1949–50 NHL season

Last updated
1949–50 NHL season
League National Hockey League
Sport Ice hockey
DurationOctober 12, 1949 – April 23, 1950
Number of games70
Number of teams6
Regular season
Season champion Detroit Red Wings
Season MVP Charlie Rayner (Rangers)
Top scorer Ted Lindsay (Red Wings)
Stanley Cup
Champions Detroit Red Wings
  Runners-up New York Rangers
NHL seasons

The 1949–50 NHL season was the 33rd season of the National Hockey League. The Detroit Red Wings defeated the New York Rangers in seven games for the Stanley Cup. It was the Red Wings' fourth championship.

Contents

League business

The NHL decided to increase the number of games played from 60 to 70 games for each team. Each team played every other team 14 times. Goaltenders would no longer have to face a penalty shot if they took a major penalty. A team-mate could serve the penalty in the penalty box. [1]

In June 1949, the NHL decided to henceforth paint the ice surface white. This was done by adding white paint to the water before freezing. Previously, the ice surface was just frozen water on concrete, which made a dull grey colour. By "whitening" the ice surface, it made seeing and following the puck much easier, especially on the relatively new medium of television.

Regular season

Detroit, led by the new Production Line of Lindsay, Abel and Howe won the regular season. The Production line led the league in scoring 1–2–3.

Highlights

On November 2, 1949, at Chicago Stadium, a rather serious brawl broke out in a game Chicago defeated Montreal 4–1. During the second period, some rinkside fans began to get on Montreal defenceman Ken Reardon, and when one fan grabbed his sweater, Reardon swung his stick and hit one of the rowdies. Leo Gravelle and Billy Reay joined in, and yet another fan climbed over the boards and challenged Reardon, but was forced back to his seat. When the game ended, police arrested Reardon, Reay and Gravelle. Later, the players were cleared when a judge ruled that the fans were the aggressors and overstepped the prerogatives as fans.

After Chicago defeated Toronto 6–3 on November 27, Conn Smythe told goaltender Turk Broda, "I'm not running a fat man's team!" and said that Broda would not play until he reduced his weight to 190 lb. At the time, Broda weighed almost 200. Al Rollins was purchased from Cleveland of the AHL and Gil Mayer was brought up for good measure. When he reached 189 pounds, Broda went back into the Toronto net and he gained his fourth shutout of the season December 3 and Maple Leaf fans cheered all of his 22 saves.

After the Red Wings clobbered Chicago 9–2 on February 8, writer Lew Walter tried to interview Chicago coach Charlie Conacher. Conacher exploded in anger, criticized Walter's past stories and punched Walter, knocking him down to the floor. Walter announced that he would seek a warrant for Conacher's arrest. NHL president Clarence Campbell took a dim view of Conacher's actions and fined him $200. Conacher then phoned Walter and apologized, saying he regretted what had taken place.

Montreal fans began to boo Bill Durnan, like they had in 1947–48, despite the fact he was the league's best goalkeeper, and in an interview, he stated he was going to retire at the end of the season. In reality, Durnan had been cut a number of times during the season, and at one point, had to take penicillin. It caused a high fever and he missed some action. Despite this, he recorded eight shutouts and won the Vezina Trophy for the sixth time in his seven-year career.

Ken Reardon got himself into trouble when he made a statement to a magazine suggesting retribution to Cal Gardner, stating: "I'm going to make sure that Gardner gets 14 stitches in his mouth. I may have to wait a long time, but I'll get even." On March 1, 1950, Clarence Campbell made Reardon post a $1,000 bond to make sure he did not carry out his threat. When the season ended, Reardon was refunded the $1,000, since he did not hurt Gardner as he said he would.

Final standings

National Hockey League [2]
GPWLTGFGADIFFPts
1 Detroit Red Wings 70371914229164+6588
2 Montreal Canadiens 70292219172150+2277
3 Toronto Maple Leafs 70312712176173+374
4 New York Rangers 70283111170189−1967
5 Boston Bruins 70223216198228−3060
6 Chicago Black Hawks 70223810203244−4154

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
      
1Detroit4
3 Toronto 3
1Detroit4
4 New York 3
2 Montreal 1
4New York4

Semifinals

Detroit defeated Toronto in seven games to advance to the Finals; while New York defeated Montreal in five games to also advance to the Finals.

(1) Detroit Red Wings vs. (3) Toronto Maple Leafs

March 28Toronto Maple Leafs5–0Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
Joe Klukay (1) – 00:10
Bill Barilko (1) – pp – 08:49
John McCormack (1) – sh – 11:29
Second periodNo scoring
Cal Gardner (1) – 03:29
Joe Klukay (2) – 11:17
Third periodNo scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Harry Lumley
March 30Toronto Maple Leafs1–3Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoringFirst period09:13 – ppRed Kelly (1)
15:47 – Sid Abel (1)
No scoringSecond period10:32 – Joe Carveth (1)
Fleming MacKell (1) – 05:44Third periodNo scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Harry Lumley
April 1Detroit Red Wings0–2Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond period06:44 – Joe Klukay (3)
19:40 – Max Bentley (1)
No scoringThird periodNo scoring
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 4Detroit Red Wings2–12OTToronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Marty Pavelich (1) – 10:50First period03:34 – Max Bentley (2)
No scoringSecond periodNo scoring
No scoringThird periodNo scoring
Leo Reise (1) – pp – 00:38Second overtime periodNo scoring
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 6Toronto Maple Leafs2–0Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Ted Kennedy (1) – pp – 10:35First periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond periodNo scoring
Max Bentley (3) – 08:37Third periodNo scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Harry Lumley
April 8Detroit Red Wings4–0Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Marty Pavelich (2) – pp – 06:55
George Gee (1) – 19:40
First periodNo scoring
Gerry Couture (1) – pp – 10:31Second periodNo scoring
Jack Stewart (1) – 05:03Third periodNo scoring
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 9Toronto Maple Leafs0–1OTDetroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond periodNo scoring
No scoringThird periodNo scoring
No scoringFirst overtime period08:39 – Leo Reise (2)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Harry Lumley
Detroit won series 4–3

(2) Montreal Canadiens vs. (4) New York Rangers

March 29Montreal Canadiens1–3New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
Norm Dussault (1) – pp – 08:27First period14:40 – ppDon Raleigh (1)
No scoringSecond period11:18 – ppNick Mickoski (1)
No scoringThird period19:38 – Pat Egan (1)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Chuck Rayner
April 1New York Rangers3–2Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Pentti Lund (1) – 10:10First period06:57 – Floyd Curry (1)
09:48 – Norm Dussault (2)
No scoringSecond periodNo scoring
Buddy O'Connor (1) – pp – 11:58
Ed Slowinski (1) – 13:34
Third periodNo scoring
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 2Montreal Canadiens1–4New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
Bert Hirschfeld (1) – 08:30First period07:12 – Pentti Lund (2)
15:58 – ppEd Slowinski (2)
No scoringSecond period14:20 – Pentti Lund (3)
No scoringThird period02:16 – pp – Pentti Lund
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Chuck Rayner
April 4New York Rangers2–3OTMontreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Pentti Lund (5) – 09:14First period17:15 – ppNorm Dussault (3)
Don Raleigh (2) – 09:07Second periodNo scoring
No scoringThird period09:34 – ppMaurice Richard (1)
No scoringFirst overtime period15:19 – Elmer Lach (1)
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 6New York Rangers3–0Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond periodNo scoring
Jack Gordon (1) – 04:22
Pat Egan (2) – 05:18
Dunc Fisher (1) – 16:47
Third periodNo scoring
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Bill Durnan
New York won series 4–1

Stanley Cup Finals

Two games were played in Toronto, with the rest in Detroit, as the circus had taken over Madison Square Garden in New York.

April 11New York Rangers1–4Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Buddy O'Connor (2) – 05:58First periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond period04:43 – ppJoe Carveth (2)
09:32 – George Gee (2)
10:06 – Jim McFadden (1)
13:56 – ppGerry Couture (2)
No scoringThird periodNo scoring
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Harry Lumley
April 13Detroit Red Wings1–3New York Rangers Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
Gerry Couture (3) – 03:05Second period10:39 – Pat Egan (3)
No scoringThird period03:04 – Edgar Laprade (1)
11:20 – Edgar Laprade (2)
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Chuck Rayner
April 15Detroit Red Wings4–0New York Rangers Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Gerry Couture (4) – pp – 14:14
George Gee (3) – pp – 19:08
First periodNo scoring
Sid Abel (2) – 19:16Second periodNo scoring
Marty Pavelich (3) – 16:55Third periodNo scoring
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Chuck Rayner
April 18New York Rangers4–3OTDetroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoringFirst period06:31 – Ted Lindsay (1)
16:48 – Sid Abel (3)
Buddy O'Connor (3) – 19:59Second periodNo scoring
Marty Pavelich (4) – 03:32Third period08:09 – Edgar Laprade (3)
16:26 – Gus Kyle (1)
Don Raleigh (3) – 08:34First overtime periodNo scoring
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Harry Lumley
April 20New York Rangers2–1OTDetroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoringFirst periodNo scoring
Dunc Fisher (2) – 07:44Second periodNo scoring
No scoringThird period18:10 – Ted Lindsay (2)
Don Raleigh (4) – 01:38First overtime periodNo scoring
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Harry Lumley
April 22New York Rangers4–5Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Allan Stanley (1) – 03:45
Dunc Fisher (3) – 07:35
First period19:18 – Ted Lindsay (3)
Pentti Lund (6) – pp – 03:18Second period05:38 – Sid Abel (4)
16:07 – Gerry Couture (5)
Tony Leswick (1) – 01:54Third period04:13 – Ted Lindsay (4)
10:34 – Sid Abel (5)
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Harry Lumley
April 23New York Rangers3–42OTDetroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Allan Stanley (2) – pp – 11:14
Tony Leswick (2) – pp – 12:18
First periodNo scoring
Buddy O'Connor (4) – 11:42Second period05:09 – ppPete Babando (1)
05:30 – ppSid Abel (6)
15:57 – Jim McFadden (2)
No scoringThird periodNo scoring
No scoringSecond overtime period08:31 – Pete Babando (2)
Chuck Rayner Goalie stats Harry Lumley
Detroit won series 4–3

Awards

This was the last season that the O'Brien Cup was awarded to the Stanley Cup runner up – in this season, the New York Rangers – as it went into retirement for the second and final time at season's end. (It was not awarded between 1917 and 1921)

O'Brien Cup:
(Stanley Cup runner-up)
New York Rangers
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Top record, regular season)
Detroit Red Wings
Art Ross Trophy:
(Top scorer)
Ted Lindsay, Detroit Red Wings
Calder Memorial Trophy:
(Top first year player)
Jack Gelineau, Boston Bruins
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Charlie Rayner, New York Rangers
Lady Byng Memorial Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Edgar Laprade, New York Rangers
Vezina Trophy:
(Goaltender of team with best goals against average)
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens

All-Star teams

First Team  Position  Second Team
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens G Chuck Rayner, New York Rangers
Gus Mortson, Toronto Maple Leafs D Leo Reise, Detroit Red Wings
Ken Reardon, Montreal Canadiens D Red Kelly, Detroit Red Wings
Sid Abel, Detroit Red Wings C Ted Kennedy, Toronto Maple Leafs
Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens RW Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings
Ted Lindsay, Detroit Red Wings LW Tony Leswick, New York Rangers

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

PLAYERTEAMGPGAPTSPIM
Ted Lindsay Detroit Red Wings69235578141
Sid Abel Detroit Red Wings6934356946
Gordie Howe Detroit Red Wings7035336869
Maurice Richard Montreal Canadiens70432265114
Paul Ronty Boston Bruins702336598
Roy Conacher Chicago Black Hawks7025315616
Doug Bentley Chicago Black Hawks6420335328
Johnny Peirson Boston Bruins5727255249
Metro Prystai Chicago Black Hawks6529225131
Bep Guidolin Chicago Black Hawks7017345142

Source: NHL [3]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Mins – Minutes Played; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts

PlayerTeamGPMinsGAGAAWLTSO
Bill Durnan Montreal Canadiens6438401412.202621178
Harry Lumley Detroit Red Wings6337801482.353316147
Turk Broda Toronto Maple Leafs6840401672.483025129
Chuck Rayner New York Rangers6941401812.622830116
Jack Gelineau Boston Bruins6740202203.282230153
Frank Brimsek Chicago Black Hawks7042002443.492238105

Coaches

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1949–50 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1949–50 (listed with their last team):

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

Notes