1933 Finnish parliamentary election

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Parliamentary elections were held in Finland between 1 and 3 July 1933. [1] The Social Democratic Party remained the largest party in Parliament with 78 of the 200 seats. However, Prime Minister Toivo Mikael Kivimäki of the National Progressive Party continued in office after the elections, supported by Pehr Evind Svinhufvud and quietly by most Agrarians and Social Democrats. They considered Kivimäki's right-wing government a lesser evil than political instability (various short-lived governments) or an attempt by the radical right to gain power. Voter turnout was 62.2%. [2]

Contents

Background

The main campaign issues were the differing attitudes towards democracy and the rule of law between the Patriotic Electoral Alliance (National Coalitioners and Patriotic People's Movement) and the Legality Front (Social Democrats, Agrarians, Swedish People's Party and Progressives). The Patriotic Electoral Alliance favoured continuing the search for suspected Communists - the Communist Party and its affiliated organizations had been outlawed in 1930 as treasonous organizations - and was against the Social Democrats' joining the government under any circumstances. The Legality Front did not want to spend any significant time on searching suspected Communists, but rather wanted to concentrate on keeping the far right in check. The Lapua Movement had been outlawed after its failed Mäntsälä rebellion in March 1932, and the Patriotic People's Movement had been established as its successor later in 1932. President Svinhufvud (National Coalition) strictly guarded law and order, an attitude which made him somewhat suspicious of the Patriotic People's Movement's motives. Prime Minister Kivimäki (Progressive) led a right-wing minority government, which President Svinhufvud fully supported in the effort to fight the Great Depression. Despite the Patriotic Electoral Alliance's vigorous election campaign, only about one-sixth of the participating Finnish voters supported it. [3] [4]

Results

1933 Eduskunta.svg
PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Social Democratic Party 413,55137.378+12
Agrarian League 249,75822.553–6
National Coalition Party-Patriotic People's Movement 187,52716.932–10
Swedish People's Party 115,43310.421+1
National Progressive Party 82,1297.4110
Small Farmers' Party of Finland 37,5443.43+2
People's Party 9,3900.82New
List for the Working People2,6670.20New
People's Organization of Finland2,1030.20New
List of Real Finns, Temperance People etc.1,4760.10New
National Socialist League of Finland 1,4060.10New
List of Working People, Peasants and Intellectuals7870.10New
List of Recession Men6450.10New
List of Jaakko Seise6300.10New
Rural People's Party–Party of Finnish Work3110.00New
Party of Finnish Work2260.00New
List "V.F.Johanson and M.Saarikoski"1450.00New
List of National Economy1010.00New
List F (Läheniemists)960.00New
Others1,8980.20
Invalid/blank votes4,917
Total1,112,7401002000
Source: Nohlen & Stöver, Tilastokeskus 2004, [5] Suomen virallinen tilasto
Popular vote
SDP
37.33%
ML
22.54%
KOK-IKL
16.93%
RKP
10.42%
ED
7.41%
SPP
3.39%
Others
1.96%
Parliament seats
SDP
39.00%
ML
26.50%
RKP
10.50%
KOK
9.00%
IKL
7.00%
ED
5.50%
SPP
1.50%
Others
1.00%

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References

  1. Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p606 ISBN   978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. Nohlen & Stöver, p607
  3. Seppo Zetterberg et al., eds., A Small Giant of the Finnish History / Suomen historian pikkujättiläinen, Helsinki: WSOY, 2003
  4. Sakari Virkkunen, Finland's Presidents I / Suomen presidentit I, Helsinki: WSOY, 1994
  5. Tiedosto "595. Eduskuntavaalit 1927–2003 [ permanent dead link ] (Tilastokeskus 2004)