1981–82 Challenge Cup

Last updated
1981–82 State Express Challenge Cup
Duration6 Rounds
Number of teams33
Winners Hullcolours.svg Hull
Runners-up Widnes colours.svg Widnes
Lance Todd Trophy Widnes colours.svg Eddie Cunningham

The 1981–82 Challenge Cup was the 81st staging of rugby league's oldest knockout competition, the Challenge Cup. Known as the State Express Challenge Cup for sponsorship reasons, the final was contested by Widnes and Hull F.C. at Wembley. The match ended as a draw, resulting in a replay being staged at Elland Road, which Hull won 18–9.

Contents

Preliminary round

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamAttendance
1 Hull Kingston Rovers 22–18 Featherstone Rovers 8,090

First round

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamAttendance
1 St. Helens 12–20 Wigan 7,611
2 Workington Town 32–8 Blackpool Borough 1,410
3 Batley 23–15 Huyton 908
4 Bradford Northern 14–12 Dewsbury 4,176
5 Bramley 4–16 Wakefield Trinity 3,180
6 Cardiff City 8–19 Widnes 6,484
7 Carlisle 2–17 Castleford 5,452
8 Doncaster 6–7 Rochdale Hornets 736
9 Fulham 14–4 Hunslet 3,392
10 Halifax 17–12 Huddersfield 3,991
11 Hull 29–15 Salford 13,697
12 Keighley 6–12 Barrow 4,015
13 Leigh 28–17 Warrington 10,366
14 Swinton 5–15 Oldham 4,095
15 Whitehaven 7–17 Hull Kingston Rovers 3,965
16 York 6–34 Leeds 6,862

Second round

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamAttendance
1 Hull Kingston Rovers 17–18 Leigh 12,034
2 Barrow 1–9 Leeds 9,677
3 Batley 6–31 Castleford 3,754
4 Bradford Northern 17–8 Workington Town 5,134
5 Fulham 5–11 Hull 9,481
6 Halifax 28–7 Rochdale Hornets 3,919
7 Wakefield Trinity 18–12 Oldham 6,567
8 Wigan 7–9 Widnes 17,467

Third round

Tie noHome teamScoreAway teamAttendance
1 Bradford Northern 8–8 Widnes 9,570
replay Widnes 10–7 Bradford Northern 11,877
2 Hull 16–10 Halifax 16,555
3 Leigh 3–8 Castleford 11,791
4 Wakefield Trinity 2–20 Leeds 10,579

Semi finals

27 March 1982
Hull 15 – 11 Castleford
Try: Kemble, Norton, O'Hara, Prendiville
Goal: Crooks
Drop goal: Topliss
Report Try: Reilly
Goal: Hyde (4)
Headingley, Leeds
Attendance: 21,207
Referee: Billy Thompson (Huddersfield) [1]
3 April 1982
Widnes 11 – 8 Leeds
Try: Basnett (2), O'Loughlin
Goal: J. Myler
Report Try: Dyl, Heron
Goal: Dick
Station Road, Swinton
Attendance: 13,075
Referee: Fred Lindop (Wakefield) [2]

Final

Widnes returned to Wembley as defending champions, having won the Challenge Cup for the sixth time in their history in the previous year.

1 May 1982
Hull 14 – 14 Widnes
Try: Norton, O'Hara
Goal: Lloyd (4)
Report Try: Cunningham (2), Wright
Goal: Burke, Gregory
Drop goal: Elwell
Wembley, London
Attendance: 92,147
Referee: Fred Lindop (Wakefield)
Man of the Match: Eddie Cunningham

Widnes led by eight points with 15 minutes of the game remaining, but Hull F.C. came back to draw the match 14–14, meaning the final would be replayed for the first time since 1954. [3]

Replay

19 May 1982
Hull 18 – 9 Widnes
Try: Kemble, Topliss (2), Crooks
Goal: Crooks (3)
Report Try: Wright
Goal: Burke (3)
Elland Road, Leeds
Attendance: 41,171
Referee: Fred Lindop (Wakefield)
Man of the Match: David Topliss [4]

Related Research Articles

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Arthur Bunting

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Michael "Mick"/"Mike" Crane is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Hull F.C., Leeds and Hull Kingston Rovers, as a centre, Second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 3 or 4, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

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The 1980–81 Challenge Cup was the 80th staging of rugby league's oldest knockout competition, the Challenge Cup. Known as the Three Fives Challenge Cup for sponsorship reasons, the final was contested by Widnes and Hull Kingston Rovers at Wembley, with Widnes winning 18–9.

The 1982–83 Challenge Cup was the 82nd staging of rugby league's oldest knockout competition, the Challenge Cup. Known as the State Express Challenge Cup for sponsorship reasons, the final was contested by Featherstone Rovers and Hull F.C. at Wembley. Featherstone won the match 14–12, and is considered one of the biggest upsets in Challenge Cup final history.

The 1983–84 Challenge Cup was the 83rd staging of rugby league's oldest knockout competition, the Challenge Cup. Known as the State Express Challenge Cup due to sponsorship by State Express 555, the final was contested by Widnes and Wigan at Wembley. Widnes won the match 19–6.

References

  1. Kennedy, Edward (29 March 1982). "Hull weather storm". The Guardian. p. 17. ProQuest   186264954.
  2. "O'Loughlin takes a winning stroll". The Observer. London. 4 April 1982. p. 48. ProQuest   476755126.
  3. Nicholson, Geoffrey (2 May 1982). "One Hull of a fightback". The Observer. London. p. 41. ProQuest   476766355.
  4. "Totally Topliss". The Guardian. 20 May 1982. p. 26. ProQuest   186308640.