1935 New York Yankees season

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1935 New York Yankees
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert
General manager(s) Ed Barrow
Manager(s) Joe McCarthy
Local televisionnone
Local radionone
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The 1935 New York Yankees season was the team's 33rd season in New York and its 35th season overall. The team finished with a record of 89–60, finishing 3 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

New York Yankees Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in the Bronx, New York, United States

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City; the other club is the National League (NL)'s New York Mets. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles. Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.

The 1935 Detroit Tigers won the 1935 World Series, defeating the Chicago Cubs 4 games to 2. The season was their 35th since they entered the American League in 1901. It was the first World Series championship for the Tigers.

Joe McCarthy (manager) baseball manager, managed New York Yankees 1931-1946

Joseph Vincent McCarthy was a manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the "Bronx Bombers" teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. The first manager to win pennants with both National and American League teams, he won nine league titles overall and seven World Series championships – a record tied only by Casey Stengel. McCarthy was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1957.

Contents

Offseason

Babe Ruth American baseball player

George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter still stands as of 2019. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.

Regular season

Once again, the Yankees finished second best in the American League, although they came within three games of the eventual world champions Detroit Tigers. This team was just a year away from starting a 4-year dominance of baseball greatness.

Although Lefty Gomez (12–15) fell off dramatically from his form from the previous four seasons, the Yanks still had the best pitching in the league. The New York staff led the AL in both ERA (3.60) and strikeouts (594). Red Ruffing was the top Yankee winner (16–11) for the first time in five years, followed by Johnny Broaca (15–7), a solid 25-year-old pitcher Johnny Allen (13–6), Johnny Murphy (10–5) and Vito Tamulis (10–5) were also consistent winners.

Before the season, the Yanks released legend Babe Ruth. Ruth, who never cared for Joe McCarthy, had asked Yankee owner Jake Ruppert, if he, Ruth, could manage the team. Ruppert steadfastly refused, and Ruth then asked to be set free. The Yanks worked out a deal with the Boston Braves in which Ruth would join the Braves in many capacities. So when Babe left the Yankees, it was more or less on amicable terms. His departure rendered the club, now Ruthless for the first time since 1919, short on color; home attendance sank to a partly 657,508. second lowest ever in Yankee Stadium.

Lou Gehrig (30 HRs, 119 RBIs, .329) was the only legitimate Yankees power hitter. He led the league in runs scored (125) and walks (132). That was the highest walk total of Gehrig's career-pitchers tended to work around Lou. Earle Combs known as both "The Kentucky Colonel" and "The Mail Carrier" wrapped up his great career. George Selkirk (11 HRs, 94 RBIs, .312) played Ruth's old right field position and performed splendidly. Another youngster Red Rolfe, became the third baseman and hit .300. This Yankee edition still had power, setting a major-league record for the most solo home runs in a single game – six. This was in a June 1 game with the Boston Red Sox (Dickey hit two, Frank Crosetti hit one, Ben Chapman hit one, Selkirk hit one and Rolfe hit one).

This young Yankee club showed real promise. But the team appeared to very much need another slugger to aid Gehrig and also to relieve some of the emotional emptiness that the team and the city of New York felt in Ruth's absence.

Season standings

American League WLPct.GB
Detroit Tigers 9358.616--
New York Yankees 8960.5973
Cleveland Indians 8271.53612
Boston Red Sox 7875.51016
Chicago White Sox 7478.48719½
Washington Senators 6786.43827
St. Louis Browns 6587.42828½
Philadelphia Athletics 5891.38934

Record vs. opponents

1935 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSCWSCLEDETNYYPHISTLWSH
Boston 13–99–13–19–139–1216–610–1212–10
Chicago 9–1310–1211–119–1112–1011–11–112–10
Cleveland 13–9–112–107–15–18–1412–1015–6–115–7
Detroit 13–911–1115–7–111–1114–517–512–10
New York 12–911–914–811–1114–612–1015–7
Philadelphia 6–1610–1210–125–146–1411–1110–12
St. Louis 12–1011–11–16–15–15–1710–1211–1110–11–1
Washington 10–1210–127–1510–127–1512–1011–10–1

Roster

1935 New York Yankees
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

OutfieldersManager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
C Bill Dickey 120448125.2791481
1B Lou Gehrig 149535176.32930119
2B Tony Lazzeri 130477130.2731383
3B Red Rolfe 149639192.300567
SS Frankie Crosetti 8730578.256850
OF Ben Chapman 140553160.289874
OF George Selkirk 128491153.3121194
OF Jess Hill 107392115.293433

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
Earle Combs 8929884.282335
Jack Saltzgaver 6114939.262318
Myril Hoag 4811028.255113
Blondy Ryan 3010525.238011
Arndt Jorgens 368420.23806
Joe Glenn 174310.23306
Nolen Richardson 124610.21705
Don Heffner 103611.30608
Dixie Walker 8132.15401

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Lefty Gomez 3424612153.18138
Red Ruffing 3022216113.1281
Johnny Broaca 292011573.5878
Johnny Allen 231671363.61113
Vito Tamulis 30160.21054.0957

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Johnny Murphy 401171054.0828
Jumbo Brown 2087.1653.6141

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGWLSVERASO
Jimmie DeShong 294133.2630
Pat Malone 293535.4325
Russ Van Atta 50003.863

Farm system

LevelTeamLeagueManager
AA Newark Bears International League Bob Shawkey
AA Oakland Oaks Pacific Coast League Ossie Vitt
A Binghamton Triplets New York–Pennsylvania League Billy Meyer
B Norfolk Tars Piedmont League Bill Skiff
C Akron Yankees Middle Atlantic League Johnny Neun
C Joplin Miners Western Association Runt Marr and Stanley Hino
D Bassett Furniture Makers Bi-State League Lefty Jenkins
D Washington Generals Pennsylvania State Association Benny Bengough

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Binghamton [2]

Notes

  1. Babe Ruth page at Baseball Reference
  2. Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

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References