1983 Copa América

Last updated
1983 Copa América
Tournament details
DatesAugust 10 – November 4
Teams10 (from 1 confederation)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay (12th title)
Runners-upFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Third placeFlag of Peru (state).svg  Peru
Fourth placeFlag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay
Tournament statistics
Matches played24
Goals scored55 (2.29 per match)
Attendance1,119,738 (46,656 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Uruguay.svg Carlos Aguilera
Flag of Argentina.svg Jorge Luis Burruchaga
Flag of Brazil.svg Roberto Dinamite
(3 goals each)
Best player(s) Flag of Uruguay.svg Enzo Francéscoli
1979
1987

The 1983 Copa América football tournament was played between August 10 and November 4, with all ten CONMEBOL members participating. Defending champions Paraguay received a bye into the semi-finals.

Contents

Squads

Group stage

Argentina playing Ecuador in Quito Ecuador argentina 1983.jpg
Argentina playing Ecuador in Quito

The teams were drawn into three groups, consisting of three teams each. Each team played twice (home and away) against the other teams in their group, with two points for a win, one point for a draw, nil points for a loss. The winner of each group advanced to the semi-finals.

Paraguay qualified automatically as holders for the semifinal.

Group A

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 430174+36
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 421182+65
Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela 4013110−91
Uruguay  Flag of Uruguay.svg2–1Flag of Chile.svg  Chile
Eduardo Mario Acevedo Soccerball shade.svg 45'
Fernando Morena Soccerball shade.svg 63' (pen.)
Juan Carlos Orellana Soccerball shade.svg 76'

Uruguay  Flag of Uruguay.svg3–0Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela
Wilmar Cabrera Soccerball shade.svg 55'
Fernando Morena Soccerball shade.svg 51' (pen.)
Arsenio Luzardo Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Estadio Centenario, Montevideo
Attendance: 60,000
Referee: Gabriel González (Paraguay)

Chile  Flag of Chile.svg5–0Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela
Oscar Arriaza Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Rodolfo Dubó Soccerball shade.svg 25'
Jorge Aravena Soccerball shade.svg 35', 83'
Rubén Espinoza Soccerball shade.svg 51'
Estadio Nacional, Santiago
Attendance: 20,000
Referee: Enrique Labó (Peru)

Chile  Flag of Chile.svg2–0Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Rodolfo Dubó Soccerball shade.svg 9'
Juan Carlos Letelier Soccerball shade.svg 80'
Estadio Nacional, Santiago
Attendance: 55,000
Referee: Teodoro Nitti (Argentina)

Venezuela  Flag of Venezuela (state).svg1–2Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Pedro Febles Soccerball shade.svg 77' Alberto Santelli Soccerball shade.svg 74'
Carlos Aguilera Soccerball shade.svg 87'
Brígido Iriarte Stadium, Caracas
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Carlos Montalván (Peru)

Venezuela  Flag of Venezuela (state).svg0–0Flag of Chile.svg  Chile
Brígido Iriarte Stadium, Caracas
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Elías Jácome (Ecuador)

Group B

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 421161+55
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 413054+15
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 4022410−62
Ecuador  Flag of Ecuador.svg2–2Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina
Galo Fidean Vásquez Soccerball shade.svg 68'
José Jacinto Vega Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Jorge Luis Burruchaga Soccerball shade.svg 40', 51'
Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa, Quito
Attendance: 50,000
Referee: Gilberto Aristizábal (Colombia)

Ecuador  Flag of Ecuador.svg0–1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Report Roberto Dinamite Soccerball shade.svg 14'
Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa, Quito
Attendance: 50,000
Referee: Alfonso Postigo (Peru)

Argentina  Flag of Argentina.svg1–0Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Ricardo Gareca Soccerball shade.svg 55' Report
Estadio Monumental, Buenos Aires
Attendance: 70,000
Referee: Juan Daniel Cardellino (Uruguay)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg5–0Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Renato Gaúcho Soccerball shade.svg 12'
Roberto Dinamite Soccerball shade.svg 46', 55'
Éder Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Tita Soccerball shade.svg 60'
Report
Estádio Serra Dourada, Goiânia
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Luis Gregorio Da Rosa (Uruguay)

Argentina  Flag of Argentina.svg2–2Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Víctor Ramos Soccerball shade.svg 50'
Jorge Luis Burruchaga Soccerball shade.svg 90' (pen.)
Lupo Quiñónez Soccerball shade.svg 44'
Hans Maldonado Soccerball shade.svg 90'
Estadio Monumental, Buenos Aires
Attendance: 40,000
Referee: Juan Daniel Cardellino (Uruguay)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg0–0Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina
Report
Maracanã Stadium, Rio de Janeiro
Attendance: 75,000
Referee: Mario Lira (Chile)

Group C

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 422064+26
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 41215504
Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia 402246−22
Bolivia  Flag of Bolivia (state).svg0–1Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia
Didí Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Estadio Hernando Siles, La Paz
Attendance: 40,000
Referee: Gabriel González (Paraguay)

Peru  Flag of Peru (state).svg1–0Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia
Franco Navarro Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 30,000
Referee: José Luis Martínez Bazán (Uruguay)

Bolivia  Flag of Bolivia (state).svg1–1Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru
Erwin Romero Soccerball shade.svg 65' Franco Navarro Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Estadio Hernando Siles, La Paz
Attendance: 37,738 [1]
Referee: Jorge Eduardo Romero (Argentina)

Colombia  Flag of Colombia.svg2–2Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru
Miguel Augusto Prince Soccerball shade.svg 46'
Fernando Fiorillo Soccerball shade.svg 69'
Eduardo Malásquez Soccerball shade.svg 25' (pen.)
Juan Caballero Soccerball shade.svg 85'

Colombia  Flag of Colombia.svg2–2Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia
Didí Soccerball shade.svg 2'
Nolberto Molina Soccerball shade.svg 60' (pen.)
Milton Melgar Soccerball shade.svg 78'
Silvio Rojas Soccerball shade.svg 80'
Estadio El Campín, Bogotá
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: José Vergara (Venezuela)

Peru  Flag of Peru (state).svg2–1Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia
Germán Leguía Soccerball shade.svg 6'
Juan Caballero Soccerball shade.svg 21'
David Paniagua Soccerball shade.svg 46'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 50,000
Referee: Guillermo Budge (Chile)

Semi-finals

Peru  Flag of Peru (state).svg0–1Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Aguilera Soccerball shade.svg 65'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 28,000
Referee: Sergio Vásquez (Chile)
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 1–1Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru
Cabrera Soccerball shade.svg 49' Malásquez Soccerball shade.svg 24'
Estadio Centenario, Montevideo
Attendance: 58,000
Referee: Ithurralde (Argentina)

Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 1–1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Morel Soccerball shade.svg 70' Report Éder Soccerball shade.svg 88'
Defensores del Chaco, Asunción
Attendance: 55,000
Referee: Castro (Chile)
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0–0Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay
Report
Parque de Sabiá, Uberlandia
Attendance: 75,000
Referee: Loustau (Argentina)

NOTE: BRA qualified by lot.

was declared the winner by the drawing of lots.

Final

First leg

Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 2–0Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Francescoli Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Diogo Soccerball shade.svg 80'
Estadio Centenario, Montevideo
Attendance: 65,000
Referee: Ortiz (Paraguay)

Second leg

Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1–1Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Jorginho Soccerball shade.svg 23' Aguilera Soccerball shade.svg 77'
Estádio Fonte Nova, Salvador
Attendance: 95,000
Referee: Edison Pérez (Peru)

Result

 1983 Copa América Champions 
Flag of Uruguay.svg
Uruguay
12th title

Goal scorers

With three goals, Jorge Luis Burruchaga, Roberto Dinamite and Carlos Aguilera are the top scorers in the tournament. In total, 55 goals were scored by 40 different players, with none of them credited as own goal.

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References

  1. Behr, Raúl. "B para creer" (in Spanish). Dechalaca.com. Retrieved 12 October 2012.
  2. Oliver, Guy (1992). The Guinness Record of World Soccer. Guinness publishing. p. 568. ISBN   0-85112-954-4.
  3. Oliver, Guy (1992). The Guinness Record of World Soccer. Guinness publishing. p. 568. ISBN   0-85112-954-4.