1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final

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For more detail & team line-outs see separate entry for 1950 Senior Camogie Championship.
1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Final
Event All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1950
Date26 March 1951
City Mitcham, London
Attendance1,300
1949
1951

The 1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final was the nineteenth All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, an inter-county camogie tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Ireland Island in north-west Europe, 20th largest in world, politically divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the UK)

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

Dublin had beaten Antrim 6-5 to 4-1 in the "Home" final, and went to London for the All-Ireland final on Easter Monday 1951. They led 4-2 to 0-0 at half-time and won easily. P. Cooney scored three goals. This is the last All-Ireland final to date not to be held at Croke Park. [1]

Easter Monday day after Easter Sunday

Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is a holiday in some countries. Easter Monday in the Western Christian liturgical calendar is the second day of Eastertide and analogously in the Byzantine Rite is the second day of Bright Week.

Croke Park stadium in Dublin, Ireland

Croke Park is a Gaelic Athletic Association stadium located in Dublin, Ireland. Named in honour of Archbishop Thomas Croke, it is often called Croker by some GAA fans and locals. It serves both as the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA).

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Antrim GAA

The Antrim County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association or Antrim GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Antrim. The county board is also responsible for the Antrim inter-county teams.

Armagh GAA

The Armagh County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Armagh GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Armagh. The county board is also responsible for the Armagh inter-county teams.

Derry GAA

The Derry County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Derry GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland. It is responsible for gaelic games in County Londonderry in Northern Ireland. The county board is also responsible for the Derry inter-county teams.

Tipperary GAA Gaelic Athletic Association

The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Tipperary and the Tipperary inter-county teams.

Offaly GAA County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Offaly

The Offaly County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Offaly GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Offaly. Separate county boards are also responsible for the Offaly inter-county teams.

Limerick GAA

The Limerick County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Limerick GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Limerick. The county board is also responsible for the Limerick inter-county teams.

Tyrone GAA county board of the Gaelic Athletic Association

The Tyrone County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), or Tyrone GAA, is one of the 32 county boards of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Ireland. It is responsible for Gaelic games in County Tyrone and for Tyrone inter-county teams.

Wexford GAA

The Wexford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Wexford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Wexford. The county board is also responsible for the Wexford inter-county teams.

Wicklow GAA

The Wicklow County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Wicklow GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Wicklow. The county board is also responsible for the Wicklow inter-county teams.

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

The All-Ireland Intermediate Camogie Championship is the most important competition in the women’s field sport of camogie for second-tier county teams and for second-string teams of first-tier counties. If the winning team comes from a second-tier county, that county is promoted to the following year's senior championship. Similarly, the winner of the All-Ireland junior championship is promoted to the following year's Intermediate Championship. The grade mirrors Division 2 of the National Camogie League. The final is played in Croke Park Dublin alongside the Senior and Junior finals. The competition is contested by Antrim, Kildare, Down, Meath, Waterford and the second teams of Cork, Galway, Kilkenny, Tipperary and Wexford.

The 1934 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final was the 3rd All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1934 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, an inter-county camogie tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

The 1936 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final was the fifth All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1936 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, an inter-county camogie tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

The 1951 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final was the twentieth All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1951 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, an inter-county camogie tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

The 1964 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final was the 33rd All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1964 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, an inter-county camogie tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

The 1999 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final was the 68th All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 1999 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, an inter-county camogie tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

The 2010 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final was the 79th All-Ireland Final and the deciding match of the 2010 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, an inter-county camogie tournament for the top teams in Ireland.

The 1935 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1935 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Dublin by a single point margin in the final.

The 1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1950 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated London by a 21-point margin in the final, having already defeated Antrim by a ten-point margin in the home final.

The 2012 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship in association with RTÉ Sport for sponsorship reasons— is the premier competition of the 2012 camogie season. It commenced on 23 June 2012 and ended with the final on 16 September. Eight county teams compete in the Senior Championship out of twenty-seven who compete overall in the Senior, Intermediate and Junior Championships. Wexford defeated Cork in the final. The championship was notable for the qualification of Offaly for the All-Ireland semi-final just three years after they had been graded junior. Quarter-final stages of the championships were re-introduced for the first time since 2006. The 2012 championship was the first to be held under new rules which allowed two points for a point direct from a sideline ball.

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