1904 Penn Quakers football team

Last updated
1904 Penn Quakers football
Pennsylvania football 1904.jpg
Penn in action
National champion (Helms, Houlgate, Davis)
Co-national champion (NCF)
ConferenceIndependent
1904 record12–0
Head coach
Captain Robert Torrey
Home stadium Franklin Field
Seasons
  1903
1905  
1904 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Penn     1200
Western U. of Penn.     1000
Dartmouth     701
Yale     1010
Amherst     910
Colgate     811
Carlisle     1020
Lafayette     820
Princeton     820
Army     720
Fordham     411
Harvard     721
Columbia     730
Cornell     730
Villanova     421
Syracuse     630
Penn State     640
Temple     320
Brown     650
Bucknell     330
NYU     360
Wesleyan     370
Geneva     142
New Hampshire     250
Rutgers     162
Tufts     291
Lehigh     180
Frankin & Marshall     0100

The 1904 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1904 college football season. The team finished with a 12–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and Parke H. Davis, and as a co-national champion by the National Championship Foundation. [1] They outscored their opponents 222 to 4. [2]

Schedule

DateOpponentSiteResultAttendanceSource
September 24 Penn State W 6–0
September 28 Swarthmore
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 6–4
October 1 Virginia
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 24–0
October 5 Franklin & Marshall
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 34–0
October 8 Lehigh
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 24–0
October 12 Gettysburg
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 21–0
October 15 Brown
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 6–0
October 22 Columbia
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 16–015,000 [3]
October 29at Harvard W 11–0
November 5 Lafayette
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 22–0
November 12 Carlisle
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA
W 18–0
November 24 Cornell
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia, PA (rivalry)
W 34–0

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The 1897 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1897 college football season. The team finished with a 15–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and National Championship Foundation, and as a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis. They outscored their opponents 463 to 20.

The 1908 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1908 college football season. The team finished with an 11–0–1 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and Parke H. Davis, and as a co-national champion by the National Championship Foundation. They outscored their opponents 215 to 28.

The 1924 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1924 college football season. The team was finished with a 9–1–1 record and was retroactively named as the 1924 national champion by Parke H. Davis. They outscored their opponents 203 to 31.

The 1900 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1900 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 12–1 record in their ninth year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, George Washington Woodruff. Significant games included victories over Penn State (17–5), Chicago (41–0), Carlisle (16–6), and Navy (28–6), and a loss to Harvard (17–5). The 1900 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 335 to 45. Four Penn players received recognition on the 1900 College Football All-America Team: guard Truxtun Hare ; tackle Blondy Wallace ; guard John Teas ; and fullback Josiah McCracken.

The 1896 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1896 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 14–1 record in their fifth year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, George Washington Woodruff. Significant games included victories over Navy (8–0), Carlisle (21–0), Penn State (27–0), Harvard (8–6), and Cornell (32–10), and its sole loss against undefeated national champion Lafayette (6–4). The 1896 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 326 to 24.

The 1892 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1892 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 15–1 record in their first year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, George Washington Woodruff. Significant games included victories over Penn State (20–0), Navy (16–0), Lafayette, and Princeton (6–4), and its sole loss to undefeated national champion Yale (28–0). The 1892 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 405 to 52. Penn halfback Harry Thayer was selected by both Walter Camp and Caspar Whitney as a first-team player on the 1892 College Football All-America Team.

The 1891 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1891 college football season. The Quakers finished with an 11–2 record in their fourth year under head coach E. O. Wagenhorst. Significant games included victories over Rutgers (32–6), Lafayette, and Lehigh, and losses to Princeton (24–0) and undefeated national champion Yale (48–0). The 1891 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 267 to 109. Penn center John Adams was selected by Caspar Whitney as a first-team player on the 1891 College Football All-America Team.

References

  1. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2015). "National Poll Rankings" (PDF). NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA. p. 108. Retrieved January 4, 2016.
  2. 1904 University of Pennsylvania football scores and results Archived October 9, 2013, at the Wayback Machine . College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on October 8, 2013.
  3. "Great Runs Won For Penn Over Columbia, 16-0". The Philadelphia Inquirer. October 23, 1904. pp. 1, 14 via Newspapers.com.