1964 Kansas City Chiefs season

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1964 Kansas City Chiefs season
Owner Lamar Hunt
Head coach Hank Stram
General manager Jack Steadman
Home field Municipal Stadium
Results
Record7–7
Division place2nd AFL Western
Playoff finishDid not qualify
AFL All-StarsQB Len Dawson
HB Abner Haynes
TE Fred Arbanas
OT Jim Tyrer
FB Mack Lee Hill
DE Bobby Bell
DT Jerry Mays
LB Walt Corey
LB E.J. Holub
DB Dave Grayson
S Johnny Robinson
S Bobby Hunt
K Tommy Brooker

The 1964 Kansas City Chiefs season was the 5th season for the Kansas City Chiefs as a professional AFL franchise; The Chiefs began the year with a 2–1 mark before dropping three consecutive games as several of the team's best players, including E.J. Holub, Fred Arbanas and Johnny Robinson, missed numerous games with injuries. Arbanas missed the final two games of the year after undergoing surgery to his left eye, in which he suffered almost total loss of vision. Running back Mack Lee Hill, who signed with the club as a rookie free agent and received a mere $300 signing bonus, muscled his way into the starting lineup and earned a spot in the AFL All-Star Game. The club rounded out the season with two consecutive wins to close the season at 7–7, finishing second in the AFL Western Conference behind the San Diego Chargers. An average of just 18,126 fans attended each home game at Municipal Stadium, prompting discussion at the AFL owners meeting about the Chiefs future in Kansas City. [1]

Contents

Schedule

WeekDateOpponentResultRecordVenueAttendanceRecap
1September 13at Buffalo Bills L 17–340–1 War Memorial Stadium 30,157 Recap
2 Bye
3September 27at Oakland Raiders W 21–91–1 Frank Youell Field 18,163 Recap
4October 4 Houston Oilers W 28–72–1 Municipal Stadium 22,727 Recap
5October 11at Denver Broncos L 27–332–2 Bears Stadium 16,285 Recap
6October 18 Buffalo Bills L 22–352–3Municipal Stadium20,904 Recap
7October 23at Boston Patriots L 7–242–4 Fenway Park 27,400 Recap
8November 1 Denver Broncos W 49–393–4Municipal Stadium15,053 Recap
9November 8 Oakland Raiders W 42–74–4Municipal Stadium21,023 Recap
10November 15 San Diego Chargers L 14–284–5Municipal Stadium19,792 Recap
11November 22at Houston Oilers W 28–195–5 Jeppesen Stadium 17,782 Recap
12November 29at New York Jets L 14–275–6 Shea Stadium 38,135 Recap
13December 6 Boston Patriots L 24–315–7Municipal Stadium13,166 Recap
14December 13at San Diego Chargers W 49–66–7 Balboa Stadium 26,562 Recap
15December 20 New York Jets W 24–77–7Municipal Stadium14,316 Recap

Note: Intra-division opponents are in bold text.

Standings

AFL Western Division
WLTPCTDIVPFPASTK
San Diego Chargers 851.6154–2341300L2
Kansas City Chiefs 770.5004–2366306W2
Oakland Raiders 572.4172–3–1303350W2
Denver Broncos 2111.1541–4–1240438L2

Note: Tie games were not officially counted in the standings until 1972.

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References

  1. "Kansas City Chiefs History 1960's". Archived from the original on October 18, 2004. Retrieved July 30, 2007.