1975 Rugby League World Cup

Last updated

1975 (1975) World Cup  ()
1975wcsr.png
Number of teams5
WinnerFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (4th title)

Matches played21
Attendance204,476 (9,737 per match)
Points scored661 (31.48 per match)
Top scorer Flag of Australia (converted).svg Mick Cronin (76)
Top try scorers Flag of England.svg Keith Fielding (7)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ian Schubert (7)
 < 1972
1977 > 

The 1975 Rugby League World Championship (also referred to as the World Series [1] ) was the seventh tournament for the Rugby League World Cup. The format differed from that employed in previous competitions; no single country hosted the matches, which were spread out in a 'world series' hosted by each of the five participating nations over a period of just over eight months. Each team had to play the others on a 'home and away' basis. Great Britain were split up into separate England and Wales teams, taking advantage of a glut of Welsh talent in the British game at the time.

Contents

No final was held, with Australia being deemed the champions by virtue of finishing on top of the table [2] with England coming in second. [3]

Teams

Venues

14 venues across the five competing countries hosted games of the 1975 Rugby League World Cup. Wales used their own home venue at Swansea, but also played home games in England in both Salford and Warrington. England also played a 'home' game against Wales at Lang Park in Brisbane, Australia.

Flag of Australia (converted).svg Sydney Flag of France.svg Marseille Flag of Australia (converted).svg Brisbane Flag of England.svg Bradford Flag of England.svg Wigan
Sydney Cricket Ground Stade Vélodrome Lang Park Odsal Stadium Central Park
Capacity: 70,000Capacity: 49,000Capacity: 40,000Capacity: 40,000Capacity: 40,000
Sydney Showground and Cricket Ground 1936 (14019783946).jpg Vue du virage Depe.jpg Suncorp-Stadium-Milton-Queensland.jpg Odsal Stadium - geograph.org.uk - 60082.jpg Central park kop.jpg
Flag of France.svg Toulouse Flag of France.svg Bordeaux Flag of England.svg Leeds Flag of New Zealand.svg Auckland Flag of England.svg Salford
Stadium Municipal Stade du Parc Lescure Headingley Carlaw Park The Willows
Capacity: 35,000Capacity: 30,000Capacity: 30,000Capacity: 20,000Capacity: 17,000
Stadium de Toulouse.jpg South Stand, Headingley Stadium during the second day of the England-Sri Lanka test (21st April 2014) 001.JPG Carlaw Park.jpg The Willows North Stand - geograph.org.uk - 43344.jpg
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Swansea Flag of New Zealand.svg Christchurch Flag of England.svg Warrington Flag of France.svg Perpignan
St Helen's Rugby Ground Addington Showgrounds Wilderspool Stadium Stade Gilbert Brutus
Capacity: 15,000Capacity: 15,000Capacity: 15,000Capacity: 13,000
St Helen's.DSC00503.JPG Addington Rugby Stadium.jpg Tribune Guasch Laborde.JPG

Results

2 March
France  Flag of France.svg14 – 7Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Stade Municipal, Toulouse
Attendance: 7,563
Referee: Fred Lindop Flag of England.svg
16 March
England  Flag of England.svg20 – 2Flag of France.svg  France
Headingley, Leeds
Attendance: 10,842
Referee: Keith Page Flag of Australia (converted).svg (Harry Hunt Flag of England.svg )
1 June
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg36 – 8Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Lang Park, Brisbane
Attendance: 12,000
Referee: Francois Escande Flag of France.svg
10 June
England  Flag of England.svg7 – 12Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Lang Park, Brisbane
Attendance: 6,000
Referee: Don Lancashire Flag of Australia (converted).svg
14 June
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg30 – 13Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney
Attendance: 25,386
Referee: Francois Escande Flag of France.svg

In this match Mick Cronin kicked nine goals.

15 June
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg27 – 0Flag of France.svg  France
21 June
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg17 – 17Flag of England.svg  England
Carlaw Park, Auckland
Attendance: 12,000
Referee: Laurie Bruyeres Flag of Australia (converted).svg
22 June
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg26 – 6Flag of France.svg  France
Lang Park, Brisbane
Attendance: 9,000
Referee: John Percival Flag of New Zealand.svg
28 June
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg10 – 10Flag of England.svg  England
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney
Attendance: 33,858
Referee: John Percival Flag of New Zealand.svg
28 June
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg13 – 8Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Carlaw Park, Auckland
Attendance: 9,368
Referee: Laurie Bruyeres Flag of Australia (converted).svg
20 September
Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg16 – 22Flag of England.svg  England
Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington
Attendance: 5,034
Referee: Marcel Caillol Flag of France.svg
27 September
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg8 – 24Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Carlaw Park, Auckland
Attendance: 18,000
Referee: Fred Lindop Flag of England.svg
11 October
France  Flag of France.svg2 – 48Flag of England.svg  England
Stade du Parc Lescure, Bordeaux
Attendance: 1,581
Referee: John Percival Flag of New Zealand.svg

England winger Keith Fielding created a new record by scoring four tries against a hapless French team at Bordeaux.

17 October
France  Flag of France.svg12 – 12Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Stade Vélodrome, Marseille
Attendance: 10,000
Referee: Billy Thompson Flag of England.svg
19 October
Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg6 – 18Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
St. Helen's Rugby Ground, Swansea
Attendance: 11,112
Referee: John Percival Flag of New Zealand.svg

Kangaroo wing prodigy Ian Schubert also scored a hat-trick tries.

25 October
England  Flag of England.svg27 – 12Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Odsal Stadium, Bradford
Attendance: 5,507
Referee: Andre Lacaze Flag of France.svg

English stand-off Ken Gill ran in three tries.

26 October
France  Flag of France.svg2 – 41Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Stade Gilbert Brutus, Perpignan
Attendance: 10,440
Referee: Billy Thompson Flag of England.svg
1 November
England  Flag of England.svg16 – 13Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Central Park, Wigan
Attendance: 9,353
Referee: John Percival Flag of New Zealand.svg
2 November
Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg25 – 24Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
St. Helen's Rugby Ground, Swansea
Attendance: 2,645
Referee: Georges Jameau Flag of France.svg

In this match Jim Mills, the Wales prop, was banned for the rest of the season after an altercation. The ban was eventually lifted on 2 January 1976.

6 November
Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg23 – 2Flag of France.svg  France
The Willows, Salford
Attendance: 2,247
Referee: Fred Lindop Flag of England.svg

Final standings

TeamPlayedWonDrewLost For AgainstDifferencePoints
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 861119869+12913
Flag of England.svg  England 852116784+8312
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 8305110130−206
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 8224121149−286
Flag of France.svg  France 811640204−1643

Final challenge match

As Australia had not beaten England to win the cup, a final challenge was hastily arranged. The Kangaroos showed they were worthy World Champions with a comprehensive 25–0 win at Headingley in front of a disappointing crowd of 7,680 which was over 11,000 less than had attended the 1970 World Cup Final between Great Britain and Australia at the same venue.

12 November
England  Flag of England.svg0 – 25Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Headingley, Leeds
Attendance: 7,680
Referee: Fred Lindop Flag of England.svg

Try scorers

7
5
4
3
2
1

Related Research Articles

The 1977 Rugby League World Cup was the eighth Rugby League World Cup tournament and was held in Australasia, with games played during May and June in both Australia and New Zealand. It featured four teams: Great Britain and France in addition to the two host nations. All teams played each other once, resulting in a top two of Great Britain and Australia who played in the tournament final at the Sydney Cricket Ground with the home team winning by one point.

The 1985–1988 Rugby League World Cup was the ninth Rugby League World Cup tournament held and saw yet another change of format with competition stretched to cover almost three years. The national rugby league teams of Australia, France, Great Britain, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea played each other on a home and away basis. These matches were fitted into the normal international programme of three-match test series between the nations, with a pre-designated match from each series counting as the world cup fixture.

The 1989–1992 Rugby League World Cup was the tenth staging of the Rugby League World Cup, and continued to use the three-year format, stretching across the years 1989 to 1992. As with the 1985–1988 World Cup, teams played each other on a home-and-away basis. These matches were fitted into the normal international programme of three-match test series between the nations, with a pre-designated match from each series counting as the World Cup fixture.

1995 Rugby League World Cup

The 1995 Rugby League World Cup was held during October in the United Kingdom. It was the eleventh staging of the Rugby League World Cup and was marketed as the Halifax Centenary World Cup, reflecting the tournament's sponsorship and the fact that 1995 marked the centenary of the sport. Envisaged as a celebration of rugby league football, the size of the competition was doubled, with four additional teams invited and Great Britain split into England and Wales

The Australian national rugby league team, the Kangaroos, have represented Australia in senior men's rugby league football competition since the establishment of the 'Northern Union game' in Australia in 1908. Administered by the Australian Rugby League Commission, the Kangaroos are ranked second in the RLIF World Rankings. The team is the most successful in Rugby League World Cup history, having contested all 15 and won 11 of them, failing to reach the final only once, in the inaugural tournament in 1954. Only five nations have beaten Australia in test matches, and Australia have an overall win percentage of 69%.

Paul Vautin

Paul "Fatty" Vautin is an Australian football commentator and formerly a professional rugby league footballer, captain and coach. He has provided commentary for the Nine Network's coverage of rugby league since joining the network in 1992 and has also hosted The Footy Show since its beginnings in 1994 opposite co-host Peter Sterling, until 2017. An Australian Kangaroos test and Queensland State of Origin representative lock or second-row forward, Vautin played club football in Brisbane with Wests, before moving to Sydney in 1979 to play with Manly-Warringah, whom he would captain to the 1987 NSWRL premiership. He also played for Sydney's Eastern Suburbs, and in England for St Helens.

Peter Sterling (rugby league)

Peter Maxwell John Sterling OAM nicknamed Sterlo, is an Australian rugby league commentator, television personality and former player. He was one of the all-time great halfbacks and a major contributor to Parramatta Eels' dominance of the New South Wales Rugby League premiership in the 1980s. Sterling played eighteen Tests for the Australian national team between 1982 and 1988. He also played in thirteen State of Origins for New South Wales, winning man of the match on four occasions. Sterling played in four premiership-winning sides with Parramatta in 1981–1983 and 1986 and has been inducted into the Australian Rugby League Hall of Fame. His time spent playing for English club Hull F.C. also earned him membership in their hall of fame.

Robert Fulton AM is a former professional rugby league footballer, coach and commentator. Fulton played, coached, selected for and has commentated on the game with great success at the highest levels and has been named amongst Australia's greatest rugby league players of the 20th century. As a player Fulton won three premierships with the Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles in the 1970s, the last as captain. He represented for the Australian national side on thirty-five occasions, seven times as captain. He had a long coaching career at the first grade level, taking Manly to premiership victory in 1987 and 1996. He coached the Australian national team to thirty-nine Tests and World Cup games. He was a New South Wales State selector and a national selector. He is currently a radio commentator with 2GB. In 1985 he was selected as one of the initial four post-war "Immortals" of the Australian game and in 2008 he was named in Australia's team of the century.

Graham "Wombat" Eadie, is an Australian former rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He has been named amongst Australia's finest of the 20th century. A New South Wales State of Origin and Australian international representative fullback, he played in Australia during Manly-Warringah's dominance of the NSWRFL competition during the 1970s. He won four premierships with them and his 1,917 points in first grade and 2,070 points in all grades were both records at the time of his retirement. Eadie also played in England for Halifax, winning the Challenge Cup Final of 1987 with them. He also won World Cups with Australia and collected awards such as the Rothmans Medal and Lance Todd Trophy.

Steve Ella is an Australian former rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s. He was a utility back for the Parramatta Eels, New South Wales and Australia, playing in 4 Tests for Australia between 1983 and 1985. He is a cousin of the Ella brothers who were prominent in Australian rugby union in the 1980s.

Michael William Cronin OAM is an Australian former professional rugby league footballer and coach. He was a goal-kicking centre for the Australian national team and a stalwart for the Parramatta Eels club. He played in 22 Tests and 11 World Cup matches between 1973 and 1982. Cronin retired as the NSWRL Premiership's and the Australian Kangaroos' all-time highest point-scorer and has since been named amongst the nation's finest footballers of the 20th century.

The 1986 New South Wales Rugby League premiership was the seventy-ninth season of professional rugby league football in Australia. Thirteen clubs competed for the J J Giltinan Shield and Winfield Cup during the season, which culminated in a grand final between the Parramatta Eels and Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs which featured the introduction of the Clive Churchill Medal. This season, NSWRL teams also competed for the 1986 National Panasonic Cup.

Rugby League World Cup International rugby league football tournament

The Rugby League World Cup is an international rugby league tournament, contested by national teams of the Rugby League International Federation, which was first held in France in 1954, the first World Cup in either rugby code. The idea of a rugby league World Cup tournament was first mooted in the 1930s with the French proposal to hold a tournament in 1931, and again in 1951. The fifteen tournaments held to date have been at intervals ranging from two to eight years, and have featured a number of formats. So far three nations have won the competition. Australia, France and New Zealand are the only teams to have played in all tournaments. Since 2000, the RLIF has also organised World Cups for women, students and other categories. The 2017 Rugby League World Cup was held in Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea which was won by Australia.

The 1967–68 Rugby Football League season was the 73rd season of rugby league football.

The 1991 Trans-Tasman Test series was an international rugby league test series played in Australia between Australia and New Zealand. The series, which started on 3 July in Melbourne and finished on 31 July in Brisbane, consisted of three test matches, with the third test doubling as a 1989–1992 Rugby League World Cup tournament match. New Zealand did not play in any other matches while on tour.

The 2013 Rugby League World Cup final was the conclusive game of the 2013 Rugby League World Cup tournament and was played between New Zealand and Australia on 30 November 2013 at Old Trafford, Manchester, England. Australia won the final by 34 points to 2 in front of a sell-out crowd, finishing the tournament undefeated. They reclaimed the cup from New Zealand, who had defeated them in the 2008 final. The Kangaroos won the Rugby League World Cup for the tenth time, and the first time since 2000. Their five-eighth, Johnathan Thurston was named man-of-the-match.

The 1978 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France comprised the Australia national rugby league team's fourteenth tour of Great Britain and ninth tour of France, and took place from September to December 1978. Coached by Frank Stanton and captained by Bob Fulton, the Australian team, also known as the Kangaroos, played a match against Wales before contesting the Ashes series against Great Britain, winning the third and deciding Test match. The tourists then moved on to France where they were narrowly beaten in both Tests, the last series the Kangaroos would lose until 2005. In addition to these six internationals, the Australians played sixteen other matches against local club and representative sides in both countries. The 1978 Kangaroo tour followed the tour of 1973 while the next tour would be staged in 1982.

1988 Rugby League World Cup Final

The 1988 Rugby League World Cup final was the conclusive game of the 1985–1988 Rugby League World Cup tournament and was played between New Zealand and Australia on 9 October 1988 at Eden Park in Auckland, New Zealand. Australia won the final by 25 points to 12 in front of a New Zealand rugby league record attendance of 47,363. Australia, the defending champions, won the Rugby League World Cup for the 6th time.

1977 Rugby League World Cup Final

The 1977 Rugby League World Cup Final was the conclusive game of the 1977 Rugby League World Cup tournament and was played between Australia and Great Britain on 25 June 1977 at the Sydney Cricket Ground in Australia.

This is a list of the five national teams who played the 1975 Rugby League World Cup.

References

  1. Clarkson, Alan (10 June 1974). "Fulton battles injury". The Sydney Morning Herald. Australia. Archived from the original on 30 July 2016. Retrieved 11 February 2010.
  2. Paddy McAteer (22 December 2010) "Whole World in their Hands" Archived 5 October 2012 at the Wayback Machine North West Evening Mail
  3. "World Cup 1975" at 188-rugby-league.co.uk Archived 7 August 2009 at the Wayback Machine