1906

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1906 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1906
MCMVI
Ab urbe condita 2659
Armenian calendar 1355
ԹՎ ՌՅԾԵ
Assyrian calendar 6656
Bahá'í calendar 62–63
Balinese saka calendar 1827–1828
Bengali calendar 1313
Berber calendar 2856
British Regnal year 5  Edw. 7   6  Edw. 7
Buddhist calendar 2450
Burmese calendar 1268
Byzantine calendar 7414–7415
Chinese calendar 乙巳(Wood  Snake)
4602 or 4542
     to 
丙午年 (Fire  Horse)
4603 or 4543
Coptic calendar 1622–1623
Discordian calendar 3072
Ethiopian calendar 1898–1899
Hebrew calendar 5666–5667
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1962–1963
 - Shaka Samvat 1827–1828
 - Kali Yuga 5006–5007
Holocene calendar 11906
Igbo calendar 906–907
Iranian calendar 1284–1285
Islamic calendar 1323–1324
Japanese calendar Meiji 39
(明治39年)
Javanese calendar 1835–1836
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar 4239
Minguo calendar 6 before ROC
民前6年
Nanakshahi calendar 438
Thai solar calendar 2448–2449
Tibetan calendar 阴木蛇年
(female Wood-Snake)
2032 or 1651 or 879
     to 
阳火马年
(male Fire-Horse)
2033 or 1652 or 880

1906 ( MCMVI ) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar , the 1906th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 906th year of the 2nd millennium , the 6th year of the 20th century , and the 7th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1906, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013, 2019, and 2030 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

Contents

Events

January–February

January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 353 days remain until the end of the year.

Persian Constitutional Revolution

The Persian Constitutional Revolution, also known as the Constitutional Revolution of Iran, took place between 1905 and 1911. The revolution led to the establishment of a parliament in Persia (Iran) during the Qajar dynasty.

Shah Persian title

Shah is a title given to the emperors, kings, princes and lords of Iran. It was also adopted by the kings of Shirvan namely the Shirvanshahs. It was also used by Persianate societies such as the rulers and offspring of the Ottoman Empire, Mughal emperors of the Indian Subcontinent, the Bengal Sultanate, as well as in Afghanistan. In Iran the title was continuously used; rather than King in the European sense, each Persian ruler regarded himself as the Shahanshah or Padishah of the Persian Empire.

January 31: Ecuador earthquake (8.6). EcuadorLocation.png
January 31: Ecuador earthquake (8.6).

March–April

March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 302 days remain until the end of the year.

Indian Territory U.S. 17th-, 18th- and early-20th-century territory set aside by the United States Government for the relocation of the indigenous peoples of the Americas

As general terms, Indian Territory, the Indian Territories, or Indian country describe an evolving land area set aside by the United States Government for the relocation of Native Americans who held aboriginal title to their land. In general, the tribes ceded land they occupied in exchange for land grants in 1803. The concept of an Indian Territory was an outcome of the 18th- and 19th-century policy of Indian removal. After the Civil War (1861–1865), the policy of the government was one of assimilation.

Oklahoma U.S. state in the United States

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south and west, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

The ruins of San Francisco following the April 18 earthquake and later fires San francisco 1906 earthquake.jpg
The ruins of San Francisco following the April 18 earthquake and later fires

May–June

May fifth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

May is the fifth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the third of seven months to have a length of 31 days.

Jack London American author, journalist, and social activist

John Griffith London was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first writers to become a worldwide celebrity and earn a large fortune from writing. He was also an innovator in the genre that would later become known as science fiction.

<i>White Fang</i> novel by Jack London

White Fang is a novel by American author Jack London (1876–1916) — and the name of the book's eponymous character, a wild wolfdog. First serialized in Outing magazine, it was published in 1906. The story details White Fang's journey to domestication in Yukon Territory and the Northwest Territories during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush. It is a companion novel to London's best-known work, The Call of the Wild, which is about a kidnapped, domesticated dog embracing his wild ancestry to survive and thrive in the wild.

July–August

September–October

November–December

Date unknown

Births

January–February

John Carradine John Carradine in Blood and Sand trailer.jpg
John Carradine
Clyde Tombaugh Clyde W. Tombaugh.jpeg
Clyde Tombaugh
Puyi, Last Emperor of China Aisin-Gioro Puyi 01.jpg
Puyi, Last Emperor of China
Nazim al-Kudsi Nazim al=Kudsi.jpg
Nazim al-Kudsi

March–April

Shin'ichiro Tomonaga Tomonaga.jpg
Shin'ichirō Tomonaga
Bea Benaderet Bea Benadaret 1966.JPG
Bea Benaderet
Samuel Beckett Samuel Beckett, Pic, 1.jpg
Samuel Beckett
Tony Accardo Tony Accardo 1960.jpg
Tony Accardo

May–June

Mary Astor Mary Astor-1930s.JPG
Mary Astor
Roberto Rossellini Rossellini+gatta.jpg
Roberto Rossellini
Josephine Baker Baker Banana.jpg
Josephine Baker
Ernst Boris Chain Ernst Boris Chain 1945.jpg
Ernst Boris Chain
Maria Goeppert-Mayer Maria Goeppert-Mayer.jpg
Maria Goeppert-Mayer

July–August

Alberto Lleras Camargo Alberto Lleras Camargo.jpg
Alberto Lleras Camargo
Vladimir Prelog Vladimir Prelog ETH-Bib Portr 00214.jpg
Vladimir Prelog
John Huston John Huston - publicity.JPG
John Huston
John Betjeman Sir John Betjeman (1906-1984).jpg
John Betjeman
Joaquin Balaguer Joaquin Balaguer.jpg
Joaquín Balaguer

September

Max Delbruck Max Delbruck.jpg
Max Delbrück
Jose Figueres Ferrer Jose Figueres Ferrer 1.png
José Figueres Ferrer

October

Janet Gaynor Janet Gaynor-publicity.JPG
Janet Gaynor
Leopold Sedar Senghor Leopold Sedar Senghor.jpg
Léopold Sédar Senghor

November–December

Luchino Visconti Luchino Visconti 1972.jpg
Luchino Visconti
Empress Wanrong Empress Gobele Wan-Rong (03).JPG
Empress Wanrong

Deaths

January–June

Bartolome Mitre BartolomeMitre.jpg
Bartolome Mitre
Pierre Curie Pierre Curie by Dujardin c1906.jpg
Pierre Curie
King Christian IX of Denmark Christian IX af Henrik Olrik.jpg
King Christian IX of Denmark
Manuel Quintana Manuel A Quintana.jpg
Manuel Quintana

July–December

Carlos Pellegrini Retrato de Carlos Pellegrini.jpg
Carlos Pellegrini
Aniceto Arce Aniceto Arce.jpg
Aniceto Arce
Ezequiel Moreno y Diaz Sanezequiel02.jpg
Ezequiél Moreno y Díaz
Paul Cezanne Paul cezanne 1861.jpg
Paul Cézanne
Otto Franz of Austria ArchdukeOttoof Austria.jpg
Otto Franz of Austria
Todor Burmov Todor Burmov.jpg
Todor Burmov

Nobel Prizes

Nobel medal.png

Related Research Articles

1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1918th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 918th year of the 2nd millennium, the 18th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1918, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1908 Year

1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1911 Year

1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1911th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 911th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1911, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1931st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 931st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1930s decade.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1901st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 901st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1901, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1903rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 903rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1903, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1907th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 907th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1907, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1902nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 902nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1902, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1936th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 936th year of the 2nd millennium, the 36th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1930s decade.

1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1895th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 895th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1890s decade. As of the start of 1895, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1910th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 910th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1910, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1888th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 888th year of the 2nd millennium, the 88th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1888, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Germany, 1888 is known as the Year of the Three Emperors. Currently, it is the year that, when written in Roman numerals, has the most digits (13). The next year that also has 13 digits is the year 2388. The record will be surpassed as late as 2888, which has 14 digits.

1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1881st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 881st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1881, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1930th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 930th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1930s decade.

1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1934th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 934th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1930s decade.

References

  1. Stuart, J. (1913). History of the Zulu Rebellion 1906. London: Macmillan and Co. pp. 548–581.
  2. https://www.sporting.pt/en/club/history/founding-members - Founding Members | Official website of Sporting Clube De Portugal - Accessed on 4-1-2019
  3. "Hongkong Typhoon". Auckland Star . 37 (244). New Zealand. October 19, 1906. p. 5. Retrieved December 30, 2017. Over 1,000 bodies are recovered, but cabled statements are verified that the number of lives lost totalled about 10,000. Retrieved via Papers Past .
  4. "About the club - Maccabi Tel Aviv Football Club". Maccabi Tel Aviv Football Club. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  5. "Pedro Vargas", Last.fm (in Spanish), retrieved August 24, 2019

Sources

Further reading