jayhawks by a score of 229 in the first college football game played in Kansas. [2] In the South, Vanderbilt Commodores defeated Nashville (Peabody), 400, in the first college football game played in Tennessee. [3]

As the popularity of the sport increased, several notable programs were established in 1890, including Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Vanderbilt.

All eleven players selected by Caspar Whitney for the 1890 All-America college football team came from the Big Three (Harvard Princeton, and Yale). Three of the honorees have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Harvard's great tackle Marshall "Ma" Newell, Yale's guard Pudge Heffelfinger, and Yale's halfback Thomas "Bum" McClung.

Conference and program changes

School1889 Conference1890 Conference
Butler Bulldogs Independent IIAA
Colorado Silver and Gold Program establishedIndependent
DePauw Tigers Independent IIAA
Earlham Hustlin' Quakers Independent IIAA
Hanover Panthers Independent IIAA
Illinois Illini Program EstablishedIndependent
Indiana State Normal Sycamores Independent IIAA
Indiana Hoosiers Independent IIAA
Kansas Jayhawks Program EstablishedIndependent
Missouri Tigers Program EstablishedIndependent
Nashville Program EstablishedIndependent
Nebraska Old Gold Knights Program EstablishedIndependent
Purdue Boilermakers Independent IIAA
Rose Polytechnic Engineers Independent IIAA
Vanderbilt football Program EstablishedIndependent
Wabash Little Giants Independent IIAA
Western Reserve football Program establishedIndependent

Awards and honors

All-Americans

The consensus All-America team included:

PositionNameHeightWeight (lbs.)ClassHometownTeam
QB Dudley Dean Sr.Lake Village, New Hampshire Harvard
HB Bum McClung 5'10"165Jr. Knoxville, Tennessee Yale
HB John J. Corbett Fr. Boston, Massachusetts Harvard
FB Sheppard Homans, Jr. Jr. Englewood, New Jersey Princeton
E Frank Hallowell So. Medford, Massachusetts Harvard
T Marshall Newell 5'7"168Fr. Great Barrington, Massachusetts Harvard
G Pudge Heffelfinger 6'4"178Jr. Minneapolis, Minnesota Yale
C John Cranston Sr. Sheridan, New York Harvard
G Jesse Riggs Jr. Baltimore, Maryland Princeton
T William Rhodes Sr. Cleveland, Ohio Yale
E Ralph Warren Jr. Montclair, New Jersey Princeton

Statistical leaders

Conference standings

The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:

1890 Colorado Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Colorado Mines $300  600
Denver 210  320
Colorado College 120  230
Colorado 030  160
Colorado Agricultural 020  020
  • $ Conference champion
1890 Eastern Intercollegiate Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Williams $    500
Dartmouth     440
  • $ Conference champion
1890 Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Butler $301  301
Purdue 210  330
Wabash 030  030
  • $ Conference champion

Independents

1890 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Harvard     1100
Yale     1310
Princeton     1111
Franklin & Marshall     820
Navy     511
Penn     1130
Cornell     840
Washington & Jefferson     210
Syracuse     740
Lehigh     640
Delaware     320
Amherst     651
Rutgers     551
Dartmouth     440
Penn State     220
Colgate     110
Wesleyan     560
Tufts     230
Brown     241
Western Univ. Penn     120
Lafayette     251
Bucknell     141
Fordham     131
Massachusetts     140
Columbia     151
Army     010
Geneva     010
1890 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Nebraska     200
Washington University     200
Minnesota     511
Michigan     410
Northwestern     411
Missouri     210
Cincinnati     211
Lake Forest     530
Baker     110
Iowa     110
Illinois     120
Kansas     120
Ohio Wesleyan     130
Wisconsin     130
Ohio State     140
Doane     010
Washburn     010
1890 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Furman     200
Vanderbilt     100
Virginia     520
Navy     511
Delaware     320
Georgetown     331
Johns Hopkins     010
Nashville     010
Trinity (NC)     010
Richmond     030
1890 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Nebraska     200
Washington University     200
Minnesota     511
Michigan     410
Northwestern     411
Missouri     210
Cincinnati     211
Lake Forest     530
Baker     110
Iowa     110
Illinois     120
Kansas     120
Ohio Wesleyan     130
Wisconsin     130
Ohio State     140
Doane     010
Washburn     010

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1912 college football season

The 1912 college football season was the first of the modern era, as the NCAA implemented changes to increase scoring:

1924 college football season

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1923 college football season

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1922 college football season

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1908 college football season

The 1908 college football season ran from Saturday, September 19, to November 28. The Penn Quakers and the Harvard Crimson both finished the season unbeaten, though each had been tied once during the season. The LSU Tigers went unbeaten and untied against a weaker opposition. All three teams were named national champions retroactively by various organizations. Only Pennsylvania officially claims a national championship for the 1908 season.

William Rhodes (American football)

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1895 college football season

The 1895 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1895–96 academic year.

1889 college football season

The 1889 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1889–90 academic year.

1893 college football season

The 1893 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1893–94 academic year.

1892 college football season

The 1892 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1892–93 academic year.

1891 college football season

The 1891 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1891–92 academic year.

1890 Harvard Crimson football team American college football season

The 1890 Harvard Crimson football team was an American football team that represented Harvard University in the 1890 college football season. The team finished with an 11–0 record, shut out nine of eleven opponents, and outscored all opponents by a total of 555 to 12.

The 1891 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1891 college football season. The team finished with a 13–0 record and a 488-0 season score. It was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis. Yale's 1891 season was part of a 37-game winning streak that began with the final game of the 1890 season and stopped at the end of the 1893 season.

Early history of American football

The early history of American football can be traced to early versions of rugby football and association football. Both games have their origin in varieties of football played in Britain in the mid–19th century, in which a football is kicked at a goal or run over a line, which in turn were based on the varieties of English public school football games.

References

  1. "National Poll Champions" (PDF). NCAA Division I Football Records. National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2017. p. 110. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  2. Evans, Harold (August 1940). "College Football in Kansas". Kansas Historical Quarterly. pp. 285–311. Retrieved September 11, 2012.
  3. John Majors. "College Football". Tennessee Historical Society. Retrieved 2006-11-29.