1926 Giro d'Italia

Last updated
1926 Giro d'Italia
Giro Italia 1926-map.png
Race Route
Race details
Dates15 May – 6 June
Stages12
Distance3,249.7 km (2,019 mi)
Winning time137h 55' 59"
Results
  WinnerFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)(Legnano)
  SecondFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)(Legnano)
  ThirdFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Arturo Bresciani  (ITA)(Bianchi)

  Team Legnano
  1925
1927  

The 1926 Giro d'Italia was the 14th edition of the Giro d'Italia, a cycling race organized and sponsored by the newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport . The race began on 15 May in Milan with a stage that stretched 275 km (171 mi) to Turin, finishing back in Milan on 6 June after a 288 km (179 mi) stage and a total distance covered of 3,249.7 km (2,019 mi). The race was won by the Giovanni Brunero of the Legnano team. Second and third respectively were the Italian riders Alfredo Binda and Arturo Bresciani. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7]

Giro dItalia cycling road race held in Italy

The Giro d'Italia is an annual multiple-stage bicycle race primarily held in Italy, while also starting in, or passing through, other countries. The first race was organized in 1909 to increase sales of the newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport; and is still run by a subsidiary of that paper's owner. The race has been held annually since its first edition in 1909, except during the two world wars. As the Giro gained prominence and popularity the race was lengthened, and the peloton expanded from primarily Italian participation to riders from all over the world. The Giro is a UCI World Tour event, which means that the teams that compete in the race are mostly UCI WorldTeams, with some additional teams invited as 'wild cards'.

Newspaper Scheduled publication containing news of events, articles, features, editorials, and advertising

A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background.

<i>La Gazzetta dello Sport</i> Italian sports newspaper

La Gazzetta dello Sport is an Italian daily newspaper dedicated to coverage of various sports. Founded in 1896, it is the most widely read daily newspaper of any kind in Italy. The Sunday edition is called La Gazzetta Sportiva.

Contents

Participants

Of the 206 riders that began the Giro d'Italia on 15 May, 40 of them made it to the finish in Milan on 6 June. Riders were allowed to ride on their own or as a member of a team. There were six teams that competed in the race: Berrenttini, Ganna, Legnano, Météore, Olympia, and Wolsit. [8] Eighteen of the 206 riders were on a team. [8]

Milan Italian city

Milan is a city in northern Italy, capital of Lombardy, and the second-most populous city in Italy after Rome, with the city proper having a population of 1,395,274 while its metropolitan city has a population of 3,255,773. Its continuously built-up urban area has a population estimated to be about 5,270,000 over 1,891 square kilometres. The wider Milan metropolitan area, known as Greater Milan, is a polycentric metropolitan region that extends over central Lombardy and eastern Piedmont and which counts an estimated total population of 7.5 million, making it by far the largest metropolitan area in Italy and the 54th largest in the world. Milan served as capital of the Western Roman Empire from 286 to 402 and the Duchy of Milan during the medieval period and early modern age.

The peloton was primarily composed of Italians. [8] The field featured two former Giro d'Italia champions in two-time winners Costante Girardengo and Giovanni Brunero, 1924 winner Giuseppe Enrici, and returning champion Alfredo Binda. [8] Other notable Italian riders that started the race included Giovanni Rossignoli and Angelo Gremo. [8]

Costante Girardengo Italian racing cyclist

Costante Girardengo was an Italian professional road bicycle racer, considered by many to be one of the finest riders in the history of the sport. He was the first rider to be declared a "Campionissimo" or "champion of champions" by the Italian media and fans. At the height of his popularity in the 1920s he was said to be more popular than Mussolini and it was decreed that all express trains should stop in his home town Novi Ligure, an honour only normally awarded to heads of state.

Giovanni Giuseppe Brunero was an Italian professional road racing cyclist.

1924 Giro dItalia cycling race

The 1924 Giro d'Italia was the 12th edition of the Giro d'Italia, a cycling race organized and sponsored by the newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport. The race began on 10 May in Milan with a stage that stretched 300.3 km (187 mi) to Genoa, finishing back in Milan on 1 June after a 313 km (194 mi) stage and a total distance covered of 3,613 km (2,245 mi). The race was won by the Italian rider Giuseppe Enrici. Second and third respectively were the Italian riders Federico Gay and Angiolo Gabrielli.

Final standings

Stage results

Stage results [8]
StageDateCourseDistanceType [Notes 1] WinnerRace Leader
115 May Milan to Turin 275 km (171 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Domenico Piemontesi  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Domenico Piemontesi  (ITA)
217 May Turin to Genoa 250.5 km (156 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Domenico Piemontesi  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Domenico Piemontesi  (ITA)
319 May Genoa to Florence 312 km (194 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Domenico Piemontesi  (ITA)
421 May Florence to Rome 287.2 km (178 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Costante Girardengo  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Costante Girardengo  (ITA)
523 May Rome to Naples 232.1 km (144 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Costante Girardengo  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Costante Girardengo  (ITA)
625 May Naples to Foggia 262.9 km (163 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Costante Girardengo  (ITA)
727 May Foggia to Sulmona 250.8 km (156 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)
829 May Sulmona to Terni 266.5 km (166 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)
931 May Terni to Bologna 357.8 km (222 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)
102 June Bologna to Udine 355.2 km (221 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Pierino Bestetti  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)
114 June Udine to Verona 291.7 km (181 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)
126 June Verona to Milan 288 km (179 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)
Total3,429.7 km (2,131 mi)

General classification

There were 40 cyclists who had completed all twelve stages. For these cyclists, the times they had needed in each stage was added up for the general classification. The cyclist with the least accumulated time was the winner.

General classification in the Giro dItalia

The general classification in the Giro d'Italia is the most important classification of the Giro d'Italia, which determines who is the overall winner. It is therefore considered more important than secondary classifications as the points classification or the mountains classification.

Final general classification (1–10) [8] [9]
RankNameTeamTime
1Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giovanni Brunero  (ITA)Legnano137h 55' 59"
2Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Alfredo Binda  (ITA)Legnano+ 15' 28"
3Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Arturo Bresciani  (ITA)Olympia+ 54' 41"
4Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Ermanno Vallazza  (ITA)Legnano+ 1h 11' 38"
5Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giuseppe Enrici  (ITA)+ 1h 15' 57"
6Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Pierino Bestetti  (ITA)Wolsit+ 1h 26' 00"
7Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Gianbattista Gilli  (ITA)Olympia+ 2h 02' 52"
8Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Angelo Gremo  (ITA)Météore+ 3h 16' 58"
9Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Michele Robotti  (ITA)Berrettini+ 3h 41' 39"
10Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Ezio Cortesia  (ITA)Ganna+ 3h 59' 18"

Notes

  1. In 1926, there was no distinction in the rules between plain stages and mountain stages; the icons shown here indicate that the first, third, fourth, sixth, seventh, eighth, eleventh, and twelfth stages included major mountains.

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References

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