1946–47 NHL season

Last updated
1946–47 NHL season
League National Hockey League
Sport Ice hockey
DurationOctober 16, 1946 – April 19, 1947
Number of games60
Number of teams6
Regular season
Season champion Montreal Canadiens
Season MVP Maurice Richard (Canadiens)
Top scorer Max Bentley (Black Hawks)
Stanley Cup
Champions Toronto Maple Leafs
  Runners-up Montreal Canadiens
NHL seasons

The 1946–47 NHL season was the 30th season of the National Hockey League. The Toronto Maple Leafs defeated the Montreal Canadiens in the 1947 Stanley Cup Final to win their sixth Stanley Cup championship.

Contents

League business

The NHL sought to renegotiate the existing professional-amateur agreement with the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (CAHA) in May 1946. The NHL proposed a flat payment of C$20,000 to cover all amateur players being signed to professional contracts, whereas the CAHA requested $2,000 for any player remaining in the NHL for more than a year. [1] The flat rate offer was later accepted with the stipulation that a junior-aged player could sign a contract at age 16, but not play professional until age 18. [2]

Tommy Gorman, who had been associated with the National Hockey League since its inception in 1917, announced his retirement in July 1946 as general manager of the Montreal Canadiens. He left behind him seven Stanley Cup champions and a hall of fame career as a coach and general manager. Frank Selke, released from the Toronto Maple Leafs, took over as general manager and would build the greatest dynasty hockey ever knew in the late 1950s. The Canadiens were in financial trouble at this time, despite their winning team and Selke would turn things around by buying up talent and keeping the cream of the crop, selling some players to teams that needed talent.

In December 1946, Selke proposed for professional teams to sponsor junior ice hockey teams under CAHA jurisdiction. The plan spread out talent instead of concentrating it on a few teams, provided a farm system for the NHL. [3] [4]

Red Dutton finally got to resign as president of the NHL, as Clarence Campbell, whom Frank Calder had been grooming as his successor, had come home from Europe. Campbell's experience in law and in hockey made him an ideal choice as president. Campbell hired Ken McKenzie, who would become the league's first publicity director, in September 1946, as his first hiring. McKenzie would go on to found The Hockey News and other publications, including the annual NHL Guide. [5]

Lorne Chabot, whose outstanding career as goalkeeper brought him two Stanley Cups, a Vezina Trophy and a first all-star selection, died October 10, five days after his 46th birthday. He had been suffering from kidney disease for some time and had been bedridden with severe arthritis.

Changes

The league extended the season from 50 games to 60 games. Linesmen are to be hired for each game from neutral cities. The system of hand gestures to symbolize penalties, devised by Bill Chadwick, is adopted officially by the NHL. The NHL announces that winners of its trophies, and members of the All-Star team will each receive $1,000. [6] Additionally, the league modified the captaincy rule so that captains wore the letter "C" and assistant captains wear the letter "A" on the front of their jerseys. [7]

Regular season

Detroit lost Syd Howe through retirement, but another Howe started his great career as Gordie Howe was Detroit's new rookie. In one of his first fights, he took care of Montreal's Rocket Richard. Sid Abel then added a taunt that enraged Richard and he broke Abel's nose in three places.

Chicago decided to purchase goaltender Paul Bibeault from Montreal and regretted it. He played badly, one of his losses being an 11–0 whitewashing at the hands of Toronto. Finally, president and general manager Bill Tobin had enough and brought up 20-year-old Emile Francis to replace him. He made his debut on February 9, 1947, in a 6–4 win over Boston. During the season, Maple Leaf Gardens was the first arena in the NHL to have Plexiglas inserted in the end zones of the rink. [8]

A donnybrook took place March 16, 1947, between the New York Rangers and Montreal Canadiens. Cal Gardner lifted Kenny Reardon's stick so that it clipped him in the mouth and a fight broke out between both teams and the fans. On that same night, Billy Taylor of Detroit set an NHL record with 7 assists in a 10–6 shootout win over the Chicago Black Hawks.

Bill Durnan broke George Hainsworth's record of consecutive Vezina Trophies as he won his fourth in a row, and Montreal again finished first. Max Bentley edged out Rocket Richard by one point and won the scoring championship. On February 12, 1947, Dit Clapper played his final game with the Boston Bruins. Before the start of the game, Clapper was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. He was the only active player to be inducted into the Hall. [9] The New York Rangers were the first NHL team to have their home games televised.

Final standings

National Hockey League [10]
GPWLTGFGADIFFPts
1 Montreal Canadiens 60341610189138+5178
2 Toronto Maple Leafs 60311910209172+3772
3 Boston Bruins 60262311190175+1563
4 Detroit Red Wings 60222711190193−355
5 New York Rangers 6022326167186−1950
6 Chicago Black Hawks 6019374193274−8142

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
      
1Montreal4
3 Boston 1
1 Montreal 2
2Toronto4
2Toronto4
4 Detroit 1

Semifinals

(1) Montreal Canadiens vs. (3) Boston Bruins

March 25Boston Bruins1–3Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Ken Smith (1) – 02:30First period05:58 – Toe Blake (1)
No scoringSecond periodNo scoring
No scoringThird period12:30 – Jimmy Peters (1)
16:27 – John Quilty (1)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
March 27Boston Bruins1–2OTMontreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
Bobby Bauer (1) – 03:02Second periodNo scoring
No scoringThird period19:08 – Ken Reardon (1)
No scoringFirst overtime period05:38 – Ken Mosdell (1)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
March 29Montreal Canadiens2–4Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Maurice Richard (1) – 00:38
Ken Mosdell (2) – 05:28
First periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond period10:45 – Milt Schmidt (1)
12:32 – Joe Carveth (1)
15:30 – Milt Schmidt (2)
No scoringThird period14:48 – Woody Dumart (1)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 1Montreal Canadiens5–1Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
Billy Reay (1) – 05:04
John Quilty (2) – 06:31
Billy Reay (2) – 10:38
Second period16:20 – Ken Smith (2)
Billy Reay (3) – 03:55
Billy Reay (4) – pp – 18:39
Third periodNo scoring
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 3Boston Bruins3–42OTMontreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
Joe Carveth (2) – 13:52
Milt Schmidt (3) – 14:14
Second period00:45 – ppToe Blake (2)
Ken Smith (3) – 11:40Third period07:43 – Maurice Richard (2)
17:55 – Maurice Richard (3)
No scoringSecond overtime period16:40 – John Quilty (3)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
Montreal won series 4–1

(2) Toronto Maple Leafs vs. (4) Detroit Red Wings

March 26Detroit Red Wings2–3OTToronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
Roy Conacher (1) – 02:21Second period07:01 – ppVic Lynn (1)
Pete Horeck (1) – 16:25Third period10:29 – Nick Metz (1)
No scoringFirst overtime period03:05 – Howie Meeker (1)
Red Almas Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 29Detroit Red Wings9–1Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Ted Lindsay (1) – pp – 03:20
Sid Abel (1) – pp – 04:20
First periodNo scoring
Billy Taylor (1) – 02:10Second period09:56 – Nick Metz (2)
Ted Lindsay (2) – 05:26
Roy Conacher (2) – 07:57
Pete Horeck (2) – 13:37
Jim Conacher (1) – 17:30
Roy Conacher (3) – 18:30
Eddie Bruneteau (1) – 19:00
Third periodNo scoring
Red Almas Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 1Toronto Maple Leafs4–1Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Don Metz (1) – 12:41First periodNo scoring
Harry Watson (1) – pp – 16:46Second period07:51 – ppJim Conacher (2)
Syl Apps (1) – 02:30
Syl Apps (2) – 16:20
Third periodNo scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Red Almas
April 3Toronto Maple Leafs4–1Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Howie Meeker (2) – 15:51First periodNo scoring
Ted Kennedy (1) – 13:13Second period06:18 – ppRoy Conacher (4)
Howie Meeker (3) – 09:11
Syl Apps (3) – 10:59
Third periodNo scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Red Almas
April 5Detroit Red Wings1–6Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Fern Gauthier (1) – sh – 17:51First period11:52 – shNick Metz (3)
16:00 – shJoe Klukay (1)
No scoringSecond period04:40 – ppDon Metz (2)
13:16 – Gaye Stewart (1)
No scoringThird period08:22 – pp – Nick Metz (4)
14:37 – Syl Apps (4)
Red Almas Goalie stats Turk Broda
Toronto won series 4–1

Stanley Cup Finals

April 8Toronto Maple Leafs0–6Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoringFirst period02:20 – ppBuddy O'Connor (1)
No scoringSecond period08:17 – ppBilly Reay (5)
09:41 – Maurice Richard (4)
No scoringThird period05:40 – George Allen (1)
11:04 – Billy Reay (6)
18:28 – Murph Chamberlain (1)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 10Toronto Maple Leafs4–0Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Ted Kennedy (2) – pp – 01:12
Vic Lynn (2) – pp – 01:36
First periodNo scoring
Gaye Stewart (2) – pp – 06:37Second periodNo scoring
Harry Watson (2) – pp – 11:55Third periodNo scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 12Montreal Canadiens2–4Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoringFirst period09:45 – Gus Mortson (1)
Leo Gravelle (1) – 12:33
Buddy O'Connor (2) – 18:30
Second period04:48 – ppBud Poile (1)
12:23 – Vic Lynn (3)
No scoringThird period19:13 – Ted Kennedy (3)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 15Montreal Canadiens1–2OTToronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Glen Harmon (1) – pp – 04:38First period06:13 – Harry Watson (3)
No scoringSecond periodNo scoring
No scoringThird periodNo scoring
No scoringFirst overtime period16:36 – Syl Apps (5)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 17Toronto Maple Leafs1–3Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoringFirst period01:23 – Maurice Richard (5)
08:29 – Leo Gravelle (2)
No scoringSecond period19:32 – pp – Maurice Richard (6)
Bud Poile (2) – 13:37Third periodNo scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 19Montreal Canadiens1–2Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Buddy O'Connor (3) – 00:25First periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond period05:39 – Vic Lynn (4)
No scoringThird period14:39 – Ted Kennedy (4)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Turk Broda
Toronto won series 4–2

Awards

Award winners
O'Brien Cup:
(Playoff runner-up)
Montreal Canadiens
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Best regular season record)
Montreal Canadiens
Calder Memorial Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Howie Meeker, Toronto Maple Leafs
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Bobby Bauer, Boston Bruins
Vezina Trophy:
(Goaltender of team with lowest GAA)
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens
All-Star teams
First team  Position  Second team
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens G Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins
Ken Reardon, Montreal Canadiens D Jack Stewart, Detroit Red Wings
Emile "Butch" Bouchard, Montreal Canadiens D Bill Quackenbush, Detroit Red Wings
Milt Schmidt, Boston Bruins C Max Bentley, Chicago Black Hawks
Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens RW Bobby Bauer, Boston Bruins
Doug Bentley, Chicago Black Hawks LW Woody Dumart, Boston Bruins

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

PlayerTeamGPGAPtsPIM
Max Bentley Chicago Black Hawks6029437212
Maurice Richard Montreal Canadiens6045267169
Billy Taylor Detroit Red Wings6017466335
Milt Schmidt Boston Bruins5927356240
Ted Kennedy Toronto Maple Leafs6028326027
Doug Bentley Chicago Black Hawks5221345518
Bobby Bauer Boston Bruins583024544
Roy Conacher Detroit Red Wings603024546
Bill Mosienko Chicago Black Hawks592527522
Woody Dumart Boston Bruins6024285212

Source: NHL [11]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Mins – Minutes Played; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts

PlayerTeamGPMinsGAGAAWLTSO
Bill Durnan Montreal Canadiens6036001382.303416104
Turk Broda Toronto Maple Leafs6036001722.873119104
Frank Brimsek Boston Bruins6036001752.922623113
Chuck Rayner New York Rangers5834801773.05223065
Harry Lumley Detroit Red Wings5231201593.062220103
Paul Bibeault Chicago Black Hawks4124601704.15132531
Emile Francis Chicago Black Hawks1911401045.4761210

Coaches

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1946–47 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1946–47 (listed with their last team):

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

Notes
  1. "NHL Makes $20,000 Offer: Pros Propose Flat Payment to C.A.H.A." Winnipeg Free Press. Winnipeg, Manitoba. May 3, 1946. p. 15. Lock-green.svg
  2. "C.A.H.A. and N.H.L. Reach Hockey Player Agreement". Winnipeg Free Press. Winnipeg, Manitoba. June 20, 1946. p. 16. Lock-green.svg
  3. "Mixed Reception For Frank Selke's Scheme". Winnipeg Tribune. Winnipeg, Manitoba. December 11, 1946. p. 27. Lock-green.svg
  4. Moore, Mike (May 12, 2010). "Myth of the Montreal Canadiens' Early Success". The Hockey Writers. Retrieved November 30, 2020.
  5. "McKenzie Leaves NHL". Montreal Gazette. June 13, 1963. p. 38.
  6. Fischler 2003, p. 172.
  7. Duplacey 1996, p. 24.
  8. Hockey's Book of Firsts, p.66, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN   978-1-57215-037-9
  9. Hockey's Book of Firsts, p.25, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN   978-1-57215-037-9
  10. "Standings: 1946–1947". National Hockey League. Retrieved November 30, 2019.
  11. Dinger 2011, p. 148.