1973 FA Cup Final

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1973 FA Cup Final
Old Wembley Stadium (external view).jpg
Event 1972–73 FA Cup
Date5 May 1973
Venue Wembley Stadium, London
Referee Ken Burns
Attendance100,000
1972
1974

The 1973 FA Cup Final was the 92nd final of the FA Cup. It took place on 5 May 1973 at Wembley Stadium and was contested between Leeds United, the previous season's winners and one of the dominant teams in English football at the time, and Sunderland, then playing in the Second Division.

Contents

In one of the biggest shocks in the history of the competition, Sunderland won 1–0 to become the first Second Division side to lift the Cup since West Bromwich Albion in 1931. It remains Sunderland's only major trophy since World War II. Sunderland's team were the only FA Cup winners of the 20th century not to field any full internationals,[ citation needed ] although some of their players were capped later.

Road to Wembley

Leeds United
Home teams listed first.Round 3: Norwich City 1–1 Leeds United

Replay: Leeds United 1–1 Norwich City
2nd Replay: Leeds United 5–0 Norwich City (at Villa Park)

Round 4: Leeds United 2–1 Plymouth Argyle

 

Round 5: Leeds United 2–0 WBA

 

Quarter-Final: Derby County 0–1 Leeds United

Semi-Final: Leeds United 1–0 Wolverhampton Wanderers

(at Maine Road, Manchester)

Sunderland
Home teams listed first.Round 3: Notts County 1–1 Sunderland

Replay: Sunderland 2–0 Notts County
 

Round 4: Sunderland 1–1 Reading

Replay: Reading 1–3 Sunderland

Round 5: Manchester City 2–2 Sunderland

Replay: Sunderland 3–1 Manchester City

Quarter-Final: Sunderland 2–0 Luton Town

Semi-Final: Sunderland 2–1 Arsenal

(at Hillsborough Stadium, Sheffield)

Match summary

The only goal scored Ianporterfieldgoal.jpg
The only goal scored
The final match ball with the Golden Boot awarded to Ian Porterfield of Sunderland Bckup260815 011.JPG
The final match ball with the Golden Boot awarded to Ian Porterfield of Sunderland

Sunderland established their tactics immediately from the kick-off and refused to be intimidated by their more illustrious opponents, tackling fiercely and defiantly with an unremitting determination. Leeds looked anxious, lacking their usual composure. The match itself was decided by two crucial moments that would be talked about for years to come.

After 32 minutes Sunderland took the lead when Vic Halom chested down a corner from Billy Hughes. Assisted by Dave Watson between two defenders, the deflected high ball was controlled by Ian Porterfield who shot home from 12 yards. Leeds, shocked, battled back with predictable determination. Sunderland’s goalkeeper Jimmy Montgomery was outstanding, defying Leeds with a string of fine saves and preserving his team’s lead.

The turning point of the match came midway through the second half. Montgomery dived to palm away a close range header from Trevor Cherry. It fell into the path of Lorimer who blasted goalward from 10 yards but Montgomery managed to divert the ball on to the underside of the bar and Malone scrambled the ball clear. The save has been compared with that made by England’s Gordon Banks in the 1970 FIFA World Cup match against Brazil. [1]

The North East team survived more pressure from Leeds to secure a notable upset. [2]

The 1973 showpiece is the last FA Cup final to be played with an orange ball.

Sunderland's FA Cup record, "Sunderland All the Way", was recorded by comedian Bobby Knoxall. [3]

Match details

Leeds United 0–1 Sunderland
(Report) Porterfield Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Wembley, London
Attendance: 100,000
Referee: Ken Burns, Stourbridge
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body whitecollar trineck.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Leeds United
Kit left arm red stripes.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body whitestripes.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm red stripes.png
Kit right arm.svg
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Kit socks whitetop.png
Kit socks long.svg
Sunderland
GK1 Flag of Scotland.svg David Harvey
DF2 Flag of England.svg Paul Reaney
DF3 Flag of England.svg Trevor Cherry
MF4 Flag of Scotland.svg Billy Bremner (c)
DF5 Flag of England.svg Paul Madeley
DF6 Flag of England.svg Norman Hunter
FW7 Flag of Scotland.svg Peter Lorimer
FW8 Flag of England.svg Allan Clarke
FW9 Flag of England.svg Mick Jones
MF10 Flag of Ireland.svg Johnny Giles
MF11 Flag of Scotland.svg Eddie Gray Sub off.svg 75'
Substitute:
MF12 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Terry Yorath Sub on.svg 75'
Manager:
Flag of England.svg Don Revie
GK1 Flag of England.svg Jimmy Montgomery
RB2 Flag of Scotland.svg Dick Malone
LB3 Flag of England.svg Ron Guthrie
CM4 Flag of England.svg Micky Horswill
CB5 Flag of England.svg David Watson
CB6 Flag of England.svg Richie Pitt
RCM7 Flag of Scotland.svg Bobby Kerr (c)
RW8 Flag of Scotland.svg Billy Hughes
ST9 Flag of England.svg Vic Halom
LCM10 Flag of Scotland.svg Ian Porterfield
LW11 Flag of England.svg Dennis Tueart
Substitute:
CB12 Flag of England.svg David Young
Manager:
Flag of England.svg Bob Stokoe

Match rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
  • Replay if scores still level.
  • One named substitute.

Related Research Articles

Bob Stokoe

Robert Stokoe was an English footballer and manager who was able, almost uniquely, to transcend the traditional north-east animosity between the region's footballing rivals, Newcastle United and Sunderland. As a player, he won an FA Cup winner's medal with Newcastle in 1955 and in 1973 was manager of Sunderland in their famous victory over Leeds United.

Michael David Jones is a former footballer who played as centre forward with Leeds United during the 1960s and 1970s. He was also capped for England.

Jimmy Montgomery English footballer

Jimmy Montgomery BEM is an English retired footballer who played as a goalkeeper. He made a record 627 appearances for his hometown club Sunderland with 537 of these appearances being in the league, after joining the club as a youngster in 1960.

Ian Porterfield

John Ian Porterfield was a Scottish professional footballer, and an experienced football coach who worked at both club and international level for almost 30 years. At the time of his death, he was the coach of the Armenian national team.

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References

  1. "Dream comes true for Sunderland". Glasgow Herald (page 4). 7 May 1973. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  2. "1973 FA Cup Rune". Roker Roar.com. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  3. Tim Booler and Jessica Forster (21 July 2009). "Comic legend Bobby Knoxall dies". Sunderland Echo. Archived from the original on 27 July 2009. Retrieved 22 July 2009.
Fans line the streets as the Sunderland team return home after winning the FA Cup 1973facuphomecoming.jpg
Fans line the streets as the Sunderland team return home after winning the FA Cup