1898

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1898 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1898
MDCCCXCVIII
Ab urbe condita 2651
Armenian calendar 1347
ԹՎ ՌՅԽԷ
Assyrian calendar 6648
Bahá'í calendar 54–55
Balinese saka calendar 1819–1820
Bengali calendar 1305
Berber calendar 2848
British Regnal year 61  Vict. 1   62  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2442
Burmese calendar 1260
Byzantine calendar 7406–7407
Chinese calendar 丁酉(Fire  Rooster)
4594 or 4534
     to 
戊戌年 (Earth  Dog)
4595 or 4535
Coptic calendar 1614–1615
Discordian calendar 3064
Ethiopian calendar 1890–1891
Hebrew calendar 5658–5659
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1954–1955
 - Shaka Samvat 1819–1820
 - Kali Yuga 4998–4999
Holocene calendar 11898
Igbo calendar 898–899
Iranian calendar 1276–1277
Islamic calendar 1315–1316
Japanese calendar Meiji 31
(明治31年)
Javanese calendar 1827–1828
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4231
Minguo calendar 14 before ROC
民前14年
Nanakshahi calendar 430
Thai solar calendar 2440–2441
Tibetan calendar 阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
2024 or 1643 or 871
     to 
阳土狗年
(male Earth-Dog)
2025 or 1644 or 872

1898 ( MDCCCXCVIII ) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar , the 1898th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 898th year of the 2nd millennium , the 98th year of the 19th century , and the 9th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1898, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Saturday is any non-leap year that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Saturday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is B. The most recent year of such kind was 2011 and the next one will be 2022 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2017 and 2023 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in May. Leap years starting on Friday share this characteristic.

Contents

Events

1898 world map World 1898 empires colonies territory.png
1898 world map

JanuaryMarch

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States and thus also in the state of New York. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Manhattan Borough in New York City and county in New York, United States

Manhattan, often referred to locally as the City, is the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City and its economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and historical birthplace. The borough is coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. The borough consists mostly of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson, East, and Harlem rivers; several small adjacent islands; and Marble Hill, a small neighborhood now on the U.S. mainland, physically connected to the Bronx and separated from the rest of Manhattan by the Harlem River. Manhattan Island is divided into three informally bounded components, each aligned with the borough's long axis: Lower, Midtown, and Upper Manhattan.

February 15: USS Maine is sunk. USS Maine h60255a.jpg
February 15: USS Maine is sunk.

February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 311 days remaining until the end of the year.

Émile Zola French writer

Émile Édouard Charles Antoine Zola was a French novelist, playwright, journalist, the best-known practitioner of the literary school of naturalism, and an important contributor to the development of theatrical naturalism. He was a major figure in the political liberalization of France and in the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus, which is encapsulated in the renowned newspaper headline J'Accuse…! Zola was nominated for the first and second Nobel Prize in Literature in 1901 and 1902.

<i>JAccuse…!</i>

"J'Accuse...!" was an open letter published on 13 January 1898 in the newspaper L'Aurore by the influential writer Émile Zola.

AprilJune

April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 270 days remaining until the end of the year.

Annie Oakley American sharpshooter and exhibition shooter

Annie Oakley was an American sharpshooter and exhibition shooter. Her talent first came to light when at age 15 she won a shooting match against traveling-show marksman Frank E. Butler, whom she later married. The couple joined Buffalo Bill's Wild West show a few years later. Oakley became a renowned international star, performing before royalty and heads of state.

April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 253 days remaining until the end of the year.

The original flag of the Philippines as conceived by General Emilio Aguinaldo. The blue is of a lighter shade than the currently mandated royal blue, the sun has eight points as currently but many more rays and it has a mythical face. Philippines Flag Original.svg
The original flag of the Philippines as conceived by General Emilio Aguinaldo. The blue is of a lighter shade than the currently mandated royal blue, the sun has eight points as currently but many more rays and it has a mythical face.

June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 213 days remaining until the end of the year.

Trans-Mississippi Exposition

The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition was a world's fair held in Omaha, Nebraska from June 1 to November 1 of 1898. Its goal was to showcase the development of the entire West, stretching from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Coast. The Indian Congress was held concurrently. Over 2.6 million people came to Omaha to view the 4,062 exhibits during the five months of the Exposition. President William McKinley and William Jennings Bryan were among the dignitaries who attended at the invitation of Gurdon Wattles, the event's leader. 100,000 people assembled on the plaza to hear them speak. The Expo stretched over a 180-acre (0.73 km2) tract in North Omaha and featured a 2,000 feet (610 m)-long lagoon encircled by 21 classical buildings that featured fine and modern products from around the world.

Worlds fair Large international exhibition

A world's fair, world fair, world expo, universal exposition, or international exposition is a large international exhibition designed to showcase achievements of nations. These exhibitions vary in character and are held in different parts of the world. The most recent international exhibition, Expo 2017, was held in Astana, Kazakhstan. Dubai, UAE has been selected to host WORLD EXPO 2020. Osaka, Japan has been selected to host World Expo 2025.

JulySeptember

July 1 is the 182nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 183 days remaining until the end of the year.

Spanish–American War Conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States

The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of USS Maine in Havana harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. U.S. acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.

Battle of San Juan Hill decisive battle of the Spanish–American War

The Battle of San Juan Hill, also known as the battle for the San Juan Heights, was a decisive battle of the Spanish–American War. The San Juan heights was a north-south running elevation about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) east of Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. The names San Juan Hill and Kettle Hill were given to the location by the Americans. This fight for the heights was the bloodiest and most famous battle of the war. It was also the location of the so-called "greatest victory" for the Rough Riders, as stated by the press and its new commander, Theodore Roosevelt, who eventually became vice president and later president of the United States, and who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor in 2001 for his actions in Cuba.

OctoberDecember

November 26: blizzard. Boston-MA-blizzard-snow-train-November-27-1898-photo.jpg
November 26: blizzard.

Unknown dates

Births

JanuaryMarch

Gracie Fields Dame Gracie Fields Allan Warren.jpg
Gracie Fields
Kaj Munk Kaj Munk.jpg
Kaj Munk
Sergei Eisenstein Sergei Eisenstein 03.jpg
Sergei Eisenstein
Randolph Scott Randolph Scott-publicity.JPG
Randolph Scott
Denjiro Okochi Denjiro Okochi.jpg
Denjirō Ōkōchi
Bertolt Brecht Bertolt-Brecht.jpg
Bertolt Brecht
Leo Szilard Leo Szilard.jpg
Leó Szilárd
Enzo Ferrari Enzo Ferrari - Wheel of a racing car.jpg
Enzo Ferrari
Soong Mei-ling Soong May-ling giving a special radio broadcast.jpg
Soong Mei-ling
Eben Donges Donges cropped.jpg
Eben Dönges

AprilJune

Hastings Banda Dr HK Banda, first president of Malawi.jpg
Hastings Banda
Armand Hammer Armand Hammer 82.jpg
Armand Hammer
Jim Fouche Jacobus Johannes Fouche 1968.jpg
Jim Fouché

JulySeptember

Stefanos Stefanopoulos Stefanos Stefanopoulos 1965.jpg
Stefanos Stefanopoulos
Happy Chandler Happy Chandler - Harris and Ewing Crop.jpg
Happy Chandler
Isidor Isaac Rabi II Rabi.jpg
Isidor Isaac Rabi
Regis Toomey Regis Toomey 1981.jpg
Regis Toomey
Leopold Infeld Leopold Infeld 1960.jpg
Leopold Infeld
Alfons Gorbach Alfons Gorbach 1965.jpg
Alfons Gorbach
Giuseppe Saragat Giuseppe Saragat.jpg
Giuseppe Saragat
Howard Florey Howard Walter Florey 1945.jpg
Howard Florey
George Gershwin George Gershwin 1937.jpg
George Gershwin

OctoberDecember

William O. Douglas Justice William O Douglas.jpg
William O. Douglas
Leon Stukelj Leon Stukelj 1958 (2).jpg
Leon Štukelj
Karl Ziegler Karl Ziegler Nobel.jpg
Karl Ziegler
Gunnar Myrdal Gunnar Myrdal 1964 002 (cropped).jpg
Gunnar Myrdal
Baby Dodds Baby Dodds (Gottlieb 02051).jpg
Baby Dodds

Date unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Lewis Carroll Lewis Carroll photograph.jpg
Lewis Carroll
Matilda Joslyn Gage MatildaJoslynGage.jpeg
Matilda Joslyn Gage
William Ewart Gladstone Gladstone2.jpg
William Ewart Gladstone

JulyDecember

Otto von Bismarck Bundesarchiv Bild 183-R29818, Otto von Bismarck.jpg
Otto von Bismarck
Theodor Fontane Kurzbio fontane05.jpg
Theodor Fontane
Saint Charbel Makhluf Charbel.jpg
Saint Charbel Makhluf

Date Unknown

Related Research Articles

1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1964th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 964th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1960s decade.

1952 Year

1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1952nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 952nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1950s decade.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1957th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 957th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1950s decade.

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1931st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 931st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1930s decade.

1939 Year

1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1939th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 939th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1930s decade. This year also marks the start of the Second World War, the largest and deadliest conflict in human history.

1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1946th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 946th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1940s decade.

1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1905th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 905th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1905, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1903rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 903rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1903, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1902nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 902nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1902, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1900th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 900th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1900, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 13 days until February 28, 2100.

1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1895th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 895th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1895, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1991st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 991st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1990s decade.

1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1897th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 897th year of the 2nd millennium, the 97th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1897, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1962nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 962nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1960s decade.

1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1880th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 880th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1880, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1899th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 899th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1899, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1892nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 892nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1892, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1879th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 879th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1870s decade. As of the start of 1879, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1950th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 950th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1950s decade.

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  5. The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). "Letter to President William McKinley from Annie Oakley" Retrieved January 24, 2008.
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Sources