1944 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

Last updated
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1944
Championship Details
Dates
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Dublin (7th title)
Captain Doreen Rogers
Manager
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Antrim
Marcella Quinn
Manager
Matches played2

The 1944 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1944 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin, who defeated Antrim by a 17-point margin in the final. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] Gate receipts were £211.

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Contents

Structure

The altercation with Dublin over the ban on hockey players re-emerged in 1943 and was compounded by another with Cork over male officials and they withdrew from the Camogie Association. In the absence of Cork, Clare defeated Waterford 3–1 to 3–0 in the Munster final to win their first Munster championship. They failed to score against Dublin in the semi-final while a late goal from Bridie O'Neill gave Antrim a semi-final victory over Galway.

Camogie Association organization

The Camogie Association organises and promotes the sport of camogie in Ireland and across the world. The association has close ties with the Gaelic Athletic Association.

Final

The weekend before the final Dublin travelled to Cork, who had not participated in the championship, and were defeated 3–0 to 1–3. This raised questions about the validity of the championship, as well as Dublin's legality for having played an unaffiliated team. Bishop of Down and Connor, Daniel Mageean threw in the ball between Dublin and Antrim in final.

Bishop Daniel Mageean D.D. 6 May 1882 - 17 January 1962 was an Irish Roman Catholic Prelate and until 1962 he held the title Lord Bishop of Down and Connor.

Final stages

Dublin 8–7 – 0–0 Clare

Antrim 3–2 – 2–2 Galway

Dublin 5–4 –0–0 Antrim
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Dublin
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Antrim
Dublin:
GK1 Bríd Kenny (Col San Dominic)
FB2 Rose Martin (Austin Stacks)
RWB3 Patty Kenny (Col San Dominic)
CB4 Rose Fletcher (Scoil Bríghde)
LWB5 Sheila McMahon (Austin Stacks)
MF6 Carmel Keogh (GSR)
MF7 Kathleen Cody (GSR) (2–2)
MF8 Kathleen Mills (GSR)
RWF9 Īde O'Kiely (UCD) (1–0)
CF10 Elizabeth Mulcahy (UCD) (0–2)
LWF11 Doreen Rogers (Austin Stacks) (2–0)
FF12 Maura Moore (Optimists)
Antrim:
GK1Patsy Smith
FB2Marcella Quinn
RWB3Betty Stafford
CB4Moya Branigan
LWB5Bridie Murray
MF6Marie O'Gorman
MF7Claire McDermott
MF8Winnie Storey
RWF9Bridie O'Neill
CF10Mavis Madden
LWF11Claire Marshall
FF12Sue McKeown
Match Rules
  • 50 minutes
  • Replay if scores level
  • Maximum of 3 substitutions

See also

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

National Camogie League

The National Camogie League, known for sponsorship reasons as the Littlewoods Ireland Camogie Leagues, is the second most important competition in the Irish team sport of camogie, played exclusively by women. The competition is held in three divisions graded by ability. It was first played in 1976 for a trophy donated by Allied Irish Banks when Tipperary beat Wexford in a replayed final. Division Two was inaugurated in 1979 and won by Kildare.

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References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. Report of final in Irish Press, November 6, 1944
  3. Report of final in Irish Independent, November 6, 1944
  4. Report of final in Irish Times, November 6, 1944
  5. Report of final in Irish Examiner, November 6, 1944
  6. Report of final in Irish News, November 6, 1944
Preceded by
1943 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932–present
Succeeded by
1945 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship