1901 college football season

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The 1901 college football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing Michigan, Yale, and Harvard as having been selected retrospectively as national champions. [1] [lower-alpha 1] [lower-alpha 2] Harvard beat Yale 220 the last game of the year.

Contents

  1. The NCAA Record Book states "Yale" for 1901 as having been solely selected by Parke Davis, which is an error that has been perpetuated since the first appearance of Parke Davis' selections in the NCAA book about 1995. [2] [3]
  2. Parke Davis' selection for 1901, as published in Spalding's Foot Ball Guide (to which he was a contributor until his death) for 1934 and 1935, was Harvard. [2] [3]

Conference and program changes

School1900 Conference1901 Conference
Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets SIAA Independent
Louisiana Industrial Bulldogs Program EstablishedIndependent
Oklahoma A&M Aggies Program establishedIndependent
Stetson Hatters Program establishedIndependent

Rose Bowl

The very first collegiate football bowl game was played following the 1901 season. Originally titled the "Tournament East-West football game" what is now known as the Rose Bowl Game was first played on January 1, 1902, in Pasadena, California. Michigan defeated Stanford 49–0.

Conference standings

Major conference standings

1901 Colorado Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Colorado $200  511
Colorado College 210  510
Colorado Mines 120  140
Colorado Agricultural 020  120
  • $ Conference champion
  • Colorado vs. Colorado Agricultural game not played due to alleged amateurism violation. [4]
1901 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Vanderbilt $400  611
Clemson 201  311
LSU 210  510
North Carolina 210  720
Tulane 210  420
Alabama 212  212
Auburn 221  231
Tennessee 112  332
Mississippi A&M 120  221
Cumberland (TN) 010  010
Kentucky State 020  261
Georgia 032  152
Ole Miss 040  240
  • $ Conference champion
1901 Triangular Football League standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Williams $200     
  • $ Conference champion
1901 Western Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Michigan +400  1100
Wisconsin +200  900
Minnesota 310  911
Illinois 420  820
Northwestern 320  821
Indiana 120  630
Purdue 031  441
Chicago 041  862
Iowa 030  630
  • + Conference co-champions

Independents

1901 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Harvard     1200
Yale     1111
Cornell     1110
Dartmouth     1010
Massachusetts     910
Princeton     911
Syracuse     710
Holy Cross     711
Geneva     611
Army     512
Western U. of Penn     721
Washington & Jefferson     621
Lafayette     930
Frankin & Marshall     731
Penn     1050
Buffalo     420
Columbia     850
Fordham     211
Penn State     530
Bucknell     640
Temple     320
NYU     431
Tufts     661
Vermont     551
Dickinson     340
Carlisle     571
Amherst     462
Brown     471
Villanova     230
Wesleyan     361
Pittsburgh College     120
Colgate     250
Boston College     180
Lehigh     1110
New Hampshire     060
Rutgers     070
1901 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
North Dakota Agricultural     700
Marquette     401
Notre Dame     811
Ohio Wesleyan     820
Nebraska     620
Ohio     612
Doane     310
Haskell     620
Lake Forest     1050
Ohio State     531
Washington University     531
Ohio Medical     531
Iowa State Normal     532
Beloit     533
Washburn     323
Carthage     110
Drake     440
Detroit College     330
Mount Union     551
Wittenberg     440
Kansas State     341
Michigan Agricultural     341
Iowa State     262
Kansas     352
Wabash     470
Fairmount     360
Heidelberg     131
Cincinnati     141
Case     270
Missouri     161
Butler     010
Chicago Eclectic Medical     030
1901 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Southwestern Louisiana Industrial     200
Stetson     100
Georgia Tech     401
Marshall     201
Kentucky University     711
VPI     610
Nashville     611
Virginia     820
Texas     821
Davidson     420
Baylor     530
Gallaudet     422
Sewanee     422
William & Mary     211
VMI     430
Navy     641
Oklahoma     320
West Virginia     320
Delaware     540
Georgetown     332
Spring Hill     001
Oklahoma A&M     230
South Carolina     340
Arkansas     350
Add-Ran     121
Furman     121
Chilocco     250
North Carolina A&M     120
Texas A&M     140
Richmond     160
Maryland     170
Florida Agricultural     010
Kendall     010
1901 Far West college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Wyoming     100
California     901
Arizona     410
Washington Agricultural     410
Washington     430
Utah     310
Montana Agricultural     210
New Mexico A&M     210
Utah Agricultural     320
Stanford     322
Nevada State     330
Oregon     341
Montana     230
New Mexico     031
USC     010

Minor conferences

ConferenceChampion(s)Record
Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association Olivet 7–0

Awards and honors

All-Americans

The consensus All-America team included:

PositionNameHeightWeight (lbs.)ClassHometownTeam
QB Charles Dudley Daly 5'7"152Jr. Boston, Massachusetts Army
HB Robert Kernan Jr. Brooklyn, New York Harvard
HB Harold Weekes 5'10"178Jr. Oyster Bay, New York Columbia
HB Bill Morley 5'10"166Sr. Cimarron, New Mexico Columbia
FB Blondy Graydon Jr. Cincinnati, Ohio Harvard
E Dave Campbell 6'0"171Sr. Waltham, Massachusetts Harvard
E Ralph Tipton Davis 5'7"168So. Blossburg, Pennsylvania Princeton
T Oliver Cutts Sr. North Anson, Maine Harvard
T Paul Bunker 5'11"186Jr. Alpena, Michigan Army
G Bill Warner 6'4"210Jr. Springville, New York Cornell
G William George Lee Sr. Leavenworth, Kansas Harvard
C Henry Holt Jr. Spuyten Duyvil, Bronx, New York Yale
C Walter E. Bachman Sr. Phillipsburg, New Jersey Lafayette
G Charles A. Barnard Sr. Washington, D. C. Harvard
G Sanford Hunt So. Irvington, New Jersey Cornell
T Crawford Blagden Sr. New York, New York Harvard
E Edward Bowditch So. Albany, New York Harvard
E Neil Snow 5'8"190Sr. Detroit, Michigan Michigan

Statistical leaders

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References

  1. Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book (PDF). Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2009. p. 70. Retrieved 2009-10-16.
  2. Okeson, Walter R., ed. (1934). Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 1934. New York: American Sports Publishing Co. p. 206.
  3. Okeson, Walter R., ed. (1935). Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 1935. New York: American Sports Publishing Co. p. 233.
  4. "2015 Media Guide" (PDF). CUBuffs.com. Colorado Athletic Department. 2015. p. 144. Retrieved January 4, 2018.