1925 Australian federal election

Last updated

1925 Australian federal election
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
  1922 14 November 1925 (1925-11-14) 1928  

All 75 seats in the House of Representatives
38 seats were needed for a majority in the House
22 (of the 36) seats in the Senate
 First partySecond party
  Stanley Bruce 1926.jpg Matthew Charlton 1925.jpg
Leader Stanley Bruce Matthew Charlton
Party Nationalist/Country coalition Labor
Leader since9 February 1923 16 May 1922
Leader's seat Flinders (Vic.) Hunter (NSW)
Last election40 seats29 seats
Seats won51 seats23 seats
Seat changeIncrease2.svg11Decrease2.svg6
Percentage53.80%46.20%
SwingIncrease2.svg2.60%Decrease2.svg2.60%

Australia 1925 federal election.png
Popular vote by state with graphs indicating the number of seats won. As this is an IRV election, seat totals are not determined by popular vote by state but instead via results in each electorate.

Prime Minister before election

Stanley Bruce
Nationalist/Country coalition

Subsequent Prime Minister

Stanley Bruce
Nationalist/Country coalition

The 1925 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 14 November 1925. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 22 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist–Country coalition, led by Prime Minister Stanley Bruce, defeated the opposition Labor Party led by Matthew Charlton in a landslide. This was the first time any party had won a fourth consecutive federal election.

Contents

Compulsory voting for federal elections was introduced in 1924 and first used in the 1925 elections, where 91.4% of the electorate cast a vote, compared to 59.4% at the 1922 elections.

Campaign

Prime Minister Stanley Bruce was a supporter of the White Australia Policy, and made it an issue in his campaign for the 1925 Australian Federal election. [1]

It is necessary that we should determine what are the ideals towards which every Australian would desire to strive. I think those ideals might well be stated as being to secure our national safety, and to ensure the maintenance of our White Australia Policy to continue as an integral portion of the British Empire. [1] We intend to keep this country white and not allow its people to be faced with the problems that at present are practically insoluble in many parts of the world. [2]

Results

Labor: 23 seats
Nationalist: 37 seats
Country : 13 seats
Independent: 2 seats Australian House of Representatives, 1925.svg
  Labor: 23 seats
  Nationalist: 37 seats
  Country : 13 seats
  Independent: 2 seats

House of Representatives

House of Reps (IRV) — 1925–28 — Turnout 91.39% (CV) — Informal 2.36%
PartyVotes%SwingSeatsChange
  Nationalist–Country coalition 1,551,76053.20N/A50N/A
  Nationalist  1,238,39742.46+7.2337+11
  Country  313,36310.74–1.8213–1
  Labor 1,313,62745.04+2.7423–6
  Independents 51,2511.76–2.802+1
 Total2,916,638  75
Two-party-preferred (estimated)
  Nationalist–Country coalition WIN53.80N/A51N/A
  Labor 46.20−2.6023–6

Notes
Popular Vote
Labor
45.04%
Nationalist
42.46%
Country
10.74%
Others
1.76%
Two Party Preferred Vote
Coalition
53.80%
Labor
46.20%
Parliament Seats
Coalition
68.00%
Labor
30.67%
Others
2.67%

Senate

Senate (P BV) — 1925–28 — Turnout 91.31% (CV) — Informal 6.96%
PartyVotes%SwingSeats WonSeats HeldChange
  Nationalist–Country coalition 1,537,28254.81N/A2228N/A
  Nationalist  1,272,12745.35+9.1218240
  Country  265,1559.45–3.5344+4
  Labor 1,262,91245.02–0.6708–4
  Independents 4,8080.17–1.87000
 Total2,805,002  2236

Seats changing hands

SeatPre-1925SwingPost-1925
PartyMemberMarginMarginMemberParty
Angas, SA  Labor Moses Gabb 8.08.30.3 Walter Parsons Nationalist 
Balaclava, Vic  Liberal William Watt 100.030.319.7 William Watt Nationalist 
Barker, SA  Liberal Malcolm Cameron 2.39.311.6 Malcolm Cameron Nationalist 
Barton, NSW  Labor Frederick McDonald 7.68.61.0 Thomas Ley Nationalist 
Boothby, SA  Liberal Jack Duncan-Hughes 4.72.97.6 Jack Duncan-Hughes Nationalist 
Darwin, Tas  Country Joshua Whitsitt 0.410.910.5* George Bell Nationalist 
Denison, Tas  Labor David O'Keefe 0.42.62.2 John Gellibrand Nationalist 
Gwydir, NSW  Labor Lou Cunningham 0.13.23.1 Aubrey Abbott Country 
Kennedy, Qld  Labor Charles McDonald N/A100.0100.0 Grosvenor Francis Nationalist 
Kooyong, Vic  Liberal John Latham 0.618.317.7 John Latham Nationalist 
Wakefield, SA  Liberal Richard Foster 5.39.514.8 Richard Foster Nationalist 
Wannon, Vic  Labor John McNeill 0.84.84.0 Arthur Rodgers Nationalist 
Wimmera, Vic  Country Percy Stewart 21.277.827.8 Percy Stewart Independent 

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 "ISSUES OF THE ELECTIONS". The Age (21, 999). Victoria, Australia. 6 October 1925. p. 11. Retrieved 9 December 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  2. Bowen, James; Bowen, Margarita (2002). The Great Barrier Reef: History, Science, Heritage. Cambridge University Press. p. 301. ISBN   0-521-82430-3 . Retrieved 24 January 2008.
  3. "Kennedy Seat". Brisbane Courier. 14 November 1925. p. 7. Retrieved 19 July 2010.

Related Research Articles

Nationalist Party (Australia) former Australian political party

The Nationalist Party was an Australian political party. It was formed on 17 February 1917 from a merger between the Commonwealth Liberal Party and the National Labor Party, the latter formed by Prime Minister Billy Hughes and his supporters after the 1916 Labor Party split over World War I conscription. The Nationalist Party was in government until electoral defeat in 1929. From that time it was the main opposition to the Labor Party until it merged with pro-Joseph Lyons Labor defectors to form the United Australia Party (UAP) in 1931. The party was a direct ancestor of the Liberal Party of Australia, the main centre-right party in Australia.

Parliament of Australia legislative branch of the Commonwealth of Australia

The Parliament of Australia is the legislative branch of the government of Australia. It consists of three elements: the Crown, the Senate and the House of Representatives. The combination of two elected chambers, in which the members of the Senate represent the states and territories while the members of the House represent electoral divisions according to population, is modelled on the United States Congress. Through both chambers, however, there is a fused executive, drawn from the Westminster system.

1998 Australian federal election

The 1998 Australian federal election was held to determine the members of the 39th Parliament of Australia. It was held on 3 October 1998. All 148 seats of the House of Representatives and 40 seats of the 76-seat Senate were up for election. The incumbent centre-right Liberal/National Coalition government led by Prime Minister John Howard of the Liberal Party and coalition partner Tim Fischer of the National Party defeated the centre-left Australian Labor Party opposition led by Opposition Leader Kim Beazley despite losing the two party preferred popular vote.

1996 Australian federal election election

The 1996 Australian federal election was held to determine the members of the 38th Parliament of Australia. It was held on 2 March 1996. All 148 seats of the House of Representatives and 40 seats of the 76-seat Senate were up for election. The centre-right Liberal/National Coalition led by Opposition Leader John Howard of the Liberal Party and coalition partner Tim Fischer of the National Party defeated in a landslide the incumbent centre-left Australian Labor Party government led by Prime Minister Paul Keating.

Coalition (Australia) group of centre-right parties in Australia

The Liberal–National Coalition, commonly known simply as The Coalition, is an alliance of centre-right political parties that forms one of the two major groupings in Australian federal politics. Its main opponent is the Australian Labor Party (ALP); the two forces are often regarded as operating in a two-party system. The Coalition has been in government since the 2013 federal election, most recently being re-elected in the 2019 Australian federal election. The group is led by Scott Morrison as Prime Minister of Australia since August 2018.

Politics of Australia Political system of Australia

The politics of Australia take place within the framework of a federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy. Australia has maintained a stable liberal democratic political system under its Constitution, one of the world's oldest, since Federation in 1901. Australia is the world's sixth oldest continuous democracy and largely operates as a two-party system in which voting is compulsory. The Economist Intelligence Unit rated Australia a "full democracy" in 2018. Australian is also a federation, where power is divided between the federal government and the states and territories.

1949 Australian federal election

The 1949 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 10 December 1949. All 121 seats in the House of Representatives and 42 of the 60 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Labor Party, led by Prime Minister Ben Chifley, was defeated by the opposition Liberal–Country coalition under Robert Menzies. Menzies became prime minister for a second time, his first term having ended in 1941. This election marked the end of the 8 year Curtin-Chifley Labor Government that had been in power since 1941 and started the 23 year Liberal/Country Coalition Government. This was the first time the Liberal party won government at the federal level.

1934 Australian federal election

The 1934 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 15 September 1934. All 74 seats in the House of Representatives, and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent United Australia Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Joseph Lyons formed a minority government, with 33 out of 74 seats in the House.

1931 Australian federal election general election

The 1931 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 19 December 1931. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election.

1929 Australian federal election

The 1929 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 12 October 1929. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives were up for election, but there was no Senate election. The election was caused by the defeat of the Stanley Bruce-Earle Page Government in the House of Representatives over the Maritime Industries Bill, Bruce having declared that the vote on the bill would constitute a vote of confidence in his government.

1928 Australian federal election

The 1928 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 17 November 1928. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist–Country coalition, led by Prime Minister Stanley Bruce won a record fifth consecutive election defeating the opposition Labor Party led by James Scullin.

1922 Australian federal election

The 1922 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 16 December 1922. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist Party, led by Prime Minister Billy Hughes lost its majority. However, the opposition Labor Party led by Matthew Charlton did not take office as the Nationalists sought a coalition with the fledgling Country Party led by Earle Page. The Country Party made Hughes's resignation the price for joining, and Hughes was replaced as Nationalist leader by Stanley Bruce.

1919 Australian federal election

The 1919 Australian federal election was held on 13 December 1919 to elect members to the Parliament of Australia. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist Party government won re-election, with Prime Minister Billy Hughes continuing in office.

1917 Australian federal election

The 1917 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 5 May 1917. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist Party, led by Prime Minister Billy Hughes, defeated the opposition Labor Party led by Frank Tudor in a landslide.

George Wise (Australian politician) Australian politician and solicitor

George Henry Wise was an Australian politician. He held the Division of Gippsland in federal parliament and served as Postmaster-General (1920–1921) under Prime Minister Billy Hughes. He was a lawyer by profession.

This is a list of the members of the Australian House of Representatives in the 10th Australian Parliament, which was elected at the 1925 election on 14 November 1925. The incumbent Nationalist Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia Stanley Bruce in power since 1922 with coalition partner the Country Party led by Earle Page defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Matthew Charlton. The Nationalist won 11 seats, they did not take at the 1922 election, although five of them were held by Liberal Party members, who had joined the Nationalist government after Bruce became Prime Minister in February 1923.

This article provides information on candidates who stood for the 1925 Australian federal election. The election was held on 14 November 1925.

This is a list of members of the Australian Senate from 1929 to 1932. Half of its members were elected at the 14 November 1925 election and had terms starting on 1 July 1926 and finishing on 30 June 1932; the other half were elected at the 17 November 1928 election and had terms starting on 1 July 1929 and finishing on 30 June 1935. The process for filling casual vacancies was complex. While senators were elected for a six year term, people appointed to a casual vacancy only held office until the earlier of the next election for the House of Representatives or the Senate.

2013 Australian federal election Election held on 7 September 2013

The 2013 Australianfederal election to elect the members of the 44th Parliament of Australia took place on 7 September 2013. The centre-right Liberal/National Coalition opposition led by Opposition leader Tony Abbott of the Liberal Party of Australia and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia, led by Warren Truss, defeated the incumbent centre-left Labor Party government of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd by an 18-seat 3.6 percentage point two-party swing resulting in a landslide win for the Coalition. Labor had been in government for 6 years since first being elected in the 2007 election .This election marked the end of the 6-year Rudd-Gillard Labor government and the start of the current Abbott-Turnbull-Morrison Liberal-National Coalition government. Abbott was sworn in by the Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, as Australia's new Prime Minister on 18 September 2013, along with the Abbott Ministry and the members of the House of Representatives. The 44th Parliament of Australia opened on 12 November 2013, which is taken to be the commencement of the term of members of the House of Representatives. The new senators were sworn in by the next Governor-General Peter Cosgrove on 7 July 2014, with their six-year terms commencing on 1 July.

History of the Australian Labor Party

The history of the Australian Labor Party has its origins in the Labour parties founded in the 1890s in the Australian colonies prior to federation. Labor tradition ascribes the founding of Queensland Labour to a meeting of striking pastoral workers under a ghost gum tree in Barcaldine, Queensland in 1891. The Balmain, New South Wales branch of the party claims to be the oldest in Australia. Labour as a parliamentary party dates from 1891 in New South Wales and South Australia, 1893 in Queensland, and later in the other colonies.

References