1920–21 British Home Championship

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1920–1921 British Home Championship
Tournament details
Host countryEngland, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales
Dates23 October 1920 –11 April 1921
Teams4
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland (11th title)
Runners-upShared: Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales /Flag of England.svg  England
Tournament statistics
Matches played6
Goals scored13 (2.17 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Scotland.svg Andrew Wilson (4 goals)

The 1920–21 British Home Championship was a football tournament played between the British Home Nations during the 1920–21 season. The second tournament played since the hiatus of the First World War, the 1921 competition was dominated by Scotland, who won the first of seven championships they would claim throughout the decade. England and reigning champions Wales came joint second as goal difference was not at this stage used to separate teams.

Contents

England and Ireland kicked off the competition in October 1920, with England gaining an early advantage through a 2–0 victory. Action resumed the following February when Scotland beat current champions Wales at home and then Ireland away, to top the table. Wales and England both needed victory in their match to have a chance of catching Scotland, but both sides nullified each other and the result was a scoreless draw, requiring an English victory over the Scots in their final game to beat Scotland's lead. In the final games played simultaneously on 9 April, Wales beat Ireland to elevate themselves into joint second place as England crashed 3–0 to a superior Scottish side in Glasgow, thus making Scotland British Champions.

Table

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland (C)330071+66
Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 31113303
Flag of England.svg  England 31112313
Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 30031650
Source: [1]
Rules for classification: 1) points. The points system worked as follows: 2 points for a win and 1 point for a draw.
(C) Champion.

Results

England  Flag of England.svg2–0Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland
Soccerball shade.svg 8' Bob Kelly
Soccerball shade.svg 47' Billy Walker
 
Roker Park, Sunderland
Attendance: 22,000
Referee: Alex Jackson (Scotland)

Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg2–1Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales
Andrew Wilson Soccerball shade.svg 11', 46'Soccerball shade.svg 30' Dai Collier
Pittodrie, Aberdeen
Attendance: 20,824
Referee: James Mason (England)

Ireland  Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg0–2Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
 Soccerball shade.svg 10' (Pen.) Andrew Wilson
Soccerball shade.svg 87' Joe Cassidy
Windsor Park, Belfast
Attendance: 40,000
Referee: Arthur Ward (England)

Wales  Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg0–0Flag of England.svg  England
  
Ninian Park, Cardiff
Attendance: 12,000
Referee: Alex Jackson (Scotland)

Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg3–0Flag of England.svg  England
Andrew Wilson Soccerball shade.svg 20'
Alan Morton Soccerball shade.svg 43'
Andy Cunningham Soccerball shade.svg 53'
 
Hampden Park, Glasgow
Attendance: 85,000
Referee: Arthur Ward (England)

Wales  Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg2–1Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland
Soccerball shade.svg 35' Billy Hole
Soccerball shade.svg Stan Davies
Soccerball shade.svg 60' Jimmy Chambers
Vetch Field, Swansea
Attendance: 20,000
Referee: Jack Howcraft (England)

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "British Home Championship 1920-1921". EU-Football. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  2. Thistle V The Leek, video footage from official Pathé News archive
  3. Hampden Park Defeats England In Football Match, video footage from official Pathé News archive