1973 NCAA Division III football season

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The 1973 NCAA Division III football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division III level, began in August 1973, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship in December 1973 at Garrett-Harrison Stadium in Phenix City, Alabama. This was the first season for Division III (and Division II) football, which were formerly in the College Division in 1972 and prior.

Contents

Wittenberg won their first Division III championship, defeating Juniata in the championship game by a final score of 41−0. [1]

Conference changes and new programs

School1972 conference1973 conference
Albany New program NCAA Division III independent

Conference standings

1973 College Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Southwestern (TN) $200  432
Sewanee 110  530
Centre 020  090
  • $ Conference champion
1973 College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Carthage $^800  820
Millikin 620  820
Augustana (IL) 620  720
Illinois Wesleyan 530  540
Carroll (WI) 350  450
Elmhurst 350  450
North Park 260  360
Wheaton (IL) 260  270
North Central (IL) 170  270
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ – NAIA Division II playoff participant
1973 Independent College Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Ithaca $200  540
Hobart 311  711
Alfred 210  720
St. Lawrence 220  530
RIT 021  351
RPI 030  190
  • $ Conference champion
1973 Indiana Collegiate Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Butler $410  550
DePauw 320  630
Evansville 320  550
Indiana Central 230  730
Valparaiso 230  650
Saint Joseph's (IN) 140  370
Wabash 040  550
  • $ Conference champion
1973 Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Buena Vista $700  810
Central (IA) 610  720
Wartburg 430  540
Dubuque 331  541
William Penn 340  640
Luther 241  261
Simpson 151  261
Upper Iowa 061  171
  • $ Conference champion
1973 Metropolitan Intercollegiate Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
C. W. Post $500  1010
Hofstra 410  830
Fordham 220  640
Merchant Marine 120  550
Seton Hall 020  340
Saint Peter's 020  090
Wagner 030  450
  • $ Conference champion
1973 Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Hope $500  720
Olivet 320  630
Albion 320  360
Alma 230  540
Kalamazoo 230  440
Adrian 050  180
  • $ Conference champion
1973 Middle Atlantic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Northern
Juniata x^510  1020
Wilkes 510  530
Albright 530  550
Delaware Valley 431  430
Lycoming 250  260
Susquehanna 160  270
Upsala 070  180
Wagner *210  450
Southern
Franklin & Marshall x810  810
Widener 710  810
Muhlenberg 711  711
Johns Hopkins 420  630
Western Maryland 420  540
Moravian 351  351
Lebanon Valley 252  252
Dickinson 152  152
Ursinus 151  251
Swarthmore 070  070
  • x Division champion/co-champions
  • ^ NCAA Division III playoff participant
  • * – Ineligible due to insufficient conference games
    Juniata won Northern Section on Hazlett point system
1973 Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
St. Thomas (MN) +610  910
Minnesota–Duluth +610  810
Augsburg 520  720
Gustavus Adolphus 430  550
Concordia–Moorhead 340  550
Saint John's (MN) 340  440
Hamline 160  360
Macalester 070  190
  • + Conference co-champions
1973 New England Football Conference standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Nichols $400  810
Plymouth State 320  620
Bridgewater State 220  550
Curry 221  351
Maine Maritime 230  450
Boston State 041  161
  • $ Conference champion
1973 New Jersey State Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Montclair State $400  640
Jersey City State 410  910
Trenton State 320  730
Glassboro State 230  460
Kean 130  450
William Paterson 050  370
  • $ Conference champion
1973 Ohio Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Blue Division
Marietta xy310  640
Muskingum 211  531
Ohio Wesleyan 211  351
Otterbein 121  441
Denison 031  351
Red Division
No. 4 Wittenberg xy$^500  1200
Baldwin–Wallace 410  630
Wooster 320  530
Heidelberg 230  630
Capital 140  440
Mount Union 050  360
Not competing for championship
Kenyon     540
Oberlin     450
Championship: Wittenberg 35, Marietta 7
  • $ Conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
  • y Championship game participant
  • ^ NCAA Division III playoff participant
Rankings from AP Poll
1973 Presidents' Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
John Carroll $502  712
Allegheny 511  531
Thiel 421  621
Hiram 430  540
Carnegie Mellon 430  530
Bethany (WV) 250  351
Washington & Jefferson 250  270
Case Western Reserve 070  090
  • $ Conference champion
1973 Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Redlands $500  810
Whittier 320  630
La Verne 320  450
Claremont-Mudd 230  350
Occidental 230  260
Pomona-Pitzer 050  171
  • $ Conference champion
1973 NCAA Division III independents football records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Bridgeport ^    910
Colorado College     910
San Diego ^    921
Albany     720
Salisbury State     720
Norwich     630
Rochester (NY)     630
Brockport     530
Maryville (TN)     540
Lake Forest     341
Saint Mary's     341
Georgetown     350
Cortland     171
  • ^ NCAA Division III playoff participant

Conference champions

ConferenceChampion(s)
College Athletic Conference Southwestern at Memphis
College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin Carthage
Independent College Athletic Conference Champion unknown
Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Buena Vista
Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association Hope
Middle Atlantic Conference North: Juniata
South: Franklin & Marshall
Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference Coe
Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Minnesota–Duluth
St. Thomas (MN)
New England Football Conference Nichols
New Jersey State Athletic Conference Montclair State
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (Division III) Fisk
Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Redlands

Postseason

The 1973 NCAA Division III Football Championship playoffs were the first single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division III college football. The inaugural edition had only four teams (in comparison with the 32 teams competing as of 2014). The championship game was held at Garrett-Harrison Stadium in Phenix City, Alabama. The Wittenberg Tigers defeated the Juniata College Eagles, 41−0, to win their first national title. [2]

Playoff bracket

Semifinals
Campus Sites
National Championship Game
Garrett-Harrison Stadium
Phenix City, AL
      
Juniata 35
Bridgeport 14
Juniata 0
Wittenberg41
Wittenberg 21
San Diego 14

See also

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References

  1. "All-Time Division III Football Championship Records" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. pp. 4–15. Retrieved October 23, 2014.
  2. "1973 NCAA Division III National Football Championship Bracket" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. p. 14. Retrieved October 23, 2014.