1893 college football season

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The 1893 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1893–94 academic year.

Contents

The 1893 Princeton Tigers football team, led by captain Thomas Trenchard, compiled a perfect 11–0 record, outscored opponents by a total of 270 to 14, and has been recognized as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and National Championship Foundation. [1] [2] Despite Yale's loss to Princeton, one selector (Parke H. Davis) recognized the Bulldogs as the national champion.

All eleven players selected by Caspar Whitney and Walter Camp to the 1893 All-America college football team came from the Big Three (Princeton, Yale, and Harvard). Seven of the honorees have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: quarterback Philip King, fullback Charley Brewer (Harvard), end Frank Hinkey (Yale), tackle Marshall Newell (Harvard), tackle Langdon Lea (Princeton), guard Art Wheeler (Princeton), and guard Bill Hickok (Yale).

New programs established in 1893 included Boston College, LSU, Oregon State, Texas, and Washington State.

Conference and program changes

School1892 Conference1893 Conference
Boston College Eagles Program EstablishedIndependent
Louisiana State University Tigers Program EstablishedIndependent
New Hampshire College Wildcats Program EstablishedIndependent
Oregon Agricultural Aggies Program EstablishedIndependent
Texas Longhorns Program establishedIndependent
Washington Agricultural Cougars Program EstablishedIndependent

Princeton v. Yale

As the Princeton and Yale teams prepared to meet in late November 1893, an unprecedented amount of media and public attention fell upon the big game, which was being billed as the championship game of the season. Both teams entered the game with undefeated with records of 10–0. Yale had outscored its opponents 336-6 and was riding a 37-game winning streak dating back to a loss to Harvard in 1890. Princeton had outscored its opponents by a cumulative total of 264–14, and was seeking to avenge its 12–0 loss to Yale the previous year. A crowd of 40,000, the largest ever to see a football game up to that time, showed up at the Polo Grounds in New York to see the two teams take the field. Three-time Consensus All-American Phil King led Princeton into the game. He would later head the Princeton Football Association and help coach. King had just developed the double wingback formation with the ends deployed on the wings of the line.

From the double wingback formation, Princeton precisely executed a complete set of plays and completely befuddled the Yale eleven, captained by college football Hall of Famer Frank Hinkey. The New York Sun noted that “Princeton in 1893 had the finest offensive machine it had developed up to this time – a team with continuity of attack, the ability to pile first down upon first down.” Princeton was able to cross the goal once and held Yale scoreless, thus winning 6–0 and claiming the national championship.

However, the game did not pass without engendering some controversy. The New York Herald declared in a scathing commentary: "Thanksgiving Day is no longer a solemn festival to God for mercies given. It is a holiday granted by the State and the Nation to see a game of football. The kicker now is king and the people bow down to him. The gory nosed tackler, hero of a hundred scrimmages and half as many wrecked wedges, is the idol of the hour. With swollen face and bleeding head, daubed from crown to sole with the mud of Manhattan Field, he stands triumphant amid the cheers of thousands. What matters that the purpose of the day is perverted, that church is foregone, that family reunion is neglected, that dinner is delayed if not forgot. Has not Princeton played a mighty game with Yale and has not Princeton won? This is the modern Thanksgiving Day."

The Yale-Princeton Thanksgiving Day game of 1893 earned $13,000 for each school from gate receipts, as the big games became the primary source of revenue for the college's athletic programs.

Conference standings

The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:

1893 Colorado Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Colorado Mines $300  410
Colorado 110  230
Colorado Agricultural 130  130
Denver 020  120
  • $ Conference champion
1893 Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Purdue $400  521
Butler 100  100
DePauw 310  630
Butler 220  420
Wabash 130  240
Indiana 040  141
  • $ Conference champion
1893 Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the Northwest football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Minnesota $300  600
Wisconsin 110  420
Michigan 120  730
Northwestern 020  253
  • $ Conference champion
1893 Triangular Football League standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Dartmouth $200  430
  • $ Conference champion
1893 Western Interstate University Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Missouri +210  430
Kansas +210  250
Nebraska 120  321
Iowa 120  340
  • + Conference co-champions

Major independents

1893 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Princeton     1100
Fordham     400
Harvard     1210
Yale     1010
Colgate     302
Penn     1230
Penn State     410
Wesleyan     410
Washington & Jefferson     620
Swarthmore     621
Lehigh     730
Brown     630
Carlisle     210
Delaware     210
Frankin & Marshall     421
Navy     530
Bucknell     530
Bucknell     430
Amherst     761
Boston College     330
Geneva     221
Army     450
Williams     231
Tufts     470
Cornell     361
Worcester Tech     241
Boston University     120
Lafayette     360
Syracuse     491
Western Penn     140
MIT     150
Massachusetts     190
New Hampshire     010
Pittsburgh College     020
Rutgers     040
Maine     050
1893 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Case     400
Miami (OH)     300
Washburn     100
Baker     601
Oberlin     610
Hillsdale     410
Notre Dame     410
Buchtel     520
Butler     420
Michigan State Normal     420
Chicago     642
Beloit     430
Illinois     323
Lake Forest     323
Doane     220
Heidelberg     220
Wabash     330
Washington University     110
Ohio State     450
Wittenberg     230
Mount Union     120
Albion     140
Drake     021
Baldwin–Wallace     010
Ohio Wesleyan     010
Kalamazoo     020
Iowa Agricultural     030
Cincinnati     060
1893 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Maryland     600
Texas     400
Central     200
Howard     200
North Carolina A&M     200
Vanderbilt     610
Auburn     302
Virginia     820
Ole Miss     410
Centre     410
Trinity (NC)     310
VMI     310
Kentucky State College     521
Delaware     210
Guilford     210
West Virginia     210
William & Mary     210
Navy     530
Richmond     320
Georgia Tech     211
Georgetown     440
Sewanee     330
Furman     110
Georgia     221
Johns Hopkins     232
North Carolina     340
Tennessee     240
Tulane     120
Wake Forest     120
Hampden-Sydney     010
LSU     010
Mercer     010
Wofford     010
VAMC     020
Alabama     040
1893 Far West college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Wyoming     100
Stanford     801
Oregon Agricultural     510
California     511
USC     310
Washington     131
San Jose State     010

See also

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1894 college football season

The 1894 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1894–95 academic year.

1892 college football season

The 1892 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1892–93 academic year.

1891 college football season

The 1891 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1891–92 academic year.

1890 college football season

The 1890 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1890–91 academic year.

1890 Harvard Crimson football team American college football season

The 1890 Harvard Crimson football team was an American football team that represented Harvard University in the 1890 college football season. The team finished with an 11–0 record, shut out nine of eleven opponents, and outscored all opponents by a total of 555 to 12.

The 1886 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in the 1886 college football season. The team finished with a 7–0–1 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report and as a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis. They outscored their opponents 320 to 27.

1893 Princeton Tigers football team American college football season

The 1893 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in the 1893 college football season. The team finished with an 11–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and National Championship Foundation. They outscored their opponents 270 to 14.

The 1883 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1883 college football season. The team compiled a 9–0 record, shut out eight of nine opponents, and outscored all opponents, 540 to 2. The team was retroactively named as the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation, Billingsley Report, National Championship Foundation and Parke H. Davis.

The 1884 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1884 college football season. The team compiled an 8–0–1 record, shut out eight of nine opponents, and outscored all opponents, 495 to 10. The team was retroactively named as the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation and National Championship Foundation and as a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis.

The 1891 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1891 college football season. The team finished with a 13–0 record and a 488-0 season score. It was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis. Yale's 1891 season was part of a 37-game winning streak that began with the final game of the 1890 season and stopped at the end of the 1893 season.

1892 Yale Bulldogs football team American college football season

The 1892 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1892 college football season. In its fifth and final season under head coach Walter Camp, the team finished with a 13–0 record and outscored opponents by a total of 429 to 0. Mike Murphy was the team's trainer. The team is regarded as the 1892 national champion, having been selected retrospectively as such by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis. Yale's 1892 season was part of a 37-game winning streak that began with the final game of the 1890 season and stopped at the end of the 1893 season.

The 1901 Yale Bulldogs football team was an American football team that represented Yale University as an independent during the 1901 college football season. In its first season under head coach George S. Stillman, the team compiled an 11–1–1 record and outscored opponents by a total of 251 to 37.

The 1923 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1923 college football season. The Bulldogs finished with an undefeated 8–0 record under sixth-year head coach Tad Jones. Yale outscored its opponents by a combined score of 230 to 38, including a 40–0 victory over Georgia, a 31–10 victory over Army and shutout victories over rivals Princeton and Harvard. Two Yale players, tackle Century Milstead and fullback Bill Mallory, were consensus selections for the 1923 College Football All-America Team. The team was selected retroactively as a co-national champion by the Berryman QPRS system.

The 1899 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1899 college football season. The team compiled a 7–2–1 record, recorded eight shutouts, and outscored all opponents by a total of 191 to 16. The team defeated Wisconsin (6–0), Army (24–0), and Penn State (42–0), played a scoreless tie against Harvard, and lost to Columbia (0–5) and Princeton (10–11).

Princeton–Yale football rivalry

The Princeton–Yale football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Princeton Tigers of Princeton University and the Yale Bulldogs of Yale University. The football rivalry is among the oldest in American sports.

References

  1. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2015). "National Poll Rankings" (PDF). NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA. p. 107. Retrieved January 4, 2016.
  2. "1892 Yale Bulldogs Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 27, 2017.