1964 Cincinnati Bearcats football team

Last updated
1964 Cincinnati Bearcats football
MVC champion
Conference Missouri Valley Conference
1964 record8–2 (3–0 MVC)
Head coach
Captain Brig Owens, Jerry Momper
Home stadium Nippert Stadium
Seasons
  1963
1965  
1964 Missouri Valley Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Cincinnati $300  820
Tulsa 310  920
Wichita State 220  460
North Texas State 130  271
Louisville 030  190
  • $ Conference champion

The 1964 Cincinnati Bearcats football team represented the University of Cincinnati in the Missouri Valley Conference (MVC) during the 1964 NCAA University Division football season. In their fourth season under head coach Chuck Studley, the Bearcats compiled an 8–2 record (3–0 against conference opponents), won the MVC championship, and outscored opponents by a total of 211 to 99. [1] [2]

The team's statistical leaders included team captain Brig Owens with 790 passing yards, Al Nelson with 973 rushing yards and 78 points scored, and Errol Prisby with 367 receiving yards. [3] Nelson broke the Cincinnati single-season rushing record of 959 yards set by Roger Stephens in 1947. [4]

Schedule

DateOpponentSiteResultAttendanceSource
September 26 Dayton *W 20–1023,000 [5]
October 2at Detroit *W 19–016,539 [6]
October 10 Xavier *
  • Nippert Stadium
  • Cincinnati, OH
W 35–625,000 [7]
October 17at Boston College *L 10–015,000 [8] [9]
October 24 Tulsa
  • Nippert Stadium
  • Cincinnati, OH
W 28–2316,500 [10]
October 31 George Washington *
  • Nippert Stadium
  • Cincinnati, OH
L 17–1520,000 [11]
November 7at North Texas State W 27–615,000 [12]
November 14at Wichita State W 19–79,278 [13]
November 21 Miami (OH) *
  • Nippert Stadium
  • Cincinnati, OH (rivalry)
W 28–1417,000 [14]
November 28at Houston *W 20–610,000 [4]
  • *Non-conference game

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The 1964 George Washington Colonials football team was an American football team that represented George Washington University as part of the Southern Conference during the 1964 NCAA University Division football season. In its fourth season under head coach Jim Camp, the team compiled a 5–4 record.

References

  1. "2009 Cincinnati Football Media Guide Online" (PDF). University of Cincinnati. p. 186. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  2. "1964 Cincinnati Bearcats Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LC. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  3. "1964 Cincinnati Bearcats Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LC. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  4. 1 2 Dick Forbes (November 29, 1964). "Bearcats Bag Cougars, 20-6, Wind Up 8-2". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. 1D via Newspapers.com.
  5. Bill Ford (September 27, 1964). "Debuting UC Grabs 20-10 Win Over Dayton". The Cincinnati Enquirer . p. 1D via Newspapers.com.
  6. Bob Pille (October 3, 1964). "Titans Lose, 19-0". The Detroit Daily Press. p. 7 via Newspapers.com.
  7. Bill Anzer (October 11, 1964). "Speedy 'Cats Dust Off Muskies, 35-6". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. 1 via Newspapers.com.
  8. Bill Anzer (October 18, 1964). "Boston College Blanks Bearcats In Rain, 10-0". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. 1H via Newspapers.com.
  9. "Boston College Wins". Chicago Tribune. October 18, 1964. p. II-4 via Newspapers.com.(attendance 15,000)
  10. Dick Forbes (October 25, 1964). "'Cats Blow Harder Than Hurricane, 28-23: Tulsa On 'Two' As Gun Sounds". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. 1E via Newspapers.com.
  11. Dick Forbes (November 1, 1964). "Field Goal Beats UC In Last Minute, 17-15". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. 1E via Newspapers.com.
  12. "UC 'Double Times' North Texas, 27-6, Takes MVC Lead". The Cincinnati Enquirer. November 8, 1964. p. 1D via Newspapers.com.
  13. "Bearcats Clinch MVC Title: 19-7 Win Over Wichita Does It". The Cincinnati Enquirer. November 15, 1964. p. 1E via Newspapers.com.
  14. Bill Ford (November 22, 1964). "UC Heads Redskins Off At The Pass, 28-14". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. 1E via Newspapers.com.