1899

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1899 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1899
MDCCCXCIX
Ab urbe condita 2652
Armenian calendar 1348
ԹՎ ՌՅԽԸ
Assyrian calendar 6649
Bahá'í calendar 55–56
Balinese saka calendar 1820–1821
Bengali calendar 1306
Berber calendar 2849
British Regnal year 62  Vict. 1   63  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2443
Burmese calendar 1261
Byzantine calendar 7407–7408
Chinese calendar 戊戌(Earth  Dog)
4595 or 4535
     to 
己亥年 (Earth  Pig)
4596 or 4536
Coptic calendar 1615–1616
Discordian calendar 3065
Ethiopian calendar 1891–1892
Hebrew calendar 5659–5660
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1955–1956
 - Shaka Samvat 1820–1821
 - Kali Yuga 4999–5000
Holocene calendar 11899
Igbo calendar 899–900
Iranian calendar 1277–1278
Islamic calendar 1316–1317
Japanese calendar Meiji 32
(明治32年)
Javanese calendar 1828–1829
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4232
Minguo calendar 13 before ROC
民前13年
Nanakshahi calendar 431
Thai solar calendar 2441–2442
Tibetan calendar 阳土狗年
(male Earth-Dog)
2025 or 1644 or 872
     to 
阴土猪年
(female Earth-Pig)
2026 or 1645 or 873

1899 ( MDCCCXCIX ) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar , the 1899th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 899th year of the 2nd millennium , the 99th year of the 19th century , and the 10th and last year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1899, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

Contents

Events

January–March

January 1: Cuba free. Cu-map.png
January 1: Cuba free.

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Cuba Country in the Caribbean

Cuba, officially the Republic of Cuba, is a country comprising the island of Cuba as well as Isla de la Juventud and several minor archipelagos. Cuba is located in the northern Caribbean where the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean meet. It is east of the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico), south of both the U.S. state of Florida and the Bahamas, west of Haiti and north of both Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. Havana is the largest city and capital; other major cities include Santiago de Cuba and Camagüey. The area of the Republic of Cuba is 110,860 square kilometres (42,800 sq mi). The island of Cuba is the largest island in Cuba and in the Caribbean, with an area of 105,006 square kilometres (40,543 sq mi), and the second-most populous after Hispaniola, with over 11 million inhabitants.

Queens Borough in New York City and county in New York, United States

Queens is the easternmost of the five boroughs of New York City. It is the largest borough geographically and is adjacent to the borough of Brooklyn at the southwestern end of Long Island. To its east is Nassau County. Queens also shares water borders with the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. Coterminous with Queens County since 1899, the borough of Queens is the second largest in population, with an estimated 2,358,582 residents in 2017, approximately 48% of them foreign-born. Queens County also is the second most populous county in the U.S. state of New York, behind Brooklyn, which is coterminous with Kings County. Queens is the fourth most densely populated county among New York City's boroughs, as well as in the United States. If each of New York City's boroughs were an independent city, Queens would be the nation's fourth most populous, after Los Angeles, Chicago, and Brooklyn. Queens is the most ethnically diverse urban area in the world.

January 21: Opel car. OpelLutzmann.jpg
January 21: Opel car.

January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 343 days remaining until the end of the year.

Melbourne City in Victoria, Australia

Melbourne is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Its name refers to an urban agglomeration of 9,992.5 km2 (3,858.1 sq mi), comprising a metropolitan area with 31 municipalities, and is also the common name for its city centre. The city occupies much of the coastline of Port Phillip bay and spreads into the hinterlands towards the Dandenong and Macedon ranges, Mornington Peninsula and Yarra Valley. It has a population of approximately 4.9 million, and its inhabitants are referred to as "Melburnians".

January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 342 days remaining until the end of the year.

March 6: Aspirin. Aspirin-skeletal.svg
March 6: Aspirin.

March 6- Princess Kaiulani, heiress to the deposed Hawaiian Throne Dies.

March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 300 days remaining until the end of the year.

Felix Hoffmann German chemist and creator of Aspirin

Felix Hoffmann was a German chemist notable for re-synthesizing diamorphine, which was popularized under the Bayer trade name of "heroin". He is also credited with synthesizing aspirin, though whether he did this under his own initiative or under the instruction of Arthur Eichengrün is contested.

Aspirin medication

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is a medication used to treat pain, fever, or inflammation. Specific inflammatory conditions which aspirin is used to treat include Kawasaki disease, pericarditis, and rheumatic fever. Aspirin given shortly after a heart attack decreases the risk of death. Aspirin is also used long-term to help prevent further heart attacks, ischaemic strokes, and blood clots in people at high risk. It may also decrease the risk of certain types of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer. For pain or fever, effects typically begin within 30 minutes. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and works similarly to other NSAIDs but also suppresses the normal functioning of platelets.

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Births

January

S. W. R. D. Bandaranaike Official Photographic Portrait of S.W.R.D.Bandaranayaka (1899-1959).jpg
S. W. R. D. Bandaranaike
Paul Hermann Müller Paul Hermann Müller nobel.jpg
Paul Hermann Müller
Paul-Henri Spaak Bundesarchiv Bild 183-39998-0427, Paul-Henri Spaak.jpg
Paul-Henri Spaak
Max Theiler Max Theiler nobel.jpg
Max Theiler

February

Café Filho Cafe Filho.jpg
Café Filho
Mildred Trotter Mildred Trotter (1899-1991).jpg
Mildred Trotter
Ramon Novarro Ramon Novarro.jpg
Ramon Novarro
Cevdet Sunay Cevdet sunay.jpg
Cevdet Sunay
Lillian Disney LilianBounds1951.jpg
Lillian Disney
Erich Kästner Erich Kästner 1961.jpg
Erich Kästner

March

King Frederick IX of Denmark Frederick IX of Denmark.jpg
King Frederick IX of Denmark
Gloria Swanson Gloria Swanson - 1950.jpg
Gloria Swanson

April

Walter Lantz Walter Lantz 1990 photo D Ramey Logan.jpg
Walter Lantz
Duke Ellington Duke Ellington restored.jpg
Duke Ellington

May

Fred Astaire Astaire, Fred - Never Get Rich.jpg
Fred Astaire
Suzanne Lenglen Suzanne Lenglen 02.jpg
Suzanne Lenglen

June

Fritz Albert Lipmann Portrait of Fritz Albert Lipmann (1899-1986), Biochemist (2551001689).jpg
Fritz Albert Lipmann

July

George Cukor George Cukor - 1946.jpg
George Cukor
James Cagney James cagney promo photo.jpg
James Cagney
Ernest Hemingway ErnestHemingway.jpg
Ernest Hemingway
Gustav Heinemann Bundesarchiv Bild 146-2007-0037, Gustav Heinemann.jpg
Gustav Heinemann

August

P. L. Travers PL Travers.jpg
P. L. Travers
Alfred Hitchcock Hitchcock, Alfred 02.jpg
Alfred Hitchcock

September

October

Franz Jonas Franz Jonas 1965.jpg
Franz Jonas
Pat O'Brien PatO'Brien1972.jpg
Pat O'Brien
Harold Abrahams Harold Abrahams 1921.jpg
Harold Abrahams
Noël Coward Noël Coward 01.jpg
Noël Coward
Aleksander Zawadzki Aleksander Zawadzki 01.jpg
Aleksander Zawadzki
Martin Luther King Sr. Martin Luther King Sr, c1977-81.jpg
Martin Luther King Sr.
Humphrey Bogart Humphrey Bogart 1945.JPG
Humphrey Bogart
Trinidad Roxas Trinidad Roxas (Malacanang photo).jpg
Trinidad Roxas

November

December

Date unknown

Deaths

January–June

Alfred Sisley Alfred Sisley photo full.jpg
Alfred Sisley
Paul Reuter Paul Julius Reuter 1869.jpg
Paul Reuter
Emma Hardinge Britten Emma Hardinge Britten 1884.png
Emma Hardinge Britten
Antonio Luna Antonio luna small.jpg
Antonio Luna

July–December

Robert Bunsen Robert Bunsen 02.jpg
Robert Bunsen
Garret Hobart Garret Augustus Hobart.jpg
Garret Hobart
Gregorio del Pilar General Gregorio del Pilar 1.jpg
Gregorio del Pilar

Date unknown

Frances Laughton Mace FRANCES LAUGHTON MACE A woman of the century (page 493 crop).jpg
Frances Laughton Mace

Related Research Articles

1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1911 Year

1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1911th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 911th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1911, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1931st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 931st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1930s decade.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1901st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 901st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1901, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1903rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 903rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1903, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1907th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 907th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1907, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1906th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 906th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1906, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1902nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 902nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1902, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1900th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 900th year of the 2nd millennium, the 100th and last year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1900, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. As of March 1, when the Julian calendar acknowledged a leap day and the Gregorian calendar did not, the Julian calendar fell one day further behind, bringing the difference to 13 days until February 28, 2100.

1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1896th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 896th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1896, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1895th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 895th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1895, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1910th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 910th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1910, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1897th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 897th year of the 2nd millennium, the 97th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1897, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1881st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 881st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1881, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1898th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 898th year of the 2nd millennium, the 98th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1898, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1930th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 930th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1930s decade.

1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1934th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 934th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1930s decade.

References

  1. "Motoring Firsts". National Motor Museum Trust. Archived from the original on August 21, 2010. Retrieved 2010-08-26.
  2. Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  3. Carruth, Gordon, ed. (1962). The Encyclopedia of American Facts and Dates (3rd ed.). Thomas Y. Crowell. pp. 384–387.
  4. Volkert, Klaus, ed. (2015). David Hilbert: Grundlagen der Geometrie. Springer. p. ix; Grattan-Guinness, Ivor (2005). Landmark Writings in Western Mathematics 1640-1940 Elsevier. p. 713.
  5. Inventors: Paperclip.
  6. Lewenson, Sandra B. (2013). Taking Charge: Nursing, Suffrage, and Feminism in America, 1873-1920. Routledge. p. 95.
  7. Henning, Joseph M. (2000). Outposts of Civilization: Race, Religion, and the Formative Years of American-Japanese Relations. New York University Press. p. 134.
  8. Berton, Pierre (1972). Klondike: The Last Great Gold Rush, 1896-1899. Anchor Canada.
  9. C. E. Borchgrevink, First on the Antarctic Continent: Being an Account of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1898-1900 (London: George Newnes, Ltd., 1901)
  10. "Professional Information". The Major Taylor Society. Retrieved 2012-01-23.
  11. Auclair, Philippe (2015-01-06). "Only in Marseille: where ultras rule and temptation is never far away | Philippe Auclair". The Guardian. ISSN   0261-3077 . Retrieved 2017-11-06.
  12. "R.M.S. Oceanic (II)". Jeff Newman. Archived from the original on September 19, 2009. Retrieved 2010-01-18.
  13. "Congratulations to the Glasgow School of Art as they celebrate 100th anniversary of the Mackintosh Building". Museums Galleries Scotland. 15 December 2009. Retrieved 2010-07-07.
  14. "Big Rock Fell". Green Bay, Wisconsin: Green Bay Semi-Weekly Gazette. 27 December 1899. p. 1. Retrieved 15 July 2017 via newspapers.com.
  15. Fischer, Steven R., Island at the End of the World, p. 153
  16. "Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa". World Digital Library . 1908. Retrieved 2013-09-24.