1904

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1904 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1904
MCMIV
Ab urbe condita 2657
Armenian calendar 1353
ԹՎ ՌՅԾԳ
Assyrian calendar 6654
Bahá'í calendar 60–61
Balinese saka calendar 1825–1826
Bengali calendar 1311
Berber calendar 2854
British Regnal year 3  Edw. 7   4  Edw. 7
Buddhist calendar 2448
Burmese calendar 1266
Byzantine calendar 7412–7413
Chinese calendar 癸卯(Water  Rabbit)
4600 or 4540
     to 
甲辰年 (Wood  Dragon)
4601 or 4541
Coptic calendar 1620–1621
Discordian calendar 3070
Ethiopian calendar 1896–1897
Hebrew calendar 5664–5665
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1960–1961
 - Shaka Samvat 1825–1826
 - Kali Yuga 5004–5005
Holocene calendar 11904
Igbo calendar 904–905
Iranian calendar 1282–1283
Islamic calendar 1321–1322
Japanese calendar Meiji 37
(明治37年)
Javanese calendar 1833–1834
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar 4237
Minguo calendar 8 before ROC
民前8年
Nanakshahi calendar 436
Thai solar calendar 2446–2447
Tibetan calendar 阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
2030 or 1649 or 877
     to 
阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
2031 or 1650 or 878

1904 ( MCMIV ) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar , the 1904th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 904th year of the 2nd millennium , the 4th year of the 20th century , and the 5th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1904, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year is a calendar year containing an additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Friday is any year with 366 days that begins on Friday 1 January and ends on Saturday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are CB, such as the years 1808, 1836, 1864, 1892, 1904, 1932, 1960, 1988, 2016, 2044, 2072, 2112, 2140, 2168 and 2196 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2000 and 2028 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Tuesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this leap year occurs in May. Common years starting on Saturday share this characteristic.

Contents

Events

January

February 7: Aftermath of the Great Baltimore Fire. Baltimore fire aftermath.jpg
February 7: Aftermath of the Great Baltimore Fire.

January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 358 days remain until the end of the year.

A distress signal, also known as a distress call, is an internationally recognized means for obtaining help. Distress signals are communicated by transmitting radio signals, displaying a visually observable item or illumination, or making a sound audible from a distance.

CQD is one of the first distress signals adopted for radio use. On January 7, 1904 the Marconi International Marine Communication Company issued "Circular 57", which specified that, for the company's installations, beginning February 1, 1904 "the call to be given by ships in distress or in any way requiring assistance shall be 'C.Q.D.'".

February

February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 327 days remain until the end of the year.

Great Baltimore Fire 1904 fire in Baltimore, Maryland, United States

The Great Baltimore Fire raged in Baltimore, Maryland, United States on Sunday, February 7 and Monday, February 8, 1904. 1,231 firefighters helped bring the blaze under control, both professional paid Truck and Engine companies from the Baltimore City Fire Department (B.C.F.D.) and volunteers from the surrounding counties and outlying towns of Maryland, as well as out-of-state units that arrived on the major railroads. It destroyed much of central Baltimore, including over 1,500 buildings covering an area of some 140 acres (57 ha). From North Howard Street in the west and southwest, the flames spread north through the retail shopping area as far as Fayette Street and began moving eastward, pushed along by the prevailing winds. Narrowly missing the new 1900 Circuit Courthouse, fire passed the historic Battle Monument Square from 1815-27 at North Calvert Street, and the quarter-century old Baltimore City Hall on Holliday Street; and finally spread further east to the Jones Falls stream which divided the downtown business district from the old East Baltimore tightly-packed residential neighborhoods of Jonestown and newly named "Little Italy". The fire's wide swath burned as far south as the wharves and piers lining the north side of the old "Basin" of the Northwest Branch of the Baltimore Harbor and Patapsco River facing along Pratt Street. It is considered historically the third worst conflagration in an American city, surpassed only by the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, and the San Francisco Earthquake and Fire of 1906. Other major urban disasters that were comparable were the Galveston Hurricane of 1900 and most recently, Hurricane Katrina that hit New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico coast in August 2005.

Port Arthur from Gold Hill Port Arthur from Gold Hill.jpg
Port Arthur from Gold Hill

February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 326 days remain until the end of the year.

February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 325 days remain until the end of the year.

Battle of Port Arthur 1904 naval battle of the Russo-Japanese War

The Battle of Port Arthur of Monday 8 February – Tuesday 9 February 1904 marked the commencement of the Russo-Japanese War. It began with a surprise night attack by a squadron of Japanese destroyers on the neutral Russian fleet anchored at Port Arthur, Manchuria, and continued with an engagement the following morning; further skirmishing off Port Arthur would continue until May 1904. The attack ended inconclusively, though the war resulted in a decisive Japanese victory.

March

March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 305 days remain until the end of the year.

Glenn Miller American big band musician, arranger, composer, and bandleader

Alton Glenn Miller was an American big-band trombonist, arranger, composer, and bandleader in the swing era. He was the best-selling recording artist from 1939 to 1943, leading one of the best-known big bands. Miller's recordings include "In the Mood", "Moonlight Serenade", "Pennsylvania 6-5000", "Chattanooga Choo Choo", "A String of Pearls", "At Last", "(I've Got a Gal In) Kalamazoo", "American Patrol", "Tuxedo Junction", "Elmer's Tune", and "Little Brown Jug". In just four years Glenn Miller scored 16 number-one records and 69 top ten hits—more than Elvis Presley and the Beatles did in their careers. While he was traveling to entertain U.S. troops in France during World War II, Miller's aircraft disappeared in bad weather over the English Channel.

March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 303 days remain until the end of the year.

April

April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 269 days remain until the end of the year.

Joseph F. Smith President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Joseph Fielding Smith Sr. was an American religious leader who served as the sixth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was the nephew of Joseph Smith, the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement, and was the last president of the LDS Church to have known him personally.

Second Manifesto 1904 declaration by Joseph F. Smith, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, stating the church was no longer sanctioning polygamy and that those entering into or solemnizing polygamy would be excommunicated

The "Second Manifesto" was a 1904 declaration made by Joseph F. Smith, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in which Smith stated the church was no longer sanctioning marriages that violated the laws of the land and set down the principle that those entering into or solemnizing polygamous marriages would be excommunicated from the church.

May

June

July

1904 Summer Olympics 1904summerolympicsposter.jpg
1904 Summer Olympics

August

September

October

November

November 8: Republican Theodore Roosevelt is elected President of the United States by defeating Democrat Alton B. Parker. President Theodore Roosevelt, 1904.jpg
November 8: Republican Theodore Roosevelt is elected President of the United States by defeating Democrat Alton B. Parker.
November 24: caterpillar track Leclerc p1040868.jpg
November 24: caterpillar track

December

Date unknown

Births

January

Ray Bolger The Wizard of Oz Ray Bolger 1939.jpg
Ray Bolger
Cary Grant Grant, Cary (Suspicion) 01 Crisco edit.jpg
Cary Grant

February

Keith Holyoake Keith Holyoake (1960).jpg
Keith Holyoake
Jimmy Dorsey Jimmy Dorsey Billboard 2.jpg
Jimmy Dorsey

March

Dr. Seuss Ted Geisel NYWTS 2 crop.jpg
Dr. Seuss
Joan Crawford Joan Crawford - 1936 - Hurrell.JPG
Joan Crawford

April

Sharkey Bonano SharkeyBandstand1950Kubrick.JPG
Sharkey Bonano
John Gielgud Sir John Gielgud actor.jpg
John Gielgud
J. Robert Oppenheimer JROppenheimer-LosAlamos.jpg
J. Robert Oppenheimer

May

Salvador Dali Salvador Dali 1939.jpg
Salvador Dalí
Fats Waller Fats Waller edit.jpg
Fats Waller
Robert Montgomery RobertMontgomeryApr1939.jpg
Robert Montgomery

June

Johnny Weissmuller Johny Weissmuller-publicity.JPG
Johnny Weissmuller
Ralph Bellamy Ralph Bellamy still.jpg
Ralph Bellamy

July

Gordon Gunson Gordon Gunson.jpg
Gordon Gunson
Pablo Neruda Pablo Neruda 1963.jpg
Pablo Neruda
Pavel Cherenkov Cerenkov.jpg
Pavel Cherenkov

August

Dolores del Rio Dolores del Rio.jpg
Dolores del Río
Jay Novello Jay Novello in This Rebel Breed.jpg
Jay Novello
Christopher Isherwood Christopher Isherwood 6 Allan Warren.jpg
Christopher Isherwood
Werner Forssmann Werner Forssmann nobel.jpg
Werner Forssmann

September

Greer Garson Greer Garson-publicity.JPG
Greer Garson

October

November

Michael Ramsey Michael Ramsey 1974.jpg
Michael Ramsey
Lillian Copeland Lillian Copeland 1938.jpg
Lillian Copeland

December

Clarence Nash Clarence Nash San Diego Comic Con 1982 crop.jpg
Clarence Nash
George Stevens George Stevens with Oscar for Giant.jpg
George Stevens

Date unknown

Deaths

January

Blessed Laura Vicuna Laura Vicuna.jpg
Blessed Laura Vicuña
Frederick I, Duke of Anhalt Friedrich I Anhalt.jpg
Frederick I, Duke of Anhalt
Elphege Gravel Elphege Gravel.png
Elphège Gravel

February

Vladimir Markovnikov VladimirMarkovnikov.jpg
Vladimir Markovnikov
Prince Henry of Prussia Prince Henry of Prussia (1900-1904).JPG
Prince Henry of Prussia

March

Prince George, Duke of Cambridge George 2nd Cambridge.png
Prince George, Duke of Cambridge

April

Queen Isabella II of Spain Isabel de Borbon y Borbon-Dos Sicilias.jpg
Queen Isabella II of Spain
King Norodom of Cambodia King Norodom.jpg
King Norodom of Cambodia

May

Antonin Dvorak Dvorak.jpg
Antonín Dvořák
Manuel Candamo Manuel Candamo.jpg
Manuel Candamo
George Johnston Allman George Johnston Allman.jpg
George Johnston Allman
Henry Morton Stanley Henry M Stanley 1872.jpg
Henry Morton Stanley
Fyodor Bredikhin Fyodor Bredikhin 1890s.jpg
Fyodor Bredikhin
Francois Coillard Francois Coillard01.jpg
François Coillard
Duke Paul Frederick of Mecklenburg Paul Frederick of Mecklenburg.jpg
Duke Paul Frederick of Mecklenburg

June

July

Theodor Herzl Theodor Herzl.jpg
Theodor Herzl
Joseph Blanc Joseph-Paul Blanc photo.jpg
Joseph Blanc
Edouard Thilges Edouard Thilges.jpg
Édouard Thilges
Paul Kruger KrugerPaulusJohannes.jpg
Paul Kruger

August

Pierre Waldeck-Rousseau Pierre Waldeck-Rousseau by Nadar.jpg
Pierre Waldeck-Rousseau
Gaudensi Allar Gaudensi Allar.jpg
Gaudensi Allar
Sultan Murad V Portrait of Murad V.jpg
Sultan Murad V

September

Saint Jose Maria de Yermo y Parres San Jose de Yermo y los hermanos Tritschler.JPG
Saint José Maria de Yermo y Parres
Ernest, Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld Lippe-Biesterfeld, Ernst von.jpg
Ernest, Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld

October

George, King of Saxony George of Saxony by Nicola Perscheid c1900.jpg
George, King of Saxony
Maurice Baldwin Maurice Scollard Baldwin.jpg
Maurice Baldwin

November

Blessed Mary of the Passion Mariadelapasion2.jpg
Blessed Mary of the Passion

December

Johanna Anderson JohannaAnderson1905.tif
Johanna Anderson
Prince Frederick of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen Frederic de Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen.jpg
Prince Frederick of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
Mahmoud Samy El Baroudy Mahmoud Sami Al Baroudy Pasha.jpg
Mahmoud Samy El Baroudy

Date Unknown

Nobel Prizes

Nobel medal.png

Related Research Articles

1952 Year

1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1952nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 952nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1950s decade.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1931st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 931st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1930s decade.

1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1948th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 948th year of the 2nd millennium, the 48th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1940s decade.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1946th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 946th year of the 2nd millennium, the 46th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1940s decade.

1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1905th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 905th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1905, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1903rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 903rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1903, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1907th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 907th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1907, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1906th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 906th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1906, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1956th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 956th year of the 2nd millennium, the 56th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1950s decade.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1932nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 932nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 32nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1930s decade.

1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1955th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 955th year of the 2nd millennium, the 55th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1950s decade.

1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1925th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 925th year of the 2nd millennium, the 25th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1920s decade.

1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1930th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 930th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1930s decade.

1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1927th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 927th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1920s decade.

1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1934th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 934th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1930s decade.

1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1909th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 909th year of the 2nd millennium, the 9th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1909, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1914th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 914th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1914, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. This year saw the beginning of what became known as World War I, after Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir to the Austrian throne was assassinated by Serbian nationalist Gavrillo Princip. It also saw the first airline to provide scheduled regular commercial passenger services with heavier-than-air aircraft, with the St. Petersburg–Tampa Airboat Line.

References

  1. Grant, Neil (1993). Chronicle of 20th Century Conflict. New York City: Reed International Books Ltd. & Smithmark Publishers Inc. pp. 18–19. ISBN   0-8317-1371-2.
  2. Alpers, A. F. G. (1966). "Pelorus Jack". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Retrieved December 29, 2006.
  3. "IFK - 1904-1908". www.ifkgoteborg.se (in Swedish). Archived from the original on April 1, 2014. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  4. Headland, R. K. (1984). The Island of South Georgia. Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-25274-1.

Further reading