1896

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1896 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1896
MDCCCXCVI
Ab urbe condita 2649
Armenian calendar 1345
ԹՎ ՌՅԽԵ
Assyrian calendar 6646
Bahá'í calendar 52–53
Balinese saka calendar 1817–1818
Bengali calendar 1303
Berber calendar 2846
British Regnal year 59  Vict. 1   60  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2440
Burmese calendar 1258
Byzantine calendar 7404–7405
Chinese calendar 乙未(Wood  Goat)
4592 or 4532
     to 
丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
4593 or 4533
Coptic calendar 1612–1613
Discordian calendar 3062
Ethiopian calendar 1888–1889
Hebrew calendar 5656–5657
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1952–1953
 - Shaka Samvat 1817–1818
 - Kali Yuga 4996–4997
Holocene calendar 11896
Igbo calendar 896–897
Iranian calendar 1274–1275
Islamic calendar 1313–1314
Japanese calendar Meiji 29
(明治29年)
Javanese calendar 1825–1826
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4229
Minguo calendar 16 before ROC
民前16年
Nanakshahi calendar 428
Thai solar calendar 2438–2439
Tibetan calendar 阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
2022 or 1641 or 869
     to 
阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
2023 or 1642 or 870

1896 ( MDCCCXCVI ) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar , the 1896th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 896th year of the 2nd millennium , the 96th year of the 19th century , and the 7th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1896, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Wednesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are ED, such as the years 1908, 1936, 1964, 1992, 2020, 2048, 2076, and 2116 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2004 and 2032 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in March and November. Common years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another in February.

Contents

Events

JanuaryMarch

January 5: Rontgen rays. Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen (1845--1923).jpg
January 5: Röntgen rays.
January 5: Rontgen X-ray. X-ray by Wilhelm Rontgen of Albert von Kolliker's hand - 18960123-02.jpg
January 5: Röntgen X-ray.

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 363 days remaining until the end of the year.

Jameson Raid raid on Transvaal Republic

The Jameson Raid was a botched raid against the South African Republic carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96. Paul Kruger was president of the republic at the time. The raid was intended to trigger an uprising by the primarily British expatriate workers in the Transvaal but failed to do so. The workers were called the Johannesburg conspirators. They were expected to recruit an army and prepare for an insurrection. The raid was ineffective and no uprising took place, but it was an inciting factor in the Second Boer War and the Second Matabele War.

Boer descendants of Dutch-speaking settlers in Southern Africa

Boer is the Dutch and Afrikaans noun for "farmer". In South African contexts, "Boers" refers to the descendants of the then Dutch-speaking settlers of the eastern Cape frontier in Southern Africa during the 18th and much of the 19th century. From 1652 to 1795 the Dutch East India Company controlled this area, but the United Kingdom incorporated it into the British Empire in 1806.

AprilJune

April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, the fifth in the early Julian, the first of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the second of five months to have a length of less than 31 days.

Svante Arrhenius Swedish chemist

Svante August Arrhenius was a Swedish scientist. Originally a physicist, but often referred to as a chemist, Arrhenius was one of the founders of the science of physical chemistry. He received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1903, becoming the first Swedish Nobel laureate, and in 1905 became director of the Nobel Institute where he remained until his death.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences is one of the royal academies of Sweden. Founded on June 2, 1739, it is an independent, non-governmental scientific organization which takes special responsibility for ptomoting the natural sciences and mathematics and strengthen their influence in society, whilst endeavouring to promote the exchange of ideas between various disciplines.

A picture of the restored Panathenaic Stadium, the site of the 1896 Summer Olympics Panathinaiko.jpg
A picture of the restored Panathenaic Stadium, the site of the 1896 Summer Olympics

June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 196 days remaining until the end of the year.

June 23 is the 174th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 191 days remaining until the end of the year.

Wilfrid Laurier 7th prime minister of Canada

Sir Henri Charles Wilfrid Laurier was the seventh prime minister of Canada, in office from 11 July 1896 to 6 October 1911.

JulySeptember

July 9 is the 190th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 175 days remaining until the end of the year.

William Jennings Bryan United States Secretary of State

William Jennings Bryan was an American orator and politician from Nebraska. Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, standing three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States. He also served in the United States House of Representatives and as the United States Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson. Just before his death he gained national attention for attacking the teaching of evolution in the Scopes Trial. Because of his faith in the wisdom of the common people, he was often called "The Great Commoner".

Cross of Gold speech

The Cross of Gold speech was delivered by William Jennings Bryan, a former United States Representative from Nebraska, at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago on July 9, 1896. In the address, Bryan supported bimetallism or "free silver", which he believed would bring the nation prosperity. He decried the gold standard, concluding the speech, "you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold". Bryan's address helped catapult him to the Democratic Party's presidential nomination; it is considered one of the greatest political speeches in American history.

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryFebruary

George Burns George Burns 1961.JPG
George Burns
Friedrich Hund Hund, Friedrich 1920er Gottingen.jpg
Friedrich Hund

MarchApril

Ira C. Eaker LTG Ira Eaker.jpg
Ira C. Eaker
Nikolay Semyonov Nikolay Semyonov Nobel.jpg
Nikolay Semyonov

MayJune

Mark W. Clark Mark Wayne Clark 1943.jpg
Mark W. Clark
Jorge Alessandri Jorge Alessandri Rodriguez.JPG
Jorge Alessandri
Wallis Simpson Wallis Simpson -1936.JPG
Wallis Simpson

JulyAugust

Thomas Playford IV Playford portrait 38.jpg
Thomas Playford IV
Trygve Lie Trygve Lie 1938.jpg
Trygve Lie
Jean Piaget Jean Piaget in Ann Arbor.png
Jean Piaget
Gerty Cori Gerty Theresa Cori.jpg
Gerty Cori
Arthur Calwell Arthur Calwell 1966.jpg
Arthur Calwell

SeptemberOctober

Adele Astaire Adele Astaire in 1919.jpg
Adele Astaire
F. Scott Fitzgerald F Scott Fitzgerald 1921.jpg
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Sandro Pertini Pertini ritratto.jpg
Sandro Pertini
Earle Clements Earle-Clements.jpg
Earle Clements

NovemberDecember

Carlos P. Garcia Carlos P Garcia photo.jpg
Carlos P. Garcia
Nobusuke Kishi Nobusuke Kishi Dec 14, 1956.jpg
Nobusuke Kishi
Mamie Eisenhower Mamie Eisenhower color photo portrait, White House, May 1954.jpg
Mamie Eisenhower
Jimmy Doolittle Lt. General James Doolittle, head and shoulders.jpg
Jimmy Doolittle

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Clara Schumann Clara Schumann 1878.jpg
Clara Schumann

JulyDecember

Harriet Beecher Stowe Harriet Beecher Stowe c1852.jpg
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Otto Lilienthal Otto-lilienthal.jpg
Otto Lilienthal
Alfred Nobel Alfred Nobel3.jpg
Alfred Nobel
Jose Rizal Jose rizal 01.jpg
Jose Rizal


Unknown date

Margaret Eleanor Parker Margaret Eleanor Parker.png
Margaret Eleanor Parker

Related Research Articles

1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1964th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 964th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1960s decade.

1947 Year

1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1947th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 947th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1940s decade.

1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1957th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 957th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1950s decade.

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1931st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 931st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1930s decade.

1939 Year

1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1939th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 939th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1930s decade. This year also marks the start of the Second World War, the largest and deadliest conflict in human history.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. A key event of this year was the sinking of the infamous RMS Titanic

1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1901st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 901st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1901, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1946th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 946th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1940s decade.

1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1902nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 902nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1902, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1910th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 910th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1910, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1953rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 953rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1950s decade.

1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1930th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 930th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1930s decade.

1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1934th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 934th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1930s decade.

1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1954th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 954th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1950s decade.

1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1950th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 950th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1950s decade.

References

  1. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 324–325. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  2. "Ashanti Expedition (1895-1896)", in The Victorians at War, 1815-1914: An Encyclopedia of British Military History, by Harold E. Raugh (ABC-CLIO, 2004) p30
  3. Slee, Christopher (1994). The Guinness Book of Lasts. Enfield: Guinness Publishing. ISBN   0-85112-783-5.
  4. The Great Dynamite Explosion, report by Mr. J.G. Blumberg, Fairmount School, Johannesburg, excerpt from the autobiography of Dutch immigrant Jan de Veer who came to South Africa in 1893.
  5. Dow Record Book Adds Another First. Philly.com. Retrieved 2013-07-08.
  6. Documents of the Senate of the State of New York: One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Session, 1913, Volume 25, p255
  7. "Twin Shaft Disaster Marker".
  8. "100 MINERS ENTOMBED - Twin Shaft, Pittston, Caves In and Few Escape. RESCUERS WORK IN VAIN Three Men Saved, but Little Hope for the Others. FRENZIED CITY AT PIT'S MOUTH Startled from Slumber to Hopeless Activity by an Explosion in the Early Morning. BOSSES ARE AMONG THE MISSING All the Workmen Available Were Trying to Brace Up a Section That Was Considered Dangerous. ONE HUNDRED MINERS ENTOMBED - Front Page - NYTimes.com". June 29, 1896.
  9. "Pennsylvania". Archived from the original on November 21, 2008.
  10. The Law Journal Reports for the Year 1896 (Stevens and Sons, Ltd., 1896), Volume 65, p247
  11. Miller, Charles (1971). The Lunatic Express. New York: Macdonald. ISBN   978-0-02-584940-2.
  12. "Clarkson Estate".
  13. Iiams, Thomas M. (1962). Dreyfus, Diplomatists and the Dual Alliance: Gabriel Hanotaux at the Quai D'Orsay (1894 1898), Geneva/Paris: Librairie Droz/Librairie Minard, p. 115
  14. Alois Anton Führer, Monograph on Buddha Sakyamuni's Birth-Place in the Nepalese Taral (Allahabad: The Government Press, 1897) p28