1915 Cincinnati Reds season

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1915 Cincinnati Reds
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Owner(s) Garry Herrmann
Manager(s) Buck Herzog
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The 1915 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 71–83, 20 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

Cincinnati Reds Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

The Cincinnati Reds are an American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. They were a charter member of the American Association in 1882 and joined the NL in 1890.

National League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, known simply as the National League (NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest current professional team sports league. Founded on February 2, 1876, to replace the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (NAPBBP) of 1871–1875, the NL is sometimes called the Senior Circuit, in contrast to MLB's other league, the American League, which was founded 25 years later.

The 1915 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Phillies winning the National League, then going on to lose the 1915 World Series to the Boston Red Sox. This was the team's first pennant since joining the league in 1883. They would have to wait another 35 years for their second.

Contents

Off-season

On December 14, the Reds picked up infielder Ivy Olson off of waivers from the Cleveland Naps. Olson struggled in the 1914 season, batting .242 with one home run and 20 RBI in 89 games with the Naps.

Ivy Olson American baseball player

Ivan Massie "Ivy" Olson was an American professional baseball shortstop. He played fourteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1911 to 1924 for the Cleveland Naps, Cincinnati Reds, and Brooklyn Robins.

In early 1915, the Reds lost infielder Marty Berghammer, who jumped to the Pittsburgh Rebels of the Federal League. Berghammer saw limited action with the club, batting .223 with six RBI in 77 games during the 1914 season.

Marty Berghammer American baseball player

Martin Andrew Berghammer was a Major League Baseball shortstop who played for four seasons. He played for the Chicago White Sox in 1911 and the Cincinnati Reds from 1913 to 1914. He also played for the Pittsburgh Rebels of the Federal League in 1915.

The Pittsburgh Rebels were a Major League Baseball club based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1914 and 1915. The team was a member of the short-lived Federal League.They finished the 1914 season as the Pittsburgh Rebels. The team was originally called Pittsburgh Stogies after an earlier Pittsburgh team that played in the Union Association in 1884. They finished the year as the Pittsburgh Rebels. The team played all of its home games at Exposition Park, located on Pittsburgh's Northside. The Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League left the stadium for Forbes Field in 1909. After the Rebels left Exposition Park in 1915, the field was demolished and its property became part of the rail yards.

Federal League American professional baseball league

The Federal League of Base Ball Clubs, known simply as the Federal League, was an American professional baseball league that played its first season in 1913 and operated as a "third major league", in competition with the established National and American Leagues, from 1914 to 1915.

The club purchased pitcher Gene Dale from the Montreal Royals of the International League. Dale had a 10-17 record with a 4.94 ERA with the Royals in the 1914 season, pitching 253.1 innings pitched in 36 games. Dale had previous major league experience, going 0-7 with a 6.60 ERA in 24 games over two seasons in 1911 and 1912 with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Gene Dale American baseball player

Emmett Eugene Dale, sometimes referred to as Jean Dale, was an American professional baseball player. Dale was a pitcher, and played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the St. Louis Cardinals (1911–1912) and Cincinnati Reds (1915–1916). He also played in minor league baseball. He was expelled from organized baseball in 1921 for match fixing.

The Montreal Royals were a minor league professional baseball team in Montreal, Quebec, from 1897–1917 and 1928–60. A member of the International League, the Royals were the top farm club of the Brooklyn Dodgers from 1939; pioneering African-American player Jackie Robinson was a member for the 1946 season. The 1946 Royals were recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.

International League Minor League Baseball league of AAA teams operating in the eastern United States

The International League (IL) is a Minor League Baseball league that operates in the eastern United States and is headquartered in Dublin, Ohio. Like the Pacific Coast League and the Mexican League, it plays at the Triple-A level, which is one step below Major League Baseball.

On February 11, Cincinnati traded third baseman Bert Niehoff to the Philadelphia Phillies in exchange for catcher Red Dooin. Dooin struggled for the Phillies in 1914, batting only .178 with one home run and eight RBI in 53 games. To replace Niehoff at third base, the Reds moved second baseman Heinie Groh to third, and newly acquired Ivy Olson and Joe Wagner, who the team acquired in late December from the Spokane Indians of the Northwestern League, would split time playing second base.

Bert Niehoff American baseball player and coach

John Albert Niehoff was a second baseman in Major League Baseball who played for four different clubs between the 1913 and 1918 seasons. He batted and threw right-handed.

Philadelphia Phillies Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

The Philadelphia Phillies are a professional baseball team based in Philadelphia, USA. The Phillies compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the National League (NL) East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park, located in South Philadelphia. The Phillies are the oldest, continuous, one-name, one-city franchise in American professional sports.

Red Dooin American baseball player

Charles Sebastian "Red" Dooin was an American professional baseball player and manager. A catcher in Major League Baseball during the first two decades of the 20th century, he played 1,219 of his 1,290 games as a member of the Philadelphia Phillies and managed the Phils from 1910 through 1914.

The Reds signed free agent outfielder Tommy Leach to a contract on February 22. Leach, who began his major league career with the Louisville Colonels in 1898, appeared in 153 games with the Chicago Cubs in 1914, batting .263 with seven home runs and 46 RBI. Leach had led the National League with 22 triples and six home runs while playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1902, led the NL with 126 runs with the Pirates in 1909, and led the NL again in runs in 1913 with the Cubs with 99.

Tommy Leach American baseball player

Thomas Andrew Leach was a professional baseball outfielder and third baseman. He played in Major League Baseball from 1898 through 1918 for the Louisville Colonels, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds.

Louisville Colonels former american Major League Baseball team

The Louisville Colonels were a Major League Baseball team that played in the American Association (AA) throughout that league's ten-year existence from 1882 until 1891. They were known as the Louisville Eclipse from 1882 to 1884, and as the Louisville Colonels from 1885 to 1891. The latter name derived from the historic Kentucky colonels. After the AA folded in 1891, the Colonels joined the National League and played through the 1899 season. Until the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington in 2004, Louisville was the last city to lose a Major League Baseball franchise and not have another franchise eventually replace it.

Chicago Cubs Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Chicago, Illinois, United States

The Chicago Cubs are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. The team plays its home games at Wrigley Field, located on the city's North Side. The Cubs are one of two major league teams in Chicago; the other, the Chicago White Sox, is a member of the American League (AL) Central division. The Cubs, first known as the White Stockings, were a founding member of the NL in 1876, becoming the Chicago Cubs in 1903.

On the same date, February 22, Cincinnati selected pitcher Fred Toney off of waivers from the Brooklyn Robins. He played the 1914 season with the Louisville Colonels of the American Association, going 21-15 with a 3.21 ERA, pitching 311 innings in 49 games. Toney pitched with the Chicago Cubs from 1911-1913, goin 4-5 with a 4.02 ERA in 34 games in those three seasons.

Regular season

On April 8, before the regular season began, the Reds traded away catcher Mike Gonzalez to the St. Louis Cardinals for catcher Ivey Wingo. Wingo batted .300 with four home runs and 26 RBI in 80 games with the Cardinals the previous season.

Midway through the season, on July 8, the Reds purchased second baseman Bill Rodgers from the Boston Red Sox. Rodgers had already split the season between the Cleveland Indians and the Red Sox, batting .275 with seven RBI in 27 games, before being acquired by Cincinnati. He became the starting second baseman, as nine days later, the Reds placed Ivy Olson on waivers, and he was picked up by the Brooklyn Robins.

On July 23, the club sold pitcher Red Ames to the St. Louis Cardinals. Ames, who led the Reds pitching staff in 1914 with 297 innings pitched and 47 games pitched, while having a record of 15-21, struggled badly with the team at the time he was sold. In 17 games, Ames was 2-4 with a 4.50 ERA in 68 innings. He made only seven starts.

The club continued to make moves with the pitching staff, as Rube Benton was sold to the New York Giants for $3000 on August 19. Benton had a 6-13 record with a 3.32 ERA in 35 games.

Offensively, the team was second in the National League with a .253 batting average, and led the league in hits. Tommy Griffith led the Reds with a .307 batting average, four home runs and 85 RBI in his first season with the team. Heinie Groh had a solid season in his first year as a third baseman, batting .290 with three home runs and 50 RBI in 160 games. Player-manager Buck Herzog hit .264 with one home run, 42 RBI and a team high 35 stolen bases in 154 games.

The pitching staff was led by Gene Dale, who led the Reds with a record of 18-17, a 2.46 ERA and pitched in a team high 49 games, making 35 starts, throwing 20 complete games, and pitched 296.2 innings. Fred Toney had a record of 17-6 with a team best 1.58 ERA in 36 games, while 19 year old Pete Schneider had a 14-19 record with a 2.48 ERA in 48 games.

Season summary

The rebuilding Reds had a very solid 8-3 record in their first eleven games, however, a 3-13 stretch in their next 16 games knocked them into last place in the National League. The club would stay below .500 for the rest of the season, batting the New York Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs for fourth in the National League. Eventually, the Reds finished in seventh place with a record of 71-83, 20 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies for the National League Pennant. Their 71 wins was an improvement of 11 over the 1914 season, and attendance more than doubled in 1915, as Cincinnati drew 218,878 fans, however, it was still the lowest in the league.

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Phillies 90620.59249–2741–35
Boston Braves 83690.546749–2734–42
Brooklyn Robins 80720.5261051–2629–46
Chicago Cubs 73800.47717½42–3431–46
Pittsburgh Pirates 73810.4741840–3733–44
St. Louis Cardinals 72810.47118½42–3630–45
Cincinnati Reds 71830.4612039–3732–46
New York Giants 69830.4542137–3832–45

Record vs. opponents

1915 National League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSBRCHCCINNYGPHIPITSTL
Boston 14–8–110–12–115–713–9–17–1415–79–12–2
Brooklyn 8–14–114–811–11–112–813–911–1111–11
Chicago 12–10–18–1413–9–28–147–1413–912–10
Cincinnati 7–1511–11–19–13–29–13–19–1312–10–114–8–1
New York 9–13–18–1214–813–9–17–15–18–1410–12
Philadelphia 14–79–1314–713–915–7–110–1215–7
Pittsburgh 7–1511–119–1310–12–114–812–1010–12–1
St. Louis 12–9–211–1110–128–14–112–107–1512–10–1

Roster

1915 Cincinnati Reds
Roster
Pitchers
  • [Phil Douglas (baseball)
Catchers

Infielders

OutfieldersManager

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
SS Buck Herzog 155579153.264142

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
Ken Williams 7121953.242016

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Red Ames 1768244.5026

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGWLSVERASO

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