1945 Venezuelan coup d'état

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Members of the Revolutionary Government Junta, from left to right: Mario Ricardo Vargas, Raul Leoni, Valmore Rodriguez, Romulo Betancourt, Carlos Delgado Chalbaud, Edmundo Fernandez and Gonzalo Barrios. Miraflores Palace, 1945 JRG, 1945.JPG
Members of the Revolutionary Government Junta, from left to right: Mario Ricardo Vargas, Raúl Leoni, Valmore Rodríguez, Rómulo Betancourt, Carlos Delgado Chalbaud, Edmundo Fernández and Gonzalo Barrios. Miraflores Palace, 1945

The 1945 Venezuelan coup d'état took place on 18 October 1945, when the president Isaías Medina Angarita was overthrown by a combination of a military rebellion and a popular movement led by Democratic Action. [1] The coup led to a three-year period of government known as El Trienio Adeco, which saw the first participant presidential elections in Venezuelan history, beginning with the 1946 Venezuelan Constituent Assembly election. The 1947 Venezuelan general election saw Democratic Action formally elected to office (with Rómulo Gallegos as President, replacing interim President Rómulo Betancourt), but it was removed from office shortly after in the 1948 Venezuelan coup d'état.

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References

  1. Jessup, John E. (1989). A Chronology of Conflict and Resolution, 1945-1985. New York: Greenwood Press. ISBN   0-313-24308-5.