1971 Ottawa Rough Riders season

Last updated
1971 Ottawa Rough Riders season
Head coach Jack Gotta
Home field Lansdowne Park
Results
Record6–8
Division place3rd, East
Playoff finishLost Eastern Semi-Final
Uniform
CFL OTT Jersey 1971.png

The 1971 Ottawa Rough Riders finished the season in 3rd place in the Eastern Conference with a 6–8 record and lost in the Eastern Semi-Final game to the Hamilton Tiger-Cats.

Contents

Preseason

WeekDateOpponentScoreResultRecord
AJuly 5vs. Winnipeg Blue Bombers19–17Loss0–1
BJuly 9at Edmonton Eskimos5–1Win1–1
BJuly 12at BC Lions41–14Win2–1
CJuly 19vs. BC Lions22–20Loss2–2

Regular season

Standings

Eastern Football Conference
TeamGPWLTPFPAPts
Toronto Argonauts 14104028924820
Hamilton Tiger-Cats 1477024224614
Ottawa Rough Riders 1468029127712
Montreal Alouettes 1468022624812

Schedule

WeekDateOpponentScoreResultRecord
1July 27vs. Edmonton Eskimos22–11Win1–0
2Aug 2at Winnipeg Blue Bombers28–22Win2–0
2Aug 4at Calgary Stampeders9–8Loss2–1
3Aug 11vs. Hamilton Tiger-Cats20–17Loss2–2
4Aug 19at Toronto Argonauts30–28Loss2–3
5Aug 27at Saskatchewan Roughriders42–21Loss2–4
6Sept 6vs. Montreal Alouettes40–17Win3–4
7Sept 11at Montreal Alouettes25–6Loss3–5
8Sept 19vs. Toronto Argonauts26–17Loss3–6
9Sept 26at Hamilton Tiger-Cats19–7Loss3–7
10Oct 3vs. Toronto Argonauts12–3Loss3–8
11Oct 9vs. BC Lions45–21Win4–8
12Bye
13Oct 23at Hamilton Tiger-Cats40–16Win5–8
14Oct 30vs. Montreal Alouettes9–7Win6–8

[1]

Postseason

RoundDateOpponentScoreResultRecord
East Semi-FinalNov 7at Hamilton Tiger-Cats23–4Loss6–9

[1]

Player stats

Passing

PlayerAttemptsCompletionsPct.YardsTouchdownsInterceptions
Rick Cassata1817742.51100714

Awards and honours

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References