1962 Detroit Tigers season

Last updated

1962 Detroit Tigers
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) John Fetzer
General manager(s) Rick Ferrell
Manager(s) Bob Scheffing
Local television WJBK
Local radio WKMH
(George Kell, Ernie Harwell)
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The 1962 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished tied for third place in the American League with a record of 85–76, 10½ games behind the New York Yankees.

Detroit Tigers Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Detroit, Michigan, United States of America

The Detroit Tigers are an American professional baseball team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the American League (AL) Central division. One of the AL's eight charter franchises, the club was founded in Detroit as a member of the minor league Western League in 1894. They are the oldest continuous one name, one city franchise in the AL. The Tigers have won four World Series championships, 11 AL pennants, and four AL Central division championships. The Tigers also won division titles in 1972, 1984, and 1987 as a member of the AL East. The team currently plays its home games at Comerica Park in Downtown Detroit.

Baseball Sport

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

Contents

Offseason

Gerry Staley American baseball player

Gerald Lee Staley was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. He was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1942 Minor League draft. He pitched regularly from 1947 on, then was traded to Cincinnati for the 1955 season. In 1955 and 1956, he pitched for three teams, including the Yankees, before ending up with the Chicago White Sox, for whom he would help deliver the 1959 American League pennant as a reliever.

Frank House (baseball) American baseball player

Henry Franklin House, nicknamed "Pig", was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Athletics (1958–59) and Cincinnati Reds (1961). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

Arlo Adolph Brunsberg is an American former professional baseball player. He played two games in Major League Baseball for the Detroit Tigers in 1966 as a catcher.

Regular season

Season standings

American League WLPct.GB
New York Yankees 9666.593--
Minnesota Twins 9171.5625
Los Angeles Angels 8576.53110
Detroit Tigers 8576.52810.5
Chicago White Sox 8577.52511
Cleveland Indians 8082.49416
Baltimore Orioles 7785.47519
Boston Red Sox 7684.47519
Kansas City Athletics 7290.44424
Washington Senators 60101.37335.5

Record vs. opponents

1962 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBALBOSCWSCLEDETKCLAAMINNYYWSH
Baltimore 8–109–911–72–1610–88–106–1211–712–6
Boston 10–88–107–1111–610–86–1210–86–128–9
Chicago 9–910–812–69–99–910–88–108–1010–8
Cleveland 7–1111–76–1210–811–79–96–1211–79–9
Detroit 16–26–119–98–1012–611–75–137–1111–7
Kansas City 8–108–109–97–116–126–128–105–1315–3
Los Angeles 10–812–68–109–97–1112–69–98–1011–7
Minnesota 12–68–1010–812–613–510–89–97–1110–8–1
New York 7–1112–610–87–1111–713–510–811–715–3
Washington 6–129–88–109–97–113–157–118–10–13–15

Notable transactions

Pittsburgh Pirates Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

The Pittsburgh Pirates are an American professional baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pirates compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. The Pirates play their home games at PNC Park; the team previously played at Forbes Field and Three Rivers Stadium, the latter of which was named after its location near the confluence of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers. Founded on October 15, 1881 as Allegheny, the franchise has won five World Series championships. The Pirates are also often referred to as the "Bucs" or the "Buccos".

Coot Veal American baseball player

Orville Inman "Coot" Veal is an American former professional baseball shortstop. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers before the 1952 season and played six seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He was selected by the Washington Senators from the Tigers in the 1960 American League expansion draft. He played for the Tigers, Senators (1961) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1962).

Roster

1962 Detroit Tigers
Roster
Pitchers
Hank Aguirre American baseball player and coach

Henry John Aguirre, commonly known as Hank Aguirre, was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher who played with the Cleveland Indians (1955–57), Detroit Tigers (1958–67), Los Angeles Dodgers (1968), and Chicago Cubs (1969–70). He went on to become a successful businessman in Detroit, Michigan. His last name was typically pronounced "ah-GEAR-ee."

Jim Bunning American baseball player and politician

James Paul David Bunning was an American professional baseball pitcher and politician who represented Kentucky in both chambers of the United States Congress. He is the sole Major League Baseball athlete to have been elected to both the United States Senate and the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Jerry Casale American baseball player

Jerry Joseph Casale was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for three different teams between 1958 and 1962. Listed at 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m), 200 lb., he batted and threw right-handed.

Catchers

Infielders

Reno Bertoia Italian baseball infielder

Reno Peter Bertoia was Italian Canadian professional baseball player.

Steve Boros American baseball player and coach

Stephen Boros, Jr. was an American baseball infielder, coach, manager, scout, and administrator. Best known for his scientific approach to the sport and his use of computers, Boros' baseball career spanned almost 50 years from his debut as a player for the University of Michigan in 1956 to his retirement in 2004 as an executive with the Detroit Tigers.

Don Buddin Major League Baseball player

Donald Thomas Buddin was an American professional baseball shortstop. He played all or part of six seasons in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox, Houston Colt .45s (1962) and Detroit Tigers (1962). Listed at 5' 11", 178 lb. (81 kg), Buddin batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Turbeville, South Carolina.

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
1B Norm Cash 507123.2433989
SS Chico Fernández 141503125.2492059

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Hank Aguirre 422161682.21156
Howie Koplitz 1037.2305.2610

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGWLSVERASO

Farm system

LevelTeamLeagueManager
AAA Denver Bears American Association Frank Skaff
A Knoxville Smokies Sally League Frank Carswell
C Duluth–Superior Dukes Northern League Al Lakeman
D Montgomery Rebels Alabama–Florida League Johnny Groth
D Thomasville Tigers Georgia–Florida League Gail Henley
D Jamestown Tigers New York–Penn League Stubby Overmire

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Thomasville

See also

Notes

  1. Jerry Staley at Baseball Reference
  2. Frank House at Baseball Reference
  3. Arlo Brunsberg at Baseball Reference
  4. Conrad Cardinal at Baseball Reference
  5. Coot Veal at Baseball Reference

Related Research Articles

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References