1966 Philadelphia Phillies season

Last updated
1966 Philadelphia Phillies
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
General manager(s) John J. Quinn
Manager(s) Gene Mauch
Local television WFIL
Local radio WFIL
(By Saam, Bill Campbell, Richie Ashburn)
< Previous season       Next season >

In 1966, the Philadelphia Phillies had a winning record of 87-75. During the winning season the Phillies also beat two of their biggest rivals, the Pittsburgh Pirates and New York Mets. They had the third highest winning percentage in the national league that year. The Phillies are owned by R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr. and since 1938 the Phillies have played home games in the Connie Mack stadium. While in the off season the Phillies purchased and traded several players. Among the purchased was Mike Marshall from the Detroit Tigers. Throughout its history, players could be added to the team via the farm system. The primary farm team was the Triple A San Diego Padres and the Double A Macon Peaches. However, no players were added this season from the farm system.

Philadelphia Phillies Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

The Philadelphia Phillies are an American professional baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Phillies compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park, located in South Philadelphia.

Pittsburgh Pirates Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

The Pittsburgh Pirates are an American professional baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pirates compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. The Pirates play their home games at PNC Park; the team previously played at Forbes Field and Three Rivers Stadium, the latter of which was named after its location near the confluence of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers. Founded on October 15, 1881 as Allegheny, the franchise has won five World Series championships. The Pirates are also often referred to as the "Bucs" or the "Buccos".

New York Mets Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Queens, New York, United States

The New York Mets are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of Queens. The Mets compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. The Mets are one of two Major League clubs based in New York City; the other is the New York Yankees of the American League East.

Contents

Regular season

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Los Angeles Dodgers 95 67 0.586 53–28 42–39
San Francisco Giants 93 68 0.578 47–34 46–34
Pittsburgh Pirates 92 70 0.568 3 46–35 46–35
Philadelphia Phillies 87 75 0.537 8 48–33 39–42
Atlanta Braves 85 77 0.525 10 43–38 42–39
St. Louis Cardinals 83 79 0.512 12 43–38 40–41
Cincinnati Reds 76 84 0.475 18 46–33 30–51
Houston Astros 72 90 0.444 23 45–36 27–54
New York Mets 66 95 0.410 28½ 32–49 34–46
Chicago Cubs 59 103 0.364 36 32–49 27–54

Record vs. Opponents

1966 National League Records

Sources:
TeamATLCHCCINHOULADNYMPHIPITSFSTL
Atlanta 7–11 10–8 14–4–1 7–11 14–4 11–7 7–11 8–10 7–11
Chicago 11–7 6–12 5–13 8–10 8–10 5–13 6–12 6–12 4–14
Cincinnati 8–10 12–6 4–14 6–12 10–7 10–8 8–10 7–10 11–7
Houston 4–14–1 13–5 14–4 7–11 7–11 7–11 4–14 6–12 10–8
Los Angeles 11–7 10–8 12–6 11–7 12–6 11–7 9–9 9–9 10–8
New York 4–14 10–8 7–10 11–7 6–12 7–11 5–13 9–9 7–11
Philadelphia 7-11 13–5 8–10 11–7 7–11 11–7 10–8 10–8 10–8
Pittsburgh 11–7 12–6 10–8 14–4 9–9 13–5 8–10 7–11 8–10
San Francisco 10–8 12–6 10–7 12–6 9–9 9–9 8–10 11–7 12–6
St. Louis 11–7 14–4 7–11 8–10 8–10 11–7 8–10 10–8 6–12

Notable Transactions

Pat Corrales American baseball player and coach

Patrick Corrales is an American former catcher and manager in Major League Baseball who played from 1964 to 1973, primarily for the Cincinnati Reds and also for the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals and San Diego Padres.

Art Mahaffey American baseball player

Arthur Mahaffey, Jr. is a former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1960–65) and St. Louis Cardinals (1966). He batted and threw right-handed. In a seven-season career, Mahaffey posted a 59–64 record with 639 strikeouts and a 4.17 ERA in 999.0 innings pitched.

Alex Johnson American baseball player

Alexander Johnson was an American professional baseball outfielder. Between 1964 and 1976, he played in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, California Angels, Cleveland Indians, Texas Rangers, New York Yankees, and Detroit Tigers. He was the National League Comeback Player of the Year in 1968 and an American League All-Star and batting champion in 1970. His brother, Ron, was an NFL running back, notably for the New York Giants.

Game Log

Legend
 Phillies win
 Phillies loss
 Postponement
BoldPhillies team member
1966 Game Log [10]
Overall Record: 87–75

Roster

1966 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers
Bo Belinsky American baseball player

Robert "Bo" Belinsky was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, who became an instant southern California celebrity as a rookie with the Los Angeles Angels, especially when the fourth of his season-opening four straight wins was a no-hitter against his former organization, the Baltimore Orioles. Belinsky is one of only two pitchers in Angels franchise history to start his career with a four-game winning streak or better.

John Morgan Boozer was an American Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies. Boozer has the distinction of being one of only four Major League Baseball players to be ejected from a game for violation of the spitball rule.

Bob Buhl American baseball player

Robert Ray Buhl was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played with the Milwaukee Braves, Chicago Cubs, and Philadelphia Phillies. His last name rhymes with "fuel".

Catchers

Infielders

Dick Allen American baseball player and singer

Richard Anthony Allen is an American former professional baseball player. During his 15-season Major League Baseball (MLB) career, he appeared primarily as a first baseman, third baseman, and outfielder, most notably for the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox, and is ranked among his sport's top offensive producers of the 1960s and early 1970s.

Dick Groat American baseball player

Richard Morrow Groat is a former two-sport athlete best known as a shortstop in Major League Baseball. He played for four National League teams, mainly the Pittsburgh Pirates and St. Louis Cardinals, and was named the league's Most Valuable Player in 1960 after winning the batting title with a .325 average for the champion Pirates. From 1956 to 1962 he teamed with second baseman Bill Mazeroski to give Pittsburgh one of the game's strongest middle infields.

Phil Linz American baseball player

Philip Francis Linz is an American former professional baseball player. Linz played in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees (1962–1965), Philadelphia Phillies (1966–1967), and New York Mets (1967–1968). He batted and threw right-handed, and was listed at 6 feet (72 in) and 180 pounds (82 kg), during his playing days.

Outfielders
Jackie Brandt American baseball player

John George Brandt Jr. is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. He was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent before the 1953 season, and played for the Cardinals (1956), New York Giants (1956), San Francisco Giants (1958–1959), Baltimore Orioles (1960–1965), Philadelphia Phillies (1966–1967), and Houston Astros (1967).

Johnny Briggs (baseball) American baseball player

John Edward Briggs is an American former left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1964–1971), Milwaukee Brewers (1971–1975), and Minnesota Twins (1975). He batted and threw left-handed.

Johnny Callison American baseball player

John Wesley Callison was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 16 seasons and is best known for the 10 years he spent with the Philadelphia Phillies as a right fielder, from 1960 through 1969. He was an All-Star for three seasons and four All-Star games. He led the National League (NL) in triples twice and doubles once, and gained his greatest prominence in the 1964 season in which he was named the MVP of the All-Star Game and he was the runner-up for the NL Most Valuable Player Award. He also led the NL in outfield assists four consecutive times and in double plays once, and ended his career among the top five Phillies in home runs (185) and triples (84).

Manager

Coaches

Peanuts Lowrey American baseball player

Harry Lee "Peanuts" Lowrey was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds (1949–50), St. Louis Cardinals (1950–54) and Philadelphia Phillies (1955).

Calvin Coolidge Julius Caesar Tuskahoma McLish, nicknamed "Bus", was an American professional baseball player and coach. As a pitcher, McLish played in Major League Baseball for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Pittsburgh Pirates (1947–48), Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians (1956–59), Cincinnati Reds (1960), Chicago White Sox (1961) and Philadelphia Phillies (1962–64). He was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed.

George Edward Myatt was an American Major and Minor League Baseball player, coach, and manager. In 1936, Boston Red Sox general manager Eddie Collins traveled to San Diego to scout Myatt in a Pacific Coast League game, but came away more impressed with his 17-year-old teammate, a San Diegan and a recent Hoover High School graduate. So Collins passed on Myatt and acquired Ted Williams, who became perhaps the greatest modern hitter and was elected, as was Collins, to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
SS Groat, Dick Dick Groat 155 584 152 .260 2 53

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Uecker, Bob Bob Uecker 78 207 43 .208 7 30

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Belinsky, Bo Bo Belinsky 9 0 2 0 2.93 8

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA San Diego Padres Pacific Coast League Frank Lucchesi
AA Macon Peaches Southern League Andy Seminick
A Bakersfield Bears California League Dick Teed
A Tidewater Tides Carolina League Bobby Morgan and Lou Kahn
A Spartanburg Phillies Western Carolinas League Bob Wellman
A-Short Season Huron Phillies Northern League Joe Lonnett
A-Short Season Eugene Emeralds Northwest League Hugh Luby

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Spartanburg

Eugene affiliation shared with St. Louis Cardinals [21]

Notes

  1. Dick Groat at Baseball Reference
  2. Rubén Amaro at Baseball Reference
  3. Rich Barry at Baseball Reference
  4. Darold Knowles at Baseball Reference
  5. Wes Covington at Baseball Reference
  6. Lowell Palmer at Baseball-Reference
  7. Mike Marshall at Baseball Reference
  8. John Herrnstein at Baseball Reference
  9. Billy Cowan at Baseball-Reference
  10. "1966 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com.
  11. "The Majors". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. April 13, 1966. p. 26. Retrieved August 20, 2015.
  12. Thisted, Red (April 19, 1966). "Monday's Game at Philly 'Rained Out': Blassingame, Bunning Duel Tonight". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 2, part 2. Retrieved August 20, 2015.
  13. "Baseball". Milwaukee Journal. April 23, 1966. p. 15. Retrieved August 20, 2015.
  14. 1 2 "The Majors". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. April 25, 1966. p. 37. Retrieved August 20, 2015.
  15. "The Nutshell". Milwaukee Sentinel. April 28, 1966. p. 2, part 2. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  16. "Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, Quebec. May 11, 1966. p. 38. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  17. "Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, Quebec. August 13, 1966. p. 27. Retrieved September 2, 2015.
  18. "Buc-Phil Tilt Rained Out". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 28, 1966. p. 22. Retrieved September 4, 2015.
  19. "Baseball Standings". Milwaukee Journal. October 2, 1966. p. 1 (Sports). Retrieved September 4, 2015.
  20. "Dodger Sure of a Flag Tie; Pirates Drop Out: Giants Win 5–4 and 2–0". Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press (AP). October 2, 1966. p. 1 (Sports). Retrieved September 4, 2015.
  21. Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

Related Research Articles

The 1958 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 77th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 67th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–82 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

The 1970 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 88th season for the franchise in Philadelphia. The Phillies finished in fifth place in the National League East with a record of 73–88, 15​12 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Phillies were playing their final season of home games at Connie Mack Stadium, before moving into their new facility, Veterans Stadium, at the start of the following season.

The 1976 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 94th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their first National League East title, as they compiled a record of 101–61, nine games ahead of the second-place Pittsburgh Pirates, and won 100 games or more for the first time in franchise history.

The 1977 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 95th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their second consecutive National League East division title with a record of 101–61, five games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Phillies lost the NLCS to the Los Angeles Dodgers, three games to one. The Phillies were managed by Danny Ozark, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

The 1966 Atlanta Braves season was the first for the franchise in Atlanta, following their relocation from Milwaukee, where the team had played the previous 13 seasons while also the 96th season overall. The Braves finished their inaugural year in Atlanta in fifth place in the National League with a record of 85–77, ten games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Braves played their first season of home games at Atlanta Stadium. The home attendance for the season was 1,539,801, sixth in the ten-team National League.

The 1966 Chicago Cubs season was the 95th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 91st in the National League and the 51st at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished tenth and last in the National League with a record of 59–103, 36 games behind the NL Champion Los Angeles Dodgers. The Cubs would not lose 100 or more games in a season for another 46 seasons. One of the defining trades in Cubs history occurred on April 21, when the Cubs acquired future Cy Young Award winner Ferguson Jenkins in a trade with the Philadelphia Phillies.

The 1975 Chicago Cubs season was the 104th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 100th in the National League and the 60th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League East with a record of 75–87.

The 1955 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. It was the first season for Phillies' manager Mayo Smith. Prior to the season, the Phillies were seen to have strong pitching with ace Robin Roberts but did not have power hitters to match pennant favorites Brooklyn, New York, or Milwaukee, behind whom the Phillies finished in fourth place with a record of 77 and 77.

The 1959 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 77th season in the history of the franchise. During spring training, manager Eddie Sawyer told the press, "We're definitely not a last place club... I think the biggest thing we've accomplished is getting rid of the losing complex. That alone makes us not a last place club." The Phillies finished in last place in 1959, seven games behind seventh-place St. Louis and 23-games behind the pennant and World Series winning Dodgers.

The 1960 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 78th in franchise history. The team finished in eighth place in the National League with a record of 59–95, 36 games behind the NL and World Series Champion Pittsburgh Pirates.

The 1961 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 69th in franchise history. The Phillies finished the season in last place in the National League at 47–107, 46 games behind the NL Champion Cincinnati Reds. The team also lost 23 games in a row, the most in the majors since 1900.

The 1963 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 81st in franchise history. The 87–75 Phillies finished the season in fourth place in the National League, 12 games behind the NL and World Champion Los Angeles Dodgers.

The 1967 Philadelphia Phillies season consisted of the Phillies' 82–80 finish, good for fifth place in the National League, 19½ games behind the NL and World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals. The Phillies would not finish above .500 again until 1975.

The 1969 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the newly established National League East with a record of 63–99, 37 games behind the division champion New York Mets, who went on to defeat Baltimore, four games to one, in the World Series. It was also the Phillies' penultimate season at Connie Mack Stadium.

The 1972 Philadelphia Phillies season saw the team finish with a record of 59–97, last place in the National League East.

The 1973 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 91st season in the history of the franchise. The team, managed by Danny Ozark, played their third season at Veterans Stadium and finished last in the National League East, 11​12 games behind the Mets.

The 1975 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 93rd in the history of the franchise. The Phillies finished in second place in the National League East with a record of 86–76, 6​12 games behind the NL East champion Pittsburgh Pirates. As a result, the Phillies had their first winning season in eight years.

The 1979 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League East, 14 games behind the first-place Pittsburgh Pirates.

The 1964 Milwaukee Braves season was the team's 12th season in Milwaukee while also the 94th season overall. The fifth-place Braves finished the season with a 88–74 (.543) record, five games behind the National League and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals.

References