1911 Cincinnati Reds season

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1911 Cincinnati Reds
Major League affiliations
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Owner(s) Garry Herrmann
Manager(s) Clark Griffith
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The 1911 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 70–83, 29 games behind the New York Giants.

Cincinnati Reds Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

The Cincinnati Reds are an American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. They were a charter member of the American Association in 1882 and joined the NL in 1890.

Baseball Sport

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

National League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, known simply as the National League (NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest current professional team sports league. Founded on February 2, 1876, to replace the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (NAPBBP) of 1871–1875,, the NL is sometimes called the Senior Circuit, in contrast to MLB's other league, the American League, which was founded 25 years later.

Contents

Offseason

The Reds were involved in an eight player trade with the Philadelphia Phillies on November 12, as Cincinnati traded away pitchers Fred Beebe and Jack Rowan, third baseman Hans Lobert, and outfielder Dode Paskert to Philadelphia, and received outfielder Johnny Bates, third baseman Eddie Grant, and pitchers George McQuillan and Lew Moren.

Philadelphia Phillies Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

The Philadelphia Phillies are an American professional baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Phillies compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park, located in South Philadelphia.

Fred Beebe American baseball player

Frederick Leonard Beebe was a professional baseball player. He played for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians.

Jack Rowan (baseball) American baseball player

John Albert Rowan was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched all or part of seven seasons in the majors, between 1906 and 1914, for four different teams. When he wasn't pitching in the majors, Rowan played for the Dayton Veterans of the Central League in 1908 and from 1912 until 1917.

Bates batted .305 with three home runs and 61 RBI in 135 games for the Phillies in 1910, while Grant hit .268 with one home run and 67 RBI in 152 games. Grant led the National League in at bats in both 1908 and 1909. McQullan missed some time in 1910 due to injuries, however, he had a 9-6 record with a 1.60 ERA in 24 games. In 1908, McQuillan posted a 23-17 record with a 1.53 ERA in 48 games, pitching 359.2 innings, and throwing 32 complete games. Moren was 13-14 with a 3.55 ERA in 34 games with the Phillies in 1910.

On February 6, the Reds purchased outfielder Fred Beck from the Boston Rustlers. Beck hit .275 with a league leading 10 home runs and had 64 RBI in 154 games in 1910.

Fred Beck American baseball player

Frederick Thomas Beck was a baseball player in the major leagues from 1909 to 1911 with the Boston Doves, Cincinnati Reds, and Philadelphia Phillies. In 1914 and 1915, he played for the Chicago Whales of the Federal League. In one season (1910), Beck tied two other players for the league lead in home runs. Beck played minor-league baseball for many years, missing one season due to service in World War I. He retired from professional baseball after the 1926 season.

Regular season

The Reds continued to make moves in the regular season, acquiring Frank Smith from the Boston Red Sox for $5000 on May 11. Smith, who split the 1910 season with the Red Sox and the Chicago White Sox and dealt with injuries, had a poor start with Boston in 1911. He had a great 1909 season with the White Sox, going 25-17 with a 1.80 ERA, and led the American League with 51 games pitched, 40 starts, 37 complete games, 365 innings pitched and struck out 177 batters.

Boston Red Sox Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Boston, Massachusetts, United States

The Boston Red Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. The Red Sox have won nine World Series championships, tied for the third-most of any MLB team, and they have played in 13. Their most recent appearance and win was in 2018. In addition, they won the 1904 American League pennant, but were not able to defend their 1903 World Series championship when the New York Giants refused to participate in the 1904 World Series. Founded in 1901 as one of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Red Sox' home ballpark has been Fenway Park since 1912. The "Red Sox" name was chosen by the team owner, John I. Taylor, circa 1908, following the lead of previous teams that had been known as the "Boston Red Stockings", including the forerunner of the Atlanta Braves.

Chicago White Sox Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Chicago, Illinois, United States

The Chicago White Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division. The White Sox are owned by Jerry Reinsdorf, and play their home games at Guaranteed Rate Field, located on the city's South Side. They are one of two major league clubs in Chicago; the other is the Chicago Cubs, who are a member of the National League (NL) Central division.

Midway through the season, in June, the Reds purchased outfielder Armando Marsans from New Britain Perfectos of the Connecticut State League for $6000. Shortly after, on July 9, Cincinnati traded away outfielder Fred Beck to the Philadelphia Phillies for pitcher Bert Humphries. Beck struggled in his time with Cincinnati, batting only .184 with two home runs and 20 RBI in 41 games.

Armando Marsans baseball player; first Cuban major league baseball player

Armando Marsans was a Major League Baseball outfielder from 1911 to 1918. He played in three different major leagues in his career: with the Cincinnati Reds in the National League, with the St. Louis Terriers in the Federal League, and with the St. Louis Browns and New York Yankees.

Bert Humphries American baseball player

Albert Humphries, was a professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1910-1915. He would play for the Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs, and Philadelphia Phillies.

Offensively, the club was led by first baseman Dick Hoblitzell, who hit .289 with 11 home runs and 91 RBI in 158 games. Outfielder Bob Bescher led the National League with 81 stolen bases, and hit .275 with one home run, 45 RBI, had 102 walks, and scored a team high 106 runs. Newly acquired Johnny Bates hit a team high .292 with one home run, 61 RBI, 33 stolen bases in his first season with the club. Mike Mitchell had another solid season, batting .291 with two home runs and 84 RBI.

Dick Hoblitzell American baseball player

Richard Carleton "Dick" Hoblitzell played first base in the major leagues from 1908 to 1918. He played for the Cincinnati Reds and Boston Red Sox. Nicknamed "Doc" by his teammates, Hoblitzell's baseball career was cut short with his World War I induction into the US Army as a dentist in 1918.

Bob Bescher American baseball player

Robert Henry "Bob" Bescher was a baseball outfielder who played 11 seasons in the major leagues. Born in London, Ohio, he played his best seasons with the Cincinnati Reds, and was one of the National League's best base stealers during his time.

Johnny Bates (baseball) American baseball player

John William Bates was a Major League Baseball outfielder. He played nine seasons in the majors from 1906 until 1914. Bates played for the Boston Beaneaters, Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs in the National League, and finished his career with the Baltimore Terrapins of the Federal League.

George Suggs led the pitching staff, as he had a 15-13 record and a 3.00 ERA in 36 games, leading Cincinnati with 260.2 innings pitched and 17 complete games. Art Fromme had a 10-12 record with a 3.46 ERA, and led the Reds by striking out 107 batters.

Season Summary

After making some trades over the off-season, the Reds entered the 1911 season with a goal of winning the National League pennant. The club began the season with a poor 3-6 record in their first nine games, before winning eight of their next ten, to improve to 11-8, however, Cincinnati was in fourth place, five games behind the first place Philadelphia Phillies. With a four-game series against the Phillies, the Reds ended up losing three of the game, including a 21-5 blowout loss, to drop further behind them in the race for the pennant.

The Reds continued to struggle, and were 10 games under .500 in early July. The team limped their way through the 1911 season, finishing with a 70-83 record, and in sixth place in the National League, 29 games behind the New York Giants. It was the worst season by Cincinnati since a 66-87 record in 1907.

At the end of the season, the Reds replaced manager Clark Griffith.

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Giants 99540.64749–2550–29
Chicago Cubs 92620.59749–3243–30
Pittsburgh Pirates 85690.55214½48–2937–40
Philadelphia Phillies 79730.52019½42–3437–39
St. Louis Cardinals 75740.5032236–3839–36
Cincinnati Reds 70830.4582938–4232–41
Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers 64860.42733½31–4233–44
Boston Rustlers 441070.2915419–5425–53

Record vs. opponents

1911 National League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSBRCHCCINNYGPHIPITSTL
Boston 12–10–15–174–17–17–156–163–197–13–3
Brooklyn 10–12–113–911–115–16–18–13–114–89–11–1
Chicago 17–59–1314–8–111–1115–710–1216–6–2
Cincinnati 17–4–111–118–14–18–1410–1210–12–16–16–3
New York 15–716–5–111–1114–812–1016–615–7
Philadelphia 16–613–8–17–1512–1010–1213–98–13
Pittsburgh 19–314–812–1012–10–16–169–1313–9
St. Louis 13–7–311–9–16–16–216–6–37–1513–89–13

Roster

1911 Cincinnati Reds
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
2B Dick Egan 153558139.249156
OF Johnny Bates 148518151.292161

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Rube Benton 644.2332.0128

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Ray Boyd 744222.6620
Bill Burns 617.2103.065

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGWLSVERASO

Notes

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    References