1932–33 Northern Rugby Football League season

Last updated
1932–33 Northern Rugby Football League season
LeagueNorthern Rugby Football League
Teams28
Champions Redscolours.svg Salford
League Leaders Redscolours.svg Salford
Top point-scorer(s) Wigancolours.svg Jim Sullivan 307
Top try-scorer(s) Rhinoscolours.svg Eric Harris 57
Seasons

The 1932–33 Northern Rugby Football League season was the 38th season of rugby league football. Salford won their second Rugby Football League Championship when they beat Swinton 15-5 in the play-off final. They had also finished the regular season as league leaders. [1] The Challenge Cup winners were Huddersfield who beat Warrington 21-17 in the final. Salford won the Lancashire League, and Castleford won the Yorkshire League. Warrington beat St.Helens 10–9 to win the Lancashire County Cup, and Leeds beat Wakefield Trinity 8–0 to win the Yorkshire County Cup. This season, Widnes' Jimmy Hoey became rugby league's first player to play and score in every one of his club's matches in an entire season. [2]

Contents

Championship

TeamPldWDLPFPAPts
1 Salford 38312575116564
2 Swinton 382621041224754
3 York 382441057127352
4 Wigan 382521171741152
5 Warrington 382601262542652
6 Barrow 382421250833250
7 Hunslet 382301552936546
8 Castleford 382141340332646
9 Huddersfield 382101750433342
10 Leeds 382021654442342
11 St. Helens 382021655449442
12 Widnes 381921744640640
13 Broughton Rangers 381841628932240
14 Oldham 381911843846439
15 Rochdale Hornets 381911849753339
16 St Helens Recs 381641841941636
17 Keighley 381631941842835
18 Hull 381622046746034
19 Wakefield Trinity 381541937048334
20 Halifax 381612143439233
21 Hull Kingston Rovers 381502338349030
22 Bradford Northern 381422237758730
23 Leigh 381502336461030
24 Dewsbury 381402436150328
25 Batley 381212529345025
26 Featherstone Rovers 38822830259418
27 Wigan Highfield 38822824073418
28 Bramley 38613121976813

Play-off

Semi-finals Championship Final
      
1 Salford 14
4 Wigan 2
Salford 15
Swinton 5
2 Swinton 11
3 York 4

Challenge Cup

Huddersfield beat Warrington 21-17 in the final at Wembley before a crowd of 41,784. This was Huddersfield’s fourth Cup Final win in as many Cup Final appearances, and they became the first team to win the trophy more than three times. This was also the fifth Cup Final defeat for Warrington. [3]

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References

  1. "1932-33 Season summary". Archived from the original on 2009-08-14. Retrieved 2009-08-08.
  2. "Jimmy Hoey". Hall of Fame. rugby.widnes.tv. Retrieved 21 January 2014.
  3. "RFL Challenge Cup Roll of Honour". Archived from the original on 2009-08-11. Retrieved 2009-08-07.

Sources