1900 Penn Quakers football team

Last updated
1900 Penn Quakers football
ConferenceIndependent
1900 record12–1
Head coach
Captain Truxtun Hare
Home stadium Franklin Field
Seasons
  1899
1901  
1900 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Yale     1200
Penn     1210
Harvard     1010
Cornell     1020
Geneva     511
Lafayette     920
Syracuse     721
Princeton     830
Fordham     311
Army     731
Brown     731
Columbia     731
Villanova     522
Washington & Jefferson     631
Swarthmore     632
Holy Cross     531
Carlisle     641
Dickinson     540
Western Univ. of Penn     540
Bucknell     441
Vermont     441
Rutgers     440
Lehigh     560
Frankin & Marshall     450
Temple     341
Pittsburgh College     231
Penn State     461
Amherst     471
Dartmouth     242
NYU     361
Tufts     361
Wesleyan     361
New Hampshire     151
Colgate     280
CCNY     010

The 1900 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1900 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 12–1 record in their ninth year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, George Washington Woodruff. Significant games included victories over Penn State (17–5), Chicago (41–0), Carlisle (16–6), and Navy (28–6), and a loss to Harvard (17–5). The 1900 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 335 to 45. [1] [2] Four Penn players received recognition on the 1900 College Football All-America Team: guard Truxtun Hare (consensus 1st-team All-American); [3] tackle Blondy Wallace (Walter Camp, 2nd team); guard John Teas (Camp, 3rd team); and fullback Josiah McCracken (Camp, 3rd team). [4]

Schedule

DateOpponentSiteResult
September 29 Lehigh W 27–6
October 3 Franklin & Marshall
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 47–0
October 6 Haverford
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 38–0
October 10 Dickinson
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 35–0
October 13 Brown
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 12–0
October 17 Penn State
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 17–5
October 20 Columbia
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 30–0
October 27 Chicago
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 41–0
November 3at Harvard L 5–17
November 10 Lafayette
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 12–5
November 17 Carlisle
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 16–6
November 21at Navy W 28–6
November 29 Cornell
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA (rivalry)
W 27–0

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1901 College Football All-America Team

The 1901 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various individuals who chose College Football All-America Teams for the 1901 college football season. The only two individuals who have been recognized as "official" selectors by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) for the 1901 season are Walter Camp and Caspar Whitney, who had originated the College Football All-America Team 13 years earlier in 1889. Camp's 1901 All-America Team was published in Collier's Weekly, and Whitney's selections were published in Outing magazine.

1902 College Football All-America Team

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1900 College Football All-America Team

The 1900 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various individuals who chose College Football All-America Teams for the 1900 college football season. The only two individuals who have been recognized as "official" selectors by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) for the 1900 season are Walter Camp and Caspar Whitney, who had originated the College Football All-America Team eleven years earlier in 1889. Camp's 1900 All-America Team was published in Collier's Weekly, and Whitney's selections were published in Outing magazine.

Penn Quakers football

The Penn Quakers football program is the college football team at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The Penn Quakers have competed in the Ivy League since its inaugural season of 1956, and are a Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Penn has played in 1,364 football games, the most of any school in any division. Penn plays its home games at historic Franklin Field, the oldest football stadium in the US. All Penn games are broadcast on WNTP or WFIL radio.

The 1900 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1900 college football season. In their fourth and final season under head coach Herman Koehler, the Cadets compiled a 7–3–1 record, shut out seven opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 109 to 68. The team's three losses came in games against Harvard (29–0), national champion Yale (18–0), and Navy (11–7).

The 1901 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1901 college football season. In their first and only season under head coach Leon Kromer, the Cadets compiled a 5–1–2 record, shut out four opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 98 to 22. The team's only loss was by a 6 to 0 score against an undefeated Harvard team that has been recognized as a co-national champion for the 1901 season. The Cadets also tied with Yale (5–5) and Princeton (6–6). In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Cadets defeated the Midshipmen by an 11 to 5 score.

1914 Illinois Fighting Illini football team American college football season

The 1914 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois in the 1914 college football season. The Fighting Illini compiled a 7–0 record, claim a national championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 224 to 22. The team was retroactively selected as the national champion for 1914 by the Billingsley Report and as a co-national champion with Army by Parke H. Davis.

The 1909 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1909 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 7–1–2 record in their first year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, Andy Smith. Their only loss was to Michigan by a 12 to 6 score, a game that snapped Penn's 23-game winning streak and marked the first time a Western team had defeated one of the "Big Four". Other significant games included a 12 to 0 victory over West Virginia, a 3-3 tie with Penn State, a 29 to 6 victory over Carlisle, and a 17 to 6 victory over Cornell. They outscored their opponents by a combined total of 146 to 38. End Harry Braddock was the only Penn player to receive All-America honors in 1909, receiving second-team honors from Walter Camp.

The 1906 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1906 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 7–2–3 record in their fifth year under head coach Carl S. Williams. Significant games included a 24 to 6 loss to the Carlisle Indians, a 17 to 0 victory over Michigan, and a scoreless tie with Cornell The 1906 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 186 to 58.

The 1905 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1905 college football season. The Quakers finished with an undefeated 12–0–1 record in their fourth year under head coach Carl S. Williams. Significant games included a 6 to 0 victory over the Carlisle Indians, a 12 to 6 victory over Harvard, a 23 to 0 victory over Columbia, a 6 to 5 victory over Cornell, and a 6–6 tie with Lafayette. The 1905 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 259 to 33.

The 1903 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1903 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 9–3 record in their second year under head coach Carl S. Williams. Significant games included victories over Penn State (39–0), Brown (30–0), and Cornell (42–0), and losses to Columbia (18–6), Harvard (17–10), and Carlisle (16–6). The 1903 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 370 to 57. Guard Frank Piekarski was the only Penn player to receive recognition on the 1903 College Football All-America Team; Piekarski received third-team honors from Walter Camp.

The 1902 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1902 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 9–4 record in their first year under head coach Carl S. Williams. Significant games included victories over Penn State (17–0), Columbia (17–0), and Cornell (12–11), and losses to Navy (10–6), Harvard (11–0), and Carlisle (5–9). The 1902 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 157 to 68. Three Penn players received recognition on the 1902 College Football All-America Team: end Sol Metzger ; tackle Robert Torrey ; and center James F. McCabe.

The 1901 Penn Quakers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Pennsylvania as an independent during the 1901 college football season. In its tenth season under head coach George Washington Woodruff, the team compiled a 10–5 record and outscored opponents by a total of 203 to 121. Significant games included victories over Penn State (23–6), Chicago (11–0), and Carlisle (16–14), and losses to Navy (6–5), Harvard (33–6), and Army (24–0).

The 1896 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1896 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 14–1 record in their fifth year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, George Washington Woodruff. Significant games included victories over Navy (8–0), Carlisle (21–0), Penn State (27–0), Harvard (8–6), and Cornell (32–10), and its sole loss against undefeated national champion Lafayette (6–4). The 1896 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 326 to 24.

The 1892 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1892 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 15–1 record in their first year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, George Washington Woodruff. Significant games included victories over Penn State (20–0), Navy (16–0), Lafayette, and Princeton (6–4), and its sole loss to undefeated national champion Yale (28–0). The 1892 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 405 to 52. Penn halfback Harry Thayer was selected by both Walter Camp and Caspar Whitney as a first-team player on the 1892 College Football All-America Team.

The 1891 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1891 college football season. The Quakers finished with an 11–2 record in their fourth year under head coach E. O. Wagenhorst. Significant games included victories over Rutgers (32–6), Lafayette, and Lehigh, and losses to Princeton (24–0) and undefeated national champion Yale (48–0). The 1891 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 267 to 109. Penn center John Adams was selected by Caspar Whitney as a first-team player on the 1891 College Football All-America Team.

The 1917 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1917 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 9–2 record in their second year under head coach Bob Folwell. Significant games included victories over Michigan (16–0), Carlisle (26–0), and Cornell (37–0), and losses to undefeated national champion Georgia Tech (41–0) and Pittsburgh (14–6). The 1917 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 245 to 71.

1921 Lafayette football team American college football season

The 1921 Lafayette football team represented Lafayette College in the 1921 college football season. Lafayette shut out five of its nine opponents and finished with an undefeated 9–0 record in their third year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, Jock Sutherland. Significant games included victories over Pittsburgh (6–0), Penn (38–6), and Lehigh (28–6). The 1921 Lafayette team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 274 to 26. Lafayette guard Frank Schwab was a consensus first-team selection on the 1921 College Football All-America Team. The team also included fullback George Seasholtz, who went on to play in the National Football League. The team was retroactively selected as a 1921 co-national champion by the Boand System and Parke H. Davis.

The 1900 Lafayette football team represented Lafayette College in the 1900 college football season. Lafayette shut out seven opponents and finished with a 9–2 record in their second year under head coach Samuel B. Newton. Significant games included victories over Lehigh, and Cornell (17–0), and losses to Princeton (0–5) and Penn (5–12). The 1900 Lafayette team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 214 to 25.

1915 Illinois Fighting Illini football team American college football season

The 1915 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1915 college football season. In their third season under head coach Robert Zuppke, the Illini compiled a 5–0–2 record and finished as co-champions of the Western Conference. Center John W. Watson was the team captain.

References

  1. "1900 Pennsylvania Quakers Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 23, 2015.
  2. "Pennsylvania Yearly Results (1900-1904)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved November 23, 2015.
  3. "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 4. Retrieved August 16, 2014.
  4. "Walter Camp's 1900 All America Selections". Capital Times. November 23, 1930.