1975 New York Yankees season

Last updated

1975 New York Yankees
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) George Steinbrenner
General manager(s) Gabe Paul
Manager(s) Bill Virdon, Billy Martin
Local television WPIX (Phil Rizzuto, Frank Messer, Bill White)
Local radio WMCA
(Frank Messer, Phil Rizzuto, Bill White, Dom Valentino / John Sterling)
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The 1975 New York Yankees season was the 73rd season for the Yankees in New York, and the franchise's 75th season overall. The team finished with a record of 83–77, finishing 12 games behind the Boston Red Sox. The Yankees played at Shea Stadium due to the ongoing renovation of Yankee Stadium, which would re-open in 1976.

New York Yankees Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in the Bronx, New York, United States

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles. Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.

The 1975 Boston Red Sox season was the 75th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League East with a record of 95 wins and 65 losses. Following a sweep of the Oakland Athletics in the ALCS, the Red Sox lost the World Series to the Cincinnati Reds in seven games. In their 4 losses in the World Series, they had at least a one run lead in each game, only to let the Reds come back and win all 4, spoiling the Sox's chances at winning the World Series for the first time since 1918, which would have ended the Curse of the Bambino. In game 7, the Red Sox had a 3-0 lead at one point, but the Reds rallied back to spoil the Red Sox chances of a major upset.

Shea Stadium 1964-2009 sports stadium in Queens, New York, USA

Shea Stadium was a stadium in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, Queens, New York City. Built as a multi-purpose stadium, it was the home park of Major League Baseball's New York Mets for 45 seasons (1964–2008), as well as the New York Jets football team from 1964 to 1983.

Contents

Bill Virdon opened the season as Yankees manager, but he was replaced on August 1 by Billy Martin. This would be the first of five stints as Yankees manager for Martin.

Bill Virdon American baseball player and coach

William Charles Virdon is an American former professional baseball outfielder, manager, and coach in Major League Baseball (MLB). Virdon played in MLB for the St. Louis Cardinals and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1955 through 1965 and in 1968. He served as a coach for the Pirates and Houston Astros, and managed the Pirates, Astros, New York Yankees, and Montreal Expos.

Billy Martin American baseball player and manager

Alfred Manuel Martin Jr., commonly called Billy, was an American Major League Baseball second baseman and manager who, as well as leading other teams, was five times the manager of the New York Yankees. Known first as a scrappy infielder who made considerable contributions to the championship Yankee teams of the 1950s, he built a reputation as a manager who would initially make bad teams good, and then be fired amid dysfunction. In each of his stints with the Yankees, he managed them to winning records before being fired or forced to resign by team owner George Steinbrenner, usually amid a well-publicized scandal such as Martin's involvement in an alcohol-fueled fight.

Offseason

Bobby Murcer American baseball player

Bobby Ray Murcer was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played for 17 seasons between 1965 and 1983, mostly with the New York Yankees, whom he later rejoined as a longtime broadcaster. A Gold Glove winner and five-time All-Star, Murcer led the American League in on-base percentage in 1971, and in runs and total bases in 1972.

San Francisco Giants Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in San Francisco, California, United States

The San Francisco Giants are an American professional baseball team based in San Francisco, California. Founded in 1883 as the New York Gothams, and renamed three years later the New York Giants, the team eventually moved to San Francisco in 1958. The Giants compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) West division.

Bobby Bonds American baseball player and coach

Bobby Lee Bonds was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball from 1968 to 1981, primarily with the San Francisco Giants. Noted for his outstanding combination of power hitting and speed, he was the first player to have more than two seasons of 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases, doing so a record five times, and was the first to accomplish the feat in both major leagues; he became the second player to hit 300 career home runs and steal 300 bases, joining Willie Mays. Together with Barry, he is part of baseball's most accomplished father-son combination, holding the record for combined home runs, RBIs, and stolen bases. A prolific leadoff hitter, he also set major league records for most times leading off a game with a home run in a career (35) and a season ; both records have since been broken.

Regular season

Season standings

AL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Boston Red Sox 95650.59447–3448–31
Baltimore Orioles 90690.56644–3346–36
New York Yankees 83770.5191243–3540–42
Cleveland Indians 79800.49715½41–3938–41
Milwaukee Brewers 68940.4202836–4532–49
Detroit Tigers 571020.35837½31–4926–53

Record vs. opponents

1975 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBALBOSCALCWSCLEDETKCMILMINNYYOAKTEX
Baltimore 9–96–67–410–812–47–514–46–68–104–87–5
Boston 9–96–68–47–1113–57–510–810–211–56–68–4
California 6–66–69–93–96–54–147–58–107–57–119–9
Chicago 4–74–89–97–55–79–98–49–96–69–95–13
Cleveland 8–1011–79–35–712–66–69–93–69–92–105–7
Detroit 4–125–135–67–56–126–67–114–86–126–61–11
Kansas City 5–75–714–49–96–66–67–511–77–511–714–4
Milwaukee 4–148–105–74–89–911–75–72–109–95–76–6
Minnesota 6–62–1010–89–96–38–47–1110–24–86–128–10
New York 10–85–115–76–69–912–65–79–98–46–68–4
Oakland 8–46–611–79–910–26–611–77–512–66–612–6
Texas 5–74–89–913–57–511–14–146–610–84–86–12

Notable transactions

James Louis Beattie is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He also served as the Montreal Expos' General Manager from 1995 to 2001, and was the Baltimore Orioles general manager with Mike Flanagan from 2003 to 2005. As of 2010, Beattie served as a professional scout in the Toronto Blue Jays organization through the 2018 season. Beattie retired from his decades-long career in the MLB at the end of the 2018 season. Beattie starred in baseball and basketball at South Portland High School in South Portland, Maine.

Willie Clay Upshaw is a retired Major League Baseball player who played first base for the Toronto Blue Jays and Cleveland Indians (1988), both of the American League.

Edwin Albert Brinkman was an American professional baseball player, coach and scout. He played for 15 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop, most notably for the Washington Senators and the Detroit Tigers. Brinkman led the American League in games played twice, won a Gold Glove Award at shortstop, and had a career batting average of .224. He was named to the American League All-Star team in 1973.

Roster

1975 New York Yankees
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

OutfieldersManager

Coaches

Player stats

= Indicates team leader

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABRHAvg.HRRBISB
C Thurman Munson 15759783190.318121023
1B Chris Chambliss 15056266171.3049720
2B Sandy Alomar 15148961117.23923928
3B Graig Nettles 15758171155.26721911
SS Jim Mason 942231734.1522160
LF Roy White 14856681161.290125916
CF Elliott Maddox 552183667.3071239
RF Bobby Bonds 14552993143.270328530
DH Ed Herrmann 802001651.2556300

[9]

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
Fred Stanley 11725256.222015
Rick Dempsey 7114538.262111
Ed Brinkman 446311.17502
Kerry Dineen 7228.36401
Otto Vélez 682.25001
Larry Murray 610.00000

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Catfish Hunter 3932823142.58177
Doc Medich 38272.116163.50132
Rudy May 3221214123.06145
Pat Dobson 33207.211144.07129
Larry Gura 26151.1783.5165

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGWLSVERASO
Sparky Lyle 495763.1265
Tippy Martinez 231282.6820
Dave Pagan 130014.0618
Ron Guidry 100103.4515
Rick Sawyer 40003.003
Mike Wallace 300014.542

Farm system

LevelTeamLeagueManager
AAA Syracuse Chiefs International League Bobby Cox
AA West Haven Yankees Eastern League Pete Ward
A Fort Lauderdale Yankees Florida State League Leo Posada
A-Short Season Oneonta Yankees New York–Penn League Mike Ferraro

[10]

Notes

  1. "Bobby Murcer Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  2. "Joe Pactwa Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  3. "Sam McDowell Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  4. "Catfish Hunter Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  5. "Gene Michael Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. "Jim Beattie Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  7. "Willie Upshaw Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  8. "Ed Brinkman Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  9. "1975 New York Yankees Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  10. Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

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References