1954 Asian Games

Last updated
II Asian Games
2nd Asiad.png
Host city Manila, Philippines
MottoEver Onward
Nations participating18
Athletes participating970
Events77 in 8 sports
Opening ceremonyMay 1
Closing ceremonyMay 9
Officially opened by Ramon Magsaysay
President of the Philippines
Athlete's OathMartin Gison
Judge's OathAntonio Delas Alas [1]
Torch lighterEnriquito Beech [2]
Main venue Rizal Memorial Stadium
1954 Asian Games Gold Medal Asian Games Medal 1954 - Manila.jpg
1954 Asian Games Gold Medal

The 1954 Asian Games (Filipino : Palarong Asyano 1954), officially known as the Second Asian GamesManila 1954 was a multi-sport event held in Manila, Philippines, from May 1 to 9, 1954. A total of 970 athletes from 19 Asian National Olympic Committees (NOCs) competed in 76 events from eight sports. The number of participating NOCs and athletes were larger than the previous Asian Games held in New Delhi in 1951. This edition of the games has a different twist where it did not implement a medal tally system to determine the overall champion but a pointing system. The pointing system is a complex system where each athlete were given points according to their achievement like position in athletics or in swimming. In the end the pointing system showed to be worthless as it simply ranked the nations the same way in the medal tally system. The pointing system was not implemented in future games ever since. [3] Jorge B. Vargas was the head of the Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation (In 1976, was renamed as Philippine Olympic Committee) and the Manila Asian Games Organizing Committee. With the second-place finish of the Philippines, only around 9,000 spectators attended the closing ceremony at the Rizal Memorial Stadium. [4] The events were broadcast on radio live at DZRH and DZAQ-TV ABS-3 on delayed telecast.

Contents

Opening ceremony

The Games were formally opened by President Ramon Magsaysay on May 1, 1954, at 16:02 local time. Around 20,000 spectators filled the Rizal Memorial Stadium in Malate, Manila, for the opening ceremony. As requested by the IOC, the torch relay and lighting of the cauldron were excluded from the Opening Ceremony to preserve the tradition of the Olympic Games. The torch ceremony were returned at the 1958 Asian Games. The host however gave a solution by giving a special citation to the last athlete to enter the parade. The Philippines, as host, was the last country to enter the stadium. The flag bearer for the Philippines squad was Andres Franco, who won a gold medal in the 1951 Asian Games in high jump event, the sole gold medal of any Filipino in the athletics events of the previous Asian Games. [5] [6]

Sports

Philippines location map (square).svg
Green pog.svg
Manila
Location of Manila in Philippines.

The 1954 Asian Games featured eight sports divided into 10 events, aquatics included three events namely diving, swimming and water polo. This version of the Asian Games comprised more sports and events than the last one, as six sports and seven events were in the calendar of 1951 Asian Games. Three sports—boxing, shooting and wrestling—made their debut, while cycling was dropped out. [7]

Participating nations

Participating NOCs. 1954 Asian Games participating countries.png
Participating NOCs.

National Olympic Committees (NOCs) are named and arranged according to their official IOC country codes and designations at the time.

Participating National Olympic Committees
Non-participating National Olympic Committees

Only one country just sent officials.

Calendar

In the following calendar for the 1954 Asian Games, each blue box represents an event competition, such as a qualification round, on that day. The yellow boxes represent days during which medal-awarding finals for a sport were held. The numeral indicates the number of event finals for each sport held that day. On the left, the calendar lists each sport with events held during the Games, and at the right, how many gold medals were won in that sport. There is a key at the top of the calendar to aid the reader.

OCOpening ceremonyEvent competitions1Event finalsCCClosing ceremony
May 19541st
Sat
2nd
Sun
3rd
Mon
4th
Tue
5th
Wed
6th
Thu
7th
Fri
8th
Sat
9th
Sun
Gold
medals
CeremoniesOCCC
Athletics pictogram.svg Athletics 4591230
Basketball pictogram.svg Basketball 11
Boxing pictogram.svg Boxing 77
Diving pictogram.svg Diving 11114
Football pictogram.svg Football 11
Shooting pictogram.svg Shooting 111216
Swimming pictogram.svg Swimming 115613
Water polo pictogram.svg Water polo 11
Weightlifting pictogram.svg Weightlifting 1337
Wrestling pictogram.svg Wrestling 77
Total gold medals41310155102077
May 19541st
Sat
2nd
Sun
3rd
Mon
4th
Tue
5th
Wed
6th
Thu
7th
Fri
8th
Sat
9th
Sun
Gold
medals

Medal table

Japan led the medal table, athletes from Japan won most medals, including most gold, silver and bronze. Host nation, Philippines finished second with 45 total medals (including 14 gold). [8]

The top ten ranked NOCs at these Games are listed below. The host nation, Philippines, is highlighted.

  *   Host nation (Philippines)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan  (JPN)38362498
2Flag of the Philippines (navy blue).svg  Philippines  (PHI)*14141745
3Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).png  South Korea  (KOR)86519
4Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan  (PAK)56213
5Flag of India.svg  India  (IND)54817
6Flag of the Republic of China.svg  Republic of China  (ROC)24713
7Flag of Israel.svg  Israel  (ISR)2114
8Flag of Burma (1948-1974).svg  Burma  (BIR)2024
9Flag of Singapore (1946-1959).svg  Singapore  (SIN)1449
10Flag of Ceylon (1951-1972).svg  Ceylon  (CEY)0112
11–13 Remaining 0145
Totals (13 nations)777775229

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References

  1. Not formally named as Judge's Oath, it was a tradition then when an officiating representative (Judge) of the host nation formally approach the Head of State to read a statement from the Sport Officers and to request the Head of State to formally open the games.
  2. As requested by the IOC, the torch relay and lighting of the cauldron were excluded from the Opening Ceremony to preserve the tradition of the Olympic Games. The torch ceremony were returned at the 1958 Asian Games. The host however gave a solution by giving a special citation to the last athlete to enter the parade. The Philippines, as host, was the last country to enter the stadium.
  3. Manila Times May 9, 1954
  4. Manila Times May 10, 1954
  5. Manila Times May 2, 1954
  6. "Asian Games Men High jump". gbrathletics.com. Athletics Weekly. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved July 11, 2011.
  7. "Report of the First Asian Games held at New Delhi" (PDF). la84foundation.org. LA84 Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 July 2011. Retrieved July 11, 2011.
  8. "Overall medal standings Manila 1954". ocasia.org. Olympic Council of Asia. Archived from the original on 2012-03-08. Retrieved July 11, 2011.
Preceded by
New Delhi
Asian Games
Manila

II Asiad (1954)
Succeeded by
Tokyo