1929 Tour de France

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1929 Tour de France
Tour de France 1929.png
Route of the 1929 Tour de France followed counterclockwise, starting in Paris
Race details
Dates30 June – 28 July
Stages22
Distance5,286 km (3,285 mi)
Winning time186h 39' 16"
Results
Jersey yellow.svg WinnerFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice De Waele  (BEL)(Alcyon)
  SecondFlag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giuseppe Pancera  (ITA)(La Rafale)
  ThirdFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Jef Demuysere  (BEL)(Lucifer)
  1928
1930  

The 1929 Tour de France was the 23rd edition of the Tour de France, taking place from 30 June to 28 July. It consisted of 22 stages over 5,286 km (3,285 mi).

Tour de France Cycling competition

The Tour de France is an annual men's multiple stage bicycle race primarily held in France, while also occasionally passing through nearby countries. Like the other Grand Tours, it consists of 21 day-long stages over the course of 23 days. It has been described as "the world’s most prestigious and most difficult bicycle race".

Contents

Nicolas Frantz had won two consecutive Tours, in 1927 and 1928, and was looking for a third. In addition the 1926 Tour winner, Lucien Buysse, was looking for another title.

Nicolas Frantz Luxembourgian racing cyclist

Nicolas Frantz was a Luxembourgish bicycle racer with 60 professional racing victories over his 12-year career. He rode for the Thomann team in 1923 and then for Alcyon-Dunlop from 1924 to 1931. He won the Tour de France in 1927 and 1928.

1927 Tour de France cycling race

The 1927 Tour de France was the 21st edition of the Tour de France, taking place from 19 June to 17 July. It consisted of 24 stages over 5,398 km (3,354 mi).

1928 Tour de France cycling race

The 1928 Tour de France was the 22nd edition of the Tour de France, taking place from 17 June to 15 July. It consisted of 22 stages over 5,376 km (3,340 mi).

Victor Fontan, leader of the general classification and therefore wearer of the yellow jersey, crashed in the Pyrenees during stage 10, breaking the forks to his bicycle. At that time, a rule stated that a rider must finish a stage with the bike he started it with. Fontan went house to house, looking for a bike to borrow. He eventually found one and rode 145 km to the finish line, with his broken bike strapped to his back. At the end of the day Fontan quit the race in tears. The rule was removed for the 1930 Tour de France. [1]

Victor Fontan Road bicycle racer

Victor Fontan was a French cyclist who led the 1929 Tour de France but dropped out after knocking at doors at night to ask for another bicycle. His plight led to a change of rules to prevent its happening again. He was also one of three riders who all wore the yellow jersey of leadership on the same day, the only time it has happened.

General classification in the Tour de France Classification that determines the winner of the Tour de France

The general classification is the most important classification, the one by which the winner of the Tour de France is determined. Since 1919, the leader of the general classification wears the yellow jersey.

Pyrenees Range of mountains in southwest Europe

The Pyrenees is a range of mountains in southwest Europe that forms a natural border between Spain and France. Reaching a height of 3,404 metres (11,168 ft) altitude at the peak of Aneto, the range separates the Iberian Peninsula from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay to the Mediterranean Sea.

The Tour was won by Belgian Maurice De Waele, although he was sick during the race. The Tour organisation was not content with the outcome of the race, because the strongest team Alycon had been able to deliver the winner even though he was sick, so they changed the rules after the 1929 Tour de France, and for the next years there were no sponsored teams but only national or regional teams. [2]

Maurice De Waele cyclist

Maurice De Waele was a Belgian professional road bicycle racer.

Changes from the previous Tour

In 1928, many stages were in the team-time-trial format, where the teams started separately. The Tour organisation had invented this rule to make the flat stages more competitive, but it had the effect that the public stopped following the race. Therefore, in 1929 the most stages were run in the normal format, except for stages 12, 19 and 20, the stages that were expected to be raced slower than 30 km/h. [1] > [3]

The entire podium in 1928 was occupied by members from the Alcyon cycling team. The tour organisation wanted the Tour to be an individual race, so in 1929 the teams were officially not there, and riders started in the A-category (professional cyclists) or as touriste-routiers (semi-professional or amateur). [4]

In 1928, cyclist could be helped when they had a flat tire; in 1929 this rule was reversed, and cyclists had to fix their flat tires by themselves. [1]

Participants

Race overview

Maurice De Waele, winner of the 1929 Tour de France Maurice De Waele Tour de France 1929.JPG
Maurice De Waele, winner of the 1929 Tour de France

In the first stages, the cyclists remained close to each other. Aimé Dossche won the first stage, and kept the lead for the next two stages. [1] In the fourth stage, Maurice De Waele and Louis De Lannoy escaped from the bunch. De Lannoy won the stage, while Dewaele took over the lead in the general classification. [1]

In the seventh stage, De Waele had two flat tires, and was not in the first group. [1] Three man from that first group now shared the lead. [4] There was no rule for this situation, so all three cyclists were given the yellow jersey in the next stage. [1] In stage eight, this situation was solved, as Gaston Rebry took over the lead. [1]

In the ninth stage, the first mountain stage, Lucien Buysse, the winner of the 1926 Tour de France and now racing as a touriste-routier, took the lead early in the race, and mounted the Aubisque first. In the descent, De Waele and Victor Fontan caught him. [5] De Waele then punctured and lost eight minutes. [1] Fontan was caught by the Spaniard Salvador Cardona, but his second place in the stage gave him the lead in the general classification. [5] In the tenth stage, after only seven kilometers [5] Fontan broke his fork. Some sources say he hit a dog, others say he fell in a gutter. [1] He is said to have knocked on every door of a small town before he found a replacement bicycle. [4] According to the rules, he had to finish the race with the bicycle he started with, so he strapped the broken bicycle to his back, and rode for 145 through the Pyrenees with a broken bicycle on his back, before he finally gave up. [1]

After that tenth stage, Maurice De Waele was leading the general classification. One hour before the start of the fifteenth stage, he collapsed. The Alcyon team asked for the stage to be started one hour later, which was granted. [1] De Waele was literally dragged on his bicycle, and his teammates rode shoulder-to-shoulder to prevent opponents from attacking. [4] At the end of the stage, his teammates had helped him so much that he had lost only 13 minutes to the winner, finishing in 11th place. In the sixteenth stage, De Waele became better, and only Charles Pélissier could win time on him. [6]

After the race was over, Jef Demuysere received 25 minutes penalty time in the general classification because he had taken drinks where this was not allowed. This moved him from the second place in the general classification to the third place. [3]

Results

In stages 12, 19 and 20, the cyclists started in teams. The cyclist who reached the finish fastest was the winner of the stage. In the other stages all cyclists started together. The time that each cyclist required to finish the stage was recorded. For the general classification, these times were added up; the cyclist with the least accumulated time was the race leader, identified by the yellow jersey.

Stage results

Stage characteristics and winners [3] [7] [8]
StageDateCourseDistanceType [n 1] WinnerRace leader
130 June Paris to Caen 206 km (128 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Aimé Dossche  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Aimé Dossche  (BEL)
21 July Caen to Cherbourg 140 km (87 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of France.svg  André Leducq  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Aimé Dossche  (BEL)
32 July Cherbourg to Dinan 199 km (124 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Omer Taverne  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Aimé Dossche  (BEL)
43 July Dinan to Brest 206 km (128 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Louis Delannoy  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
54 July Brest to Vannes 208 km (129 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Gustaaf van Slembrouck  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
65 July Vannes to Les Sables d'Olonne 206 km (128 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of France.svg  Paul Le Drogo  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
76 July Les Sables d'Olonne to Bordeaux 285 km (177 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Luxembourg.svg  Nicolas Frantz  (LUX)Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Nicolas Frantz  (LUX)
Flag of France.svg  André Leducq  (FRA)
Flag of France.svg  Victor Fontan  (FRA) [n 2]
87 July Bordeaux to Bayonne 182 km (113 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of France.svg  Julien Moineau  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Gaston Rebry  (BEL)
99 July Bayonne to Luchon 363 km (226 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Spain (1785-1873, 1875-1931).svg  Salvador Cardona  (ESP)Flag of France.svg  Victor Fontan  (FRA)
1011 July Luchon to Perpignan 323 km (201 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Jef Demuysere  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1113 July Perpignan to Marseille 366 km (227 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of France.svg  André Leducq  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1215 July Marseille to Cannes 191 km (119 mi) Time Trial.svg Team time trial Flag of France.svg  Marcel Bidot  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1316 July Cannes to Nice 133 km (83 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of France.svg  Benoît Fauré  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1418 July Nice to Grenoble 333 km (207 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Gaston Rebry  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1520 July Grenoble to Evian 329 km (204 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Julien Vervaecke  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1622 July Evian to Belfort 283 km (176 mi)Mountainstage.svgStage with mountain(s)Flag of France.svg  Charles Pélissier  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1723 July Belfort to Strasbourg 145 km (90 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of France.svg  André Leducq  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1824 July Strasbourg to Metz 165 km (103 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of France.svg  André Leducq  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
1925 July Metz to Charleville 159 km (99 mi) Time Trial.svg Team time trial Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Bernard van Rysselberghe  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
2026 July Charleville to Malo-les-Bains 270 km (170 mi) Time Trial.svg Team time trial Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
2127 July Malo-les-Bains to Dieppe 234 km (145 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of France.svg  André Leducq  (FRA)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
2228 July Dieppe to Paris 332 km (206 mi)Plainstage.svgPlain stageFlag of Luxembourg.svg  Nicolas Frantz  (LUX)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice Dewaele  (BEL)
Total5,286 km (3,285 mi) [9]

General classification

During the 1929 Tour de France, the cyclists did not race in trade teams, but still the cyclists of the same team cooperated.

Final general classification (1–10) [3]
RankRiderSponsorTime
1Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Maurice De Waele  (BEL) Alcyon 186h 39' 15"
2Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Giuseppe Pancera  (ITA) La Rafale 44' 23"
3Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Joseph Demuysere  (BEL) Lucifer 57' 10"
4Flag of Spain (1785-1873, 1875-1931).svg  Salvador Cardona  (ESP) Fontan–Wolber 57' 46"
5Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Nicolas Frantz  (LUX) Alcyon 58' 00"
6Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Louis Delannoy  (BEL) La Française +1h 06' 09"
7Flag of France.svg  Antonin Magne  (FRA) Alleluia–Wolber +1h 08' 00"
8Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Julien Vervaecke  (BEL) Alcyon +2h 01' 37"
9Flag of France.svg  Pierre Magne  (FRA) Alleluia–Wolber +2h 03' 00"
10Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Gaston Rebry  (BEL) Alcyon +2h 17' 49"

Other classifications

The organing newspaper, l'Auto named a meilleur grimpeur (best climber), an unofficial precursor to the modern King of the Mountains competition. This award was won by Victor Fontan. [10]

Aftermath

After Victor Fontan had to give up in the tenth stage because of mechanical problems while he was leading the race, journalist Louis Delblat wrote that the rules should be changed, because a Tour should not be lost because of mechanical problems. Eventually the rule changed, but only after Tour director Henri Desgrange retired. [4]

The team-time-trial format, which had been introduced to equalize power between the teams, had completely failed. It was removed for the 1930 Tour de France. [2] Between 1935 and 1937, the concept was seen back, and returned again in 1954.

Henri Desgrange was angry at the outcome of the race. The strongest trade team decided who the winner was, while Desgrange wanted the strongest individual to win. Immediately after the 1929 Tour de France, he announced that he would drastically change the rules for the 1930 Tour de France. [11] He removed the trade teams completely, and replaced them by national teams. [4]

The winner of the race, Dewaele, would never reach his level of 1929 again. In 1931 he ended his Tour de France career with a fifth place. [12]

Notes

  1. The stages 12, 19 and 20, indicated by the clock icon, were run as team time trials. The other stages, indicated by the other icons, were run individually, and the icons indicate whether the stage included mountains.
  2. After the seventh stage, Frantz, Leducq and Fontan led the general classification with exactly the same time. There was no rule in this situation to determine who was the leader, so all three were considered leaders.

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References

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  2. 1 2 "The Tour - Year 1929". Amaury Sport Organisation. Archived from the original on 2 September 2016. Retrieved 30 September 2009.
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  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Tom James (15 August 2003). "1929: A "moribund" winner" . Retrieved 29 September 2009.
  5. 1 2 3 "1929: Maurice Dewaele wint na verschrikkelijke martelgang" (in Dutch). Tourdefrance.nl. 19 March 2003. Archived from the original on 16 October 2012. Retrieved 30 September 2009.
  6. Barry Boyce (2004). "The Victory of a Moribund". Cycling revealed. Retrieved 30 September 2009.
  7. Augendre 2016, p. 27.
  8. Arian Zwegers. "Tour de France GC top ten". CVCC. Archived from the original on 27 September 2009. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  9. Augendre 2016, p. 108.
  10. Michiel van Lonkhuyzen. "Tour-giro-vuelta". Archived from the original on 26 September 2009. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  11. Guérin, Robert (1 August 1929). "Le Tour de France est mort! Vive le Tour de France!" (PDF). l'Ouest-Eclair (in French). Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 July 2011. Retrieved 18 August 2010.
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Bibliography

Commons-logo.svg Media related to 1929 Tour de France at Wikimedia Commons