1964 FA Cup Final

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1964 FA Cup Final
Old Wembley Stadium (external view).jpg
Event 1963–64 FA Cup
Date2 May 1964 [1]
Venue Wembley Stadium, London
Referee Arthur Holland (Barnsley)
Attendance90,000
1963
1965

The 1964 FA Cup Final was the 83rd final of the FA Cup. It took place on 2 May 1964 at Wembley Stadium and was contested between West Ham United and Preston North End.

Contents

West Ham, captained by Bobby Moore and managed by Ron Greenwood, won the match 3–2 to win the FA Cup for the first time. Second Division Preston led twice through Doug Holden and Alex Dawson respectively, with John Sissons and Geoff Hurst equalising for West Ham. Ronnie Boyce then scored the winner for the London club in the 90th minute.

Preston's Howard Kendall became the youngest player to play in a Wembley FA Cup Final, aged 17 years and 345 days. [2] He retained this record until 1980, when Paul Allen played in that year's final for West Ham at the age of 17 years and 256 days. [3]

Ronnie Boyce, scorer of West Ham's winning goal, in 2015. Ronnie Boyce at Upton Park 02 May 2015.jpg
Ronnie Boyce, scorer of West Ham's winning goal, in 2015.

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Road to Wembley

Preston North End

Round 3: Nottingham Forest 0–0 Preston North End

Replay: Preston North End 1–0 Nottingham Forest

Round 4: Bolton Wanderers 2–2 Preston North End

Replay: Preston North End 2–1 Bolton Wanderers

Round 5: Preston North End 1–0 Carlisle United

Round 6: Oxford United 1–2 Preston North End

Semi-final: Preston North End 2–1 Swansea Town

(at Villa Park) [4]

West Ham United

Round 3: West Ham United 3–0 Charlton Athletic [5]

Round 4: Leyton Orient 1–1 West Ham United [6]

Round 4 Replay: West Ham United 3–0 Leyton Orient [7]

Round 5: Swindon 1–3 West Ham United [8]

Round 6: West Ham United 3–1 Burnley [9]

Semi-final: West Ham United 3–1 Manchester United

(at Hillsborough) [10]

Match details

Preston North End 2–3 West Ham United
Holden Soccerball shade.svg 10'
Dawson Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Sissons Soccerball shade.svg 11'
Hurst Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Boyce Soccerball shade.svg 90'
Wembley Stadium, London
Attendance: 100,000
Referee: Arthur Holland
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks hoops white.png
Kit socks long.svg
Preston North End
Kit left arm claretborder.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body thinskycollar.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm claretborder.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
West Ham United
GK1 Flag of Ireland.svg Alan Kelly
RB2 Flag of Scotland.svg George Ross
LB3 Flag of Scotland.svg Jim Smith
RH4 Flag of England.svg Nobby Lawton (c)
CH5 Flag of England.svg Tony Singleton
LH6 Flag of England.svg Howard Kendall
OR7 Flag of England.svg Dave Wilson
IR8 Flag of England.svg Alec Ashworth
CF9 Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Dawson
IL10 Flag of England.svg Alan Spavin
OL11 Flag of England.svg Doug Holden
Manager:
Flag of Scotland.svg Jimmy Milne
GK1 Flag of England.svg Jim Standen
RB2 Flag of England.svg John Bond
LB3 Flag of England.svg Jack Burkett
RH4 Flag of England.svg Eddie Bovington
CH5 Flag of England.svg Ken Brown
LH6 Flag of England.svg Bobby Moore (c)
OR7 Flag of England.svg Peter Brabrook
IR8 Flag of England.svg Ronnie Boyce
CF9 Flag of England.svg Johnny Byrne
IL10 Flag of England.svg Geoff Hurst
OL11 Flag of England.svg John Sissons
Manager:
Flag of England.svg Ron Greenwood

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References

  1. "English FA Cup 1963–1964 : Final". Statto. Archived from the original on 2 March 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  2. Robert Galvin (2008). The Football Hall of Fame: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Footballing Legends of All Time. Anova Books. pp. 188–. ISBN   978-1-906032-46-3.
  3. Viner, Brian (29 May 2009). "Howard Kendall: 'This Everton side takes me back to the Eighties'". The Independent. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  4. "Swansea Town v Preston North End: FA Cup Semi-final (1964)". Scfheritage.wordpress.com. Archived from the original on 12 January 2015. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  5. "Game played 4 January 1964". www.westhamstats.info. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
  6. "Game played 25 January 1964". www.westhamstats.info. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
  7. "Game played 29 January 1964". www.westhamstats.info. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
  8. "Game played on 15 Feb 1964". www.westhamstats.info. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
  9. "Game played on 29 Feb 1964". www.westhamstats.info. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
  10. West Ham v Man Utd. British Pathe. Archived from the original on 12 January 2015. Retrieved 27 December 2014.