1966–67 FA Cup

Last updated
1966–67 FA Cup
CountryFlag of England.svg  England
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Defending champions Everton
Champions Tottenham Hotspur
(5th title)
Runners-up Chelsea
1967–68

The 1966–67 FA Cup was the 86th season of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. Tottenham Hotspur won the competition for the fifth time, beating Chelsea 2–1 in the first all-London final. The game was played at Wembley.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Single-elimination tournament knock-out sports competition

A single-elimination, knockout, or sudden death tournament is a type of elimination tournament where the loser of each match-up is immediately eliminated from the tournament. Each winner will play another in the next round, until the final match-up, whose winner becomes the tournament champion. Each match-up may be a single match or several, for example two-legged ties in European football or best-of series in American pro sports. Defeated competitors may play no further part after losing, or may participate in "consolation" or "classification" matches against other losers to determine the lower final rankings; for example, a third place playoff between losing semi-finalists. In a shootout poker tournament, there are more than two players competing at each table, and sometimes more than one progressing to the next round. Some competitions are held with a pure single-elimination tournament system. Others have many phases, with the last being a single-elimination final stage, often called playoffs.

FA Cup knockout competition in English association football

The FA Cup, also known officially as The Football Association Challenge Cup, is an annual knockout football competition in men's domestic English football. First played during the 1871–72 season, it is the oldest national football competition in the world. It is organised by and named after The Football Association. For sponsorship reasons, from 2015 through to 2019 it is also known as The Emirates FA Cup. A concurrent women's tournament is also held, the FA Women's Cup.

Contents

Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. Some matches, however, might be rescheduled for other days if there were clashes with games for other competitions or the weather was inclement. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

Calendar

RoundDate
First Round QualifyingSaturday 3 September 1966
Second Round QualifyingSaturday 17 September 1966
Third Round QualifyingSaturday 1 October 1966
Fourth Round QualifyingSaturday 15 October 1966
First Round ProperSaturday 26 November 1966
Second Round ProperSaturday 7 January 1967
Third Round ProperSaturday 28 January 1967
Fourth Round ProperSaturday 18 February 1967
Fifth Round ProperSaturday 11 March 1967
Sixth Round ProperSaturday 8 April 1967
Semi-FinalsSaturday 29 April 1967
FinalSaturday 20 May 1967

Results

First Round Proper

At this stage clubs from the Football League Third and Fourth Divisions joined those non-league clubs having come through the qualifying rounds. Matches were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 26 November 1966. Ten were drawn and went to replays two, three or four days later. Of these, four required second replays, and two third replays.

The Football League Third Division was the third tier of the English football league system in 1920–21 and again from 1958 until 1992. With the formation of the FA Premier League the division become the fourth tier. In 2004 following the formation of the Football League Championship, the division league was renamed Football League Two.

The Fourth Division of the Football League was the fourth-highest division in the English football league system from the 1958–59 season until the creation of the Premier League prior to the 1992–93 season. Whilst the division disappeared in name in 1992, the 4th tier of English football continued as the Football League Third Division, and later became known as Football League Two.

Non-League football describes football leagues played outside the top leagues of a country. Usually it describes leagues which are not fully professional. The term is primarily used for football in England, where it describes football played at a level below that of the Premier League and the three divisions of the English Football League. The term non-League was commonly used well before 1992 when the top football clubs in England all belonged to The Football League ; all clubs who were not a part of The Football League were therefore 'non-League' clubs. The term can be confusing as the vast majority of non-league football clubs in England play in a type of league. Currently, a non-League team would be any club playing in the National League and below and therefore would not play in the EFL Cup.

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamDate
1 Enfield 6–0 Chesham United 26 November 1966
2 Ashford Town 4–1 Cambridge City 26 November 1966
3 Chester 2–5 Middlesbrough 26 November 1966
4 Darlington 0–0 Stockport County 26 November 1966
Replay Stockport County 1–1 Darlington 29 November 1966
Replay Darlington 4–2 Stockport County 5 December 1966
5 Horsham 0–3 Swindon Town 26 November 1966
6 Bournemouth 3–0 Welton Rovers 26 November 1966
7 Bath City 1–0 Sutton United 26 November 1966
8 Grantham 2–1 Wimbledon 26 November 1966
9 Rochdale 1–3 Barrow 26 November 1966
10 Watford 1–0 Southend United 26 November 1966
11 Yeovil Town 1–3 Oxford United 26 November 1966
12 Walsall 2–0 St Neots Town 26 November 1966
13 Folkestone 2–2 Swansea Town 26 November 1966
Replay Swansea Town 7–2 Folkestone 29 November 1966
14 Gillingham 4–1 Tamworth 26 November 1966
15 Crewe Alexandra 1–1 Grimsby Town 26 November 1966
Replay Grimsby Town 0–1 Crewe Alexandra 30 November 1966
16 Lincoln City 3–4 Scunthorpe United 26 November 1966
17 Gainsborough Trinity 0–1 Colchester United 26 November 1966
18 Shrewsbury Town 5–2 Hartlepools United 26 November 1966
19 Wrexham 3–2 Chesterfield 26 November 1966
20 Bishop Auckland 1–1 Blyth Spartans 26 November 1966
Replay Blyth Spartans 0–0 Bishop Auckland 30 November 1966
Replay Bishop Auckland 3–3 Blyth Spartans 5 December 1966
Replay Blyth Spartans 1–4 Bishop Auckland 8 December 1966
21 Tranmere Rovers 1–1 Wigan Athletic 26 November 1966
Replay Wigan Athletic 0–1 Tranmere Rovers 28 November 1966
22 Wycombe Wanderers 1–1 Bedford Town 26 November 1966
Replay Bedford Town 3–3 Wycombe Wanderers 30 November 1966
Replay Wycombe Wanderers 1–1 Bedford Town 5 December 1966
Replay Bedford Town 3–2 Wycombe Wanderers 8 December 1966
23 Oxford City 2–2 Bristol Rovers 26 November 1966
Replay Bristol Rovers 4–0 Oxford City 29 November 1966
24 Queens Park Rangers 3–2 Poole Town 26 November 1966
25 Barnsley 3–1 Southport 26 November 1966
26 Brentford 1–0 Chelmsford City 26 November 1966
27 Bradford City 1–2 Port Vale 26 November 1966
28 Oldham Athletic 3–1 Notts County 26 November 1966
29 Bradford Park Avenue 3–2 Witton Albion 26 November 1966
30 Exeter City 1–1 Luton Town 26 November 1966
Replay Luton Town 2–0 Exeter City 1 December 1966
31 Mansfield Town 4–1 Bangor City 26 November 1966
32 Halifax Town 2–2 Doncaster Rovers 26 November 1966
Replay Doncaster Rovers 1–3 Halifax Town 29 November 1966
33 Newport County 1–2 Brighton & Hove Albion 26 November 1966
34 Wealdstone 0–2 Nuneaton Borough 26 November 1966
35 York City 0–0 Morecambe 26 November 1966
Replay Morecambe 1–1 York City 30 November 1966
Replay York City 1–0 Morecambe 8 December 1966
36 Aldershot 2–1 Torquay United 26 November 1966
37 Peterborough United 4–1 Hereford United 26 November 1966
38 South Shields 1–4 Workington 26 November 1966
39 Hendon 1–3 Reading 26 November 1966
40 Orient 2–1 Lowestoft Town 26 November 1966

Second Round Proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 7 January 1967. Five matches were drawn, with replays taking place later the same week. The Middlesbrough–York City match required a second game to settle the contest. This was the last time that the Second Round of the FA Cup was scheduled for January, rather than the typical December.

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamDate
1 Enfield 2–4 Watford 7 January 1967
2 Barrow 2–1 Tranmere Rovers 7 January 1967
3 Bath City 0–5 Brighton & Hove Albion 7 January 1967
4 Grantham 0–4 Oldham Athletic 7 January 1967
5 Walsall 3–1 Gillingham 7 January 1967
6 Crewe Alexandra 2–1 Darlington 7 January 1967
7 Middlesbrough 1–1 York City 7 January 1967
Replay York City 0–0 Middlesbrough 11 January 1967
Replay Middlesbrough 4–1 York City 16 January 1967
8 Swindon Town 5–0 Ashford Town 10 January 1967
9 Shrewsbury Town 5–1 Wrexham 7 January 1967
10 Bishop Auckland 0–0 Halifax Town 7 January 1967
Replay Halifax Town 7–0 Bishop Auckland 10 January 1967
11 Queens Park Rangers 2–0 Bournemouth 7 January 1967
12 Barnsley 1–1 Port Vale 7 January 1967
Replay Port Vale 1–3 Barnsley 16 January 1967
13 Bristol Rovers 3–2 Luton Town 7 January 1967
14 Bradford Park Avenue 3–1 Workington 11 January 1967
15 Mansfield Town 2–1 Scunthorpe United 7 January 1967
16 Aldershot 1–0 Reading 16 January 1967
17 Colchester United 0–3 Peterborough United 7 January 1967
18 Nuneaton Borough 2–0 Swansea Town 7 January 1967
19 Oxford United 1–1 Bedford Town 11 January 1967
Replay Bedford Town 1–0 Oxford United 16 January 1967
20 Orient 0–0 Brentford 7 January 1967
Replay Brentford 3–1 Orient 10 January 1967

Third Round Proper

The 44 First and Second Division clubs entered the competition at this stage. The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 28 January 1967. Eleven matches were drawn and went to replays, one of which (Hull City–Portsmouth) required a second replay.

The Football League First Division is a former division of The Football League, now known as the English Football League. Between 1888 and 1992 it was the top-level division in the English football league system. Following the creation of the FA Premier League it was a second-level division. In 2004 it was rebranded as the Football League Championship, and in 2016 adopted its current name of EFL Championship.

The Football League Second Division was the second level division in the English football league system between 1892 and 1992. Following the foundation of the FA Premier League, it became the third level division. Following the creation of the Football League Championship in 2004–05 it was re-branded as Football League One.

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamDate
1 Barrow 2–2 Southampton 28 January 1967
Replay Southampton 3–0 Barrow 1 February 1967
2 Burnley 0–0 Everton 28 January 1967
Replay Everton 2–1 Burnley 31 January 1967
3 Bury 2–0 Walsall 28 January 1967
4 Preston North End 0–1 Aston Villa 28 January 1967
5 Watford 0–0 Liverpool 28 January 1967
Replay Liverpool 3–1 Watford 1 February 1967
6 Nottingham Forest 2–1 Plymouth Argyle 28 January 1967
7 Blackburn Rovers 1–2 Carlisle United 28 January 1967
8 Sheffield Wednesday 3–0 Queens Park Rangers 28 January 1967
9 Bolton Wanderers 1–0 Crewe Alexandra 28 January 1967
10 Sunderland 5–2 Brentford 28 January 1967
11 Ipswich Town 4–1 Shrewsbury Town 28 January 1967
12 Manchester City 2–1 Leicester City 28 January 1967
13 Barnsley 1–1 Cardiff City 28 January 1967
Replay Cardiff City 2–1 Barnsley 31 January 1967
14 Bristol Rovers 0–3 Arsenal 28 January 1967
15 Northampton Town 1–3 West Bromwich Albion 28 January 1967
16 Coventry City 3–4 Newcastle United 28 January 1967
17 West Ham United 3–3 Swindon Town 28 January 1967
Replay Swindon Town 3–1 West Ham United 31 January 1967
18 Manchester United 2–0 Stoke City 28 January 1967
19 Norwich City 3–0 Derby County 28 January 1967
20 Millwall 0–0 Tottenham Hotspur 28 January 1967
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 Millwall 1 February 1967
21 Hull City 1–1 Portsmouth 28 January 1967
Replay Portsmouth 2–2 Hull City 1 February 1967
Replay Hull City 1–3 Portsmouth 6 February 1967
22 Oldham Athletic 2–2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 28 January 1967
Replay Wolverhampton Wanderers 4–1 Oldham Athletic 1 February 1967
23 Bradford Park Avenue 1–3 Fulham 28 January 1967
24 Huddersfield Town 1–2 Chelsea 28 January 1967
25 Bedford Town 2–6 Peterborough United 28 January 1967
26 Mansfield Town 2–0 Middlesbrough 28 January 1967
27 Halifax Town 1–1 Bristol City 28 January 1967
Replay Bristol City 4–1 Halifax Town 31 January 1967
28 Charlton Athletic 0–1 Sheffield United 28 January 1967
29 Leeds United 3–0 Crystal Palace 28 January 1967
30 Aldershot 0–0 Brighton & Hove Albion 28 January 1967
Replay Brighton & Hove Albion 3–1 Aldershot 1 February 1967
31 Birmingham City 2–1 Blackpool 28 January 1967
32 Nuneaton Borough 1–1 Rotherham United 28 January 1967
Replay Rotherham United 1–0 Nuneaton Borough 31 January 1967

Fourth Round Proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 18 February 1967. Six matches were drawn and went to replays. The replays were all played three or four days later, except for the Fulham–Sheffield United match which was settled on the 1 March.

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamDate
1 Bristol City 1–0 Southampton 18 February 1967
2 Liverpool 1–0 Aston Villa 18 February 1967
3 Nottingham Forest 3–0 Newcastle United 18 February 1967
4 Sheffield Wednesday 4–0 Mansfield Town 18 February 1967
5 Bolton Wanderers 0–0 Arsenal 18 February 1967
Replay Arsenal 3–0 Bolton Wanderers 22 February 1967
6 Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–1 Everton 18 February 1967
Replay Everton 3–1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 21 February 1967
7 Sunderland 7–1 Peterborough United 18 February 1967
8 Swindon Town 2–1 Bury 18 February 1967
9 Ipswich Town 2–0 Carlisle United 18 February 1967
10 Tottenham Hotspur 3–1 Portsmouth 18 February 1967
11 Fulham 1–1 Sheffield United 18 February 1967
Replay Sheffield United 3–1 Fulham 1 March 1967
12 Brighton & Hove Albion 1–1 Chelsea 18 February 1967
Replay Chelsea 4–0 Brighton & Hove Albion 22 February 1967
13 Manchester United 1–2 Norwich City 18 February 1967
14 Cardiff City 1–1 Manchester City 18 February 1967
Replay Manchester City 3–1 Cardiff City 22 February 1967
15 Leeds United 5–0 West Bromwich Albion 18 February 1967
16 Rotherham United 0–0 Birmingham City 18 February 1967
Replay Birmingham City 2–1 Rotherham United 21 February 1967

Fifth Round Proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 11 March 1967. Three games required replays three or four days later, and only one of these replays finished not in a draw. The second replays took place on 20 March.

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamDate
1 Nottingham Forest 0–0 Swindon Town 11 March 1967
Replay Swindon Town 1–1 Nottingham Forest 14 March 1967
Replay Nottingham Forest 3–0 Swindon Town 20 March 1967
2 Sunderland 1–1 Leeds United 11 March 1967
Replay Leeds United 1–1 Sunderland 15 March 1967
Replay Sunderland 1–2 Leeds United 20 March 1967
3 Everton 1–0 Liverpool 11 March 1967
4 Tottenham Hotspur 2–0 Bristol City 11 March 1967
5 Manchester City 1–1 Ipswich Town 11 March 1967
Replay Ipswich Town 0–3 Manchester City 14 March 1967
6 Norwich City 1–3 Sheffield Wednesday 11 March 1967
7 Chelsea 2–0 Sheffield United 11 March 1967
8 Birmingham City 1–0 Arsenal 11 March 1967

Sixth Round Proper

The four quarter-final ties were scheduled to be played on 8 April 1969. The Tottenham–Birmingham City game was replayed four days later following a draw.

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamDate
1 Nottingham Forest 3–2 Everton 8 April 1967
2 Chelsea 1–0 Sheffield Wednesday 8 April 1967
3 Leeds United 1–0 Manchester City 8 April 1967
4 Birmingham City 0–0 Tottenham Hotspur 8 April 1967
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 6–0 Birmingham City 12 April 1967

Semi-Finals

The semi-final matches were played on Saturday, 29 April 1967 with no replays required. Spurs and Chelsea came through the semi final round to meet at Wembley.

Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Nottingham Forest
Greaves Soccerball shade.svg 30'
Saul Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Report Hennessey Soccerball shade.svg
Hillsborough, Sheffield
Attendance: 55,000
Referee: F. Cowen, Oldham
Chelsea 1–0 Leeds United
Hateley Soccerball shade.svg 42' Report

Final

The 1967 FA Cup Final was contested by Tottenham Hotspur and Chelsea at Wembley on Saturday 20 May 1967. The match was the first ever all-London final and finished 2–1 to Spurs.

Chelsea F.C. association football club

Chelsea Football Club is a professional football club based in London, England, that competes in the Premier League, the highest tier of English football. The club has won eight League titles, eight FA Cups, five League Cups, four FA Community Shields, two UEFA Cup Winners' Cups, one UEFA Champions League, one UEFA Europa League, and one UEFA Super Cup.

Wembley Stadium (1923) former stadium in London, England which opened in 1923

The original Wembley Stadium was a football stadium in Wembley Park, London, which stood on the same site now occupied by its successor, the new Wembley Stadium. The demolition in 2003 of its famous Twin Towers upset many people worldwide. Debris from the stadium was used to make the Northala Fields in Northolt, London.

Tottenham Hotspur 2 – 1 Chelsea
Robertson Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Saul Soccerball shade.svg 67'
Tambling Soccerball shade.svg 85'
Wembley Stadium, London
Attendance: 100,000
Referee: Ken Dagnall
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Tottenham Hotspur
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts thinwhitesides.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Chelsea

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