1984 Pacific hurricane season

Last updated
1984 Pacific hurricane season
1984 Pacific hurricane season summary.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedMay 17, 1984
Last system dissipatedNovember 8, 1984
Strongest storm
NameDouglas
  Maximum winds145 mph (230 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
  Lowest pressure939 mbar (hPa; 27.73 inHg)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions26
Total storms21
Hurricanes13
Major hurricanes
(Cat. 3+)
7
Total fatalities21
Total damageUnknown
Related articles
Pacific hurricane seasons
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986

The 1984 Pacific hurricane season was a very active season, producing 21 named storms. When Fausto became a tropical storm on July 3, it was the earliest the sixth named storm was named. This record would be tied in 1985 and broken 34 years later. The season produced 26 tropical cyclones, of which 21 developed into named storms; 13 cyclones attained hurricane status, of which three reached major hurricane status. The season officially started on May 15, 1984, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1984, in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1984. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when the vast majority tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The strongest hurricane of the season was Hurricane Douglas, which attained Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale in the open Pacific.

Tropical cyclone Rapidly rotating storm system

A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane, typhoon, tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; while in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as "tropical cyclones" or "severe cyclonic storms".

Tropical cyclones are unofficially ranked on one of five tropical cyclone intensity scales, according to their maximum sustained winds and which tropical cyclone basin(s) they are located in. Only a few scales of classifications are used officially by the meteorological agencies monitoring the tropical cyclones, but some alternative scales also exist, such as accumulated cyclone energy, the Power Dissipation Index, the Integrated Kinetic Energy Index, and the Hurricane Severity Index.

Contents

Only four tropical systems made landfall during the season. In September, Hurricane Norbert took an erratic path before making landfall on Baja California as a tropical storm, bringing flooding rains. Hurricane Odile also made landfall on Mexico during September as a tropical storm, killing 21 at sea and severely damaging crops. Additionally, Hurricanes Genevieve and Polo struck Mexico as tropical depressions. Hurricane Douglas also threatened Hawaii.

Hurricane Norbert (1984) Category 4 Pacific hurricane in 1984

Hurricane Norbert marked the first time a core of a hurricane was fully mapped in three-dimensions. First forming on September 14, 1984 west of the Mexican coast, Norbert gradually intensified, reaching hurricane intensity two days after formation. On September 22, Norbert peaked in strength as a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. While intensifying, Norbert meandered. It moved east, then north, then west, then south, then back towards the east, and finally towards the northeast. After fluctuating in intensity for two more days, Norbert rapidly weakened. It turned towards the northwest and made landfall in southern Baja California Norte as a tropical storm. The combination of Norbert and several other storms left thousands homeless throughout Mexico. The remnants of Hurricane Norbert produced moderate rain over Arizona.

Baja California Federal entity in Mexico

Baja California, officially the Free and Sovereign State of Baja California, is a state in Mexico. It is the northernmost and westernmost of the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. Before becoming a state in 1952, the area was known as the North Territory of Baja California. It has an area of 70,113 km2 (27,071 sq mi), or 3.57% of the land mass of Mexico and comprises the northern half of the Baja California Peninsula, north of the 28th parallel, plus oceanic Guadalupe Island. The mainland portion of the state is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean, on the east by Sonora, the U.S. state of Arizona, and the Gulf of California, and on the south by Baja California Sur. Its northern limit is the U.S. state of California.

Hurricane Odile (1984) Category 2 Pacific hurricane in 1984

Hurricane Odile was the second of three tropical storms to make landfall in Mexico during the 1984 Pacific hurricane season. The fifteenth named storm and twelfth hurricane of the active season, it developed from a tropical disturbance about 185 miles (300 km) south of Acapulco on September 17. Curving towards the northwest, Odile became a Category 1 hurricane on September 19. The tropical cyclone reached its peak intensity with winds of 105 mph (165 km/h) two days later; however, Hurricane Odile began to weaken as moved erratically it encountered less favorable conditions and was downgraded to a tropical storm shortly before making landfall northwest of Zihuatanejo. Over land, the storm rapidly weakened, and dissipated on September 23. The storm caused significant rainfall accumulations of 24.73 inches (628.1 mm) in Southern Mexico, resulting in severe damage to tourism resorts. Flooding from Odile resulted in the evacuation of 7,000 people, 21 deaths, and the damage of about 900 homes.

Seasonal summary

Hurricane Odile (1984)Hurricane Norbert (1984)Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale1984 Pacific hurricane season

There were 18 tropical storms in the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Center’s (EPHC) area of responsibility (AOR) this season. Twelve became hurricanes. Of those, six became major hurricanes by reaching Category 3 intensity or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. In the Central Pacific Hurricane Center’s (CPHC) AOR, there was a major hurricane and two tropical storms. There was one tropical depression that did not strengthen into a storm.

The Eastern Pacific Hurricane Center was formerly the center responsible for forecasting Pacific hurricanes in the eastern north Pacific east of 140°W. It was part of the Weather Bureau Forecast Office San Francisco and was based in Redwood City.

Area of Responsibility (AOR) is a pre-defined geographic region assigned to Combatant commanders of the Unified Command Plan (UCP), that are used to define an area with specific geographic boundaries where they have the authority to plan and conduct operations; for which a force, or component commander bears a certain responsibility. The term may also be used in other countries worldwide but it originated within the United States Armed Forces. This system is designed to allow a single commander to exercise command and control of all military forces in the AOR, regardless of their branch of service.

Central Pacific Hurricane Center

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) of the United States National Weather Service is the official body responsible for tracking and issuing tropical cyclone warnings, watches, advisories, discussions, and statements for the Central Pacific region: from the equator northward, 140°W–180°W, most significantly for Hawai‘i. It is the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) for tropical cyclones in this region, and in this capacity is known as RSMC Honolulu.

The first storm of the season formed on May 17 and the last storm dissipated on November 5, spanning 173 days. While this was much shorter than 1983, it was still two weeks longer than the 10 year average. During the season, there were a total of 1187 storm hours and 1048 hurricane hours, both of which were well above normal. A total of 585 advisories were issued by the EPHC, nearly 200 above normal.

Systems

Tropical Storm Alma

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Alma 1984-05-19 1815Z.png   Alma 1984 track.png
DurationMay 17 – May 21
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min) 

Alma, a short-lived storm, developed from a tropical disturbance that later strengthened into Tropical Depression One-E on May 17. It continued strengthening until May 19, when it strengthened into Tropical Storm Alma, the first tropical cyclone and named storm of the season. Alma hit its peak intensity of a strong tropical storm of 60 mph (95 km/h) later that day. Moving due west, On May 21, it was downgraded into a depression. Later that same day, Alma was declared dissipated as it degenerated into an open trough. [1] [2]

Hurricane Boris

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Boris 1984-05-29 2000Z.png   Boris 1984 track.png
DurationJune 6 – June 29
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min) 

On May 28, a tropical depression formed 345 mi (555 km) south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec. Moving west, the storm was located underneath 88 °F (31 °C) waters. [1] The depression strengthened into a tropical storm the next day. [2] On May 30, Boris strengthened into a hurricane, the first of the season, and reached its peak intensity with 75 mph (121 km/h) winds. [1] The next day the hurricane weakened into a tropical storm and began executing a loop in response to a building ridge. Boris soon weakened to a tropical depression. After traversing cooler waters of 78 °F (26 °C), the depression dissipated into a remnant low on June 5. [1] However, on June 12, its remnants redeveloped into a tropical storm. [1] In response to an upper-level trough, Boris began to move to the north. However the trough weakened and Boris subsequently began moving to the west, over cooler waters, and dissipated on June 18. [1]

Gulf of Tehuantepec

Gulf of Tehuantepec is a large body of water on the Pacific coast of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, southeastern Mexico, at 16°N95°W. Many Pacific hurricanes form in or near this body of water. A strong, gale-force wind called the Tehuano periodically blows out over the waters of the Gulf of Tehuantepec, inducing strong upwelling of nutrient-rich waters which support abundant sea life.

Trough (meteorology) elongated region of low atmospheric pressure

A trough is an elongated (extended) region of relatively low atmospheric pressure, often associated with fronts. Troughs may be at the surface, or aloft, or both under various conditions. Most troughs bring clouds, showers, and a wind shift, particularly following the passage of the trough. This results from convergence or "squeezing" which forces lifting of moist air behind the trough line.

Hurricane Cristina

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Cristina 23 June 1984.jpg   Cristina 1984 track.png
DurationJune 17 – June 26
Peak intensity105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min) 

Hurricane Cristina formed from a tropical disturbance 345 mi (555 km) southwest of Acapulco on June 17. Moving west due to a combination of a weak westerly-moving upper-level low and a subtropical ridge, the storm intensified into a tropical storm on the same day. Cristina continued to gradually intensify before reaching peak intensity with 105 mph (170 km/h) winds on June 19, a mid-level Category 2 hurricane. The hurricane began moving to the northwest in response to a high-pressure area and weakened into a tropical storm on June 22. Cristina intensified to become a hurricane for a second time on June 24. [2] Cristina eventually dissipated June 26 [1] after bring high clouds to the Baja California Peninsula for a few days. [3]

High-pressure area region where the atmospheric pressure at the surface of the planet is greater than its surrounding environment

A high-pressure area, high or anticyclone is a region where the atmospheric pressure at the surface of the planet is greater than its surrounding environment.

Baja California Peninsula peninsula of North America on the Pacific Coast of Mexico

The Baja California Peninsula is a peninsula in Northwestern Mexico. It separates the Pacific Ocean from the Gulf of California. The peninsula extends 1,247 km from Mexicali, Baja California in the north to Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur in the south. It ranges from 40 km at its narrowest to 320 km at its widest point and has approximately 3,000 km of coastline and approximately 65 islands. The total area of the Baja California Peninsula is 143,390 km2 (55,360 sq mi).

Hurricane Douglas

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Douglas Jun 28 1984 1815Z.jpg   Douglas 1984 track.png
DurationJune 25 – July 6
Peak intensity145 mph (230 km/h) (1-min)  939  mbar  (hPa)

A disturbance off the coast of Mexico had no significant convection until June 25, when it strengthened into Tropical Depression Four-E. As it strengthened into a tropical storm, it received the name Douglas. It strengthened into a hurricane the next day. It hit its peak intensity of a Category Four on the SSHS on June 28. The next day, Douglas weakened into a category 3, then a category 2 late the same day. It later weakened into a tropical storm on July 5, then on July 6, the storm met its demise as it dissipated. Douglas was the strongest storm of the season. Its remnants brought rain to Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii.

Hurricane Elida

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Elida 1984-06-30 2045Z.png   Elida 1984 track.png
DurationJune 28 – July 9
Peak intensity130 mph (215 km/h) (1-min) 

A tropical disturbance developed roughly 350 mi (565 km) south of Salina Cruz. Several hundred miles southwest of Acapulco, the disturbance was upgraded into a tropical depression on June 28. Moving northwestward, the depression was upgraded into Tropical Storm Elida 24 hours later. Rapidly intensifying, Elida eventually peaked as a powerful category 4 hurricane. Shortly after its peak, Elida moved over 76 °F (24 °C) waters as its motion slowed. Hurricane Elida later began to turn southwest, then south, and then east as it interacted with Hurricane Fausto and Genevieve. By that time, Elida was only a tropical depression. On July 9, Elida dissipated as a tropical cyclone.

Tropical Depression Six-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Tropical Depression Six-E 1984.jpg  
DurationJune 30 – July 2
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 

This tropical depression failed to develop.

Hurricane Fausto

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Fausto 4 July 1984.jpg   Fausto 1984 track.png
DurationJuly 3 – July 10
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min) 

A weak tropical disturbance entered the Pacific on July 1. Moving over a pocket of 90 °F (32 °C) waters, it rapidly intensified into a tropical storm on July 3. Fausto slowly turned northwest into an area between two strong troughs. Late on July 8, Fausto reached hurricane intensity. Continuing to rapidly intensify, Fuasto attained peak intensity of 110 mph (175 km/h) 686 km (426 mi) south of La Paz. Hurricane Fuasto continued to move northwest, weakening as it encountered progressively cooler waters. During the afternoon of July 8, the EPHC downgraded Fausto into a tropical storm. Fuasto turned west on July 9 in response to a ridge north of the cyclone. Shortly thereafter, Fuasto was downgraded into a tropical depression, and the system dissipated the next day. [1] Fausto brought high clouds to southern Baja California Sur for four days. [3]

Hurricane Genevieve

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Genevieve 1984-07-10 2015Z.png   Genevieve 1984 track.png
DurationJuly 7 – July 14
Peak intensity115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min) 

Genevieve was a major hurricane that moved northwestward off the west coast of Mexico, existing from July 714, when it dissipated over the southern Baja California peninsula.

Tropical Depression Nine-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Tropical Depression Nine-E 1984.jpg  
DurationJuly 24 – July 25
Peak intensity30 mph (45 km/h) (1-min) 

This tropical depression moved north-northwest out of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ).

Tropical Storm Hernan

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Hernan 28 July 1984.jpg   Hernan 1984 track.png
DurationJuly 27 – August 1
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min) 

Hernan was a short-lived and weak tropical storm which had no effects on land.

Hurricane Iselle

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Iselle 1984-08-08 2230Z.png   Iselle 1984 track.png
DurationAugust 3 – August 12
Peak intensity130 mph (215 km/h) (1-min) 

Iselle was a powerful category 4 hurricane, but the storm never affected any land.

Tropical Storm Julio

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Julio 15 August 1984.jpg   Julio 1984 track.png
DurationAugust 15 – August 20
Peak intensity65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min) 

Julio was a storm which did not have any impacts on land.

Hurricane Keli

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Keli 20 August 1984.jpg   Keli 1984 track.png
DurationAugust 16 – August 22
Peak intensity115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min) 

Hurricane Keli was a major hurricane that threatened Johnston Atoll enough to prompt an evacuation. However, intense shear disintegrated the cyclone. There was no damage.

Tropical Storm Kenna

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Kenna 1984-08-18 1830Z.png   Kenna 1984 track.png
DurationAugust 16 – August 21
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min) 

Kenna was a weak tropical storm which did not affect land.

Tropical Storm Lala

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Lala 1984-08-30 0000Z.png   Lala 1984 track.png
DurationAugust 23 – September 2
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min) 

Tropical Depression Fourteen-E crossed the 140 longitude, and became Tropical Storm Lala. Lala, along with Iniki of 1992, Li of 1994, Lana of 2009, Ela of 2015 & Ulika of 2016 are the only six Tropical Storms to be named in the Central Pacific, but form in the Eastern Pacific.

Hurricane Lowell

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Lowell 26 August 1984.jpg   Lowell 1984 track.png
DurationAugust 26 – August 30
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min) 

Lowell was a hurricane that did not impact land.

Tropical Storm Moke

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Moke 4 September 1984.jpg   Moke 1984 track.png
DurationSeptember 3 (Entered basin) – September 5
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min) 

Moke had uncertain beginnings, as it developed from a cold-core low that eventually became a tropical storm just east of the dateline. It passed close to Kure Atoll, encountered shear, and lost tropical characteristics.

Hurricane Marie

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Marie 1984-09-07 1800Z.png   Marie 1984 track.png
DurationSeptember 5 – September 11
Peak intensity90 mph (150 km/h) (1-min) 

Hurricane Marie dissipated off the coast of Baja California. Its remnants recurved and brought minor levels of rain to California.

Tropical Depression Seventeen-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north.svg  
DurationSeptember 11 – September 12
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 

This tropical depression formed in the Gulf of Tehuantepec.

Tropical Depression Eighteen-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Tropical Storm Edouard (1984).JPG  
DurationSeptember 14 – September 15
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 

This tropical depression formed along the coast near Zihuatanejo, Mexico from the remnants of the Atlantic tropical storm Edouard.

Hurricane Norbert

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Norbert Sep 20 1984 1745Z.jpg   Norbert 1984 track.png
DurationSeptember 14 – September 26
Peak intensity130 mph (215 km/h) (1-min) 

A tropical depression first developed on September 14 over the Pacific Ocean west of the Mexican coast. Six hours later, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Norbert. Norbert reached hurricane status on September 16, and shortly thereafter Norbert became a hurricane. On September 17, Norbert was upgraded to a major hurricane (Category 3 or higher). Meanwhile, Norbert meandered. [2] At 0000 UTC, September 21, Norbert reached its peak intensity of 135 mph (217 km/h). Shortly after its peak, Hurricane Norbert began to turn to the northwest. [1]

Norbert fluctuated in intensity over the next few days. [2] On September 23, a Hurricane Hunter aircraft intercepted Norbert, [1] marking the first time that the core of a hurricane was completely mapped in 3-D. The aircraft was also equipped with Doppler weather radar. [4] Although the hurricane's motion accelerated, by September 25, Norbert was only a Category 2 hurricane. [2] After weakening back into a tropical storm early on September 26 and subsequently ashore near Point Abreojos in the central portion of the Baja California Peninsula while a high-end tropical storm. Norbert eventually became one of the eight tropical cyclones to survive into Arizona. [5]

Described as "big and ugly" by meteorologists, [6] a combination of Norbert and several other storms left many people without a home and hotels nearly empty. [7] Scattered and light rainfall fell across portions of Baja California Norte and Sonora [8] Sustained winds of 20 to 30 mph (30 to 50 km/h) were recorded in the Tucson metropolitan area, but only moderate rainfall occurred throughout south-central to northeast Arizona. [9]

Hurricane Odile

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Odile Sep 21 1984 2000Z.jpg   Odile 1984 track.png
DurationSeptember 17 – September 23
Peak intensity105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min) 

A tropical disturbance was noted about 150 mi (240 km) south of Acapulco on September 16 and was classified as a tropical depression the next day. About 24 hours after developing into a tropical cyclone, the depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm Odile. By the afternoon of September 19, Odile became a hurricane while meandering south of the Mexican coast. [1]

Late on September 21, Hurricane Odile reached its peak intensity of 105 mph (165 km/h). While maintaining peak intensity for a half of a day, the cyclone began to turn more northwestward and weaken over cooler waters. [1] The hurricane weakened to tropical storm status while approaching the coast of Mexico. By late on September 22, Odile made landfall about 50 miles (80 km) northwest of Zihuatanejo, as a weak tropical storm, with winds of 50 mph (80 km/h). Less than six hours later, Odile became an extratropical cyclone, which was at 0000 UTC on September 23. The remnants of Odile moved northwest to the east of Manzanillo before weakening as it re-curved towards Texas. [1] [10]

Heavy rainfall was recorded across Southern Mexico, with the maximum rainfall totals in Costa Azul and Acapulco,. [10] Due to an extended period of heavy rainfall, flooding resulted in damage to about 900 homes, inundation of about 30 miles (48 km) of highways, triggered an evacuation of 7,000 people, and left 20,000 families without any water service. [11] About eighty percent of the crops in the state of Guerrero were damaged. Commercial flights in Acapulco were suspended for two daybecuase airline terminal was flooded by more than 3 ft (910 mm) of water. In addition, Hurricane Odile knocked down two high-tension towers. [11] Overall, the hurricane killed 40 people, and hundreds more were missing, [12] and left thousands homeless. [11]

Hurricane Polo

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Polo 1984-10-01 1800Z.png   Polo 1984 track.png
DurationSeptember 26 – October 3
Peak intensity115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min) 

As a tropical depression, Polo made landfall in the extreme southern part of the Baja California Peninsula on October 3.

Tropical Storm Rachel

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Rachel 10 October 1984.jpg   Rachel 1984 track.png
DurationOctober 7 – October 16
Peak intensity65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min) 

A tropical depression formed on October 7, several hundred miles south of Mexico. It was upgraded to Tropical Storm Rachel on October 9, as it continued westward into the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. Rachel was downgraded to a tropical depression on October 11, as it began to turn northwest. The depression then dissipated in open waters on October 16.

Tropical Storm Simon

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Simon 1 November 1984.jpg   Simon 1984 track.png
DurationOctober 31 – November 8
Peak intensity65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min) 

Simon was a moderately strong tropical storm which did not affect land.

Tropical Depression Twenty-Four-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north.svg  
DurationNovember 5 – November 5
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 

This tropical depression quickly formed and dissipated over cool water.

Season effects

NameDates active Peak classification Peak 1 - minute
sustained winds
Land areas affectedDamage
(USD)
DeathsRefs
AlmaMay 17 – 21Tropical Storm60 mph (95 km/h)NoneNoneNone
BorisMay 28 – June 18Category 1 hurricane75 mph (120 km/h)NoneNoneNone
CristinaJune 17 – 26Category 2 hurricane105 mph (165 km/h)NoneNoneNone
DouglasJune 25 – July 6Category 4 hurricane145 mph (230 km/h)HawaiiNoneNone
ElidaJune 28 – July 8Category 4 hurricane130 mph (215 km/h)NoneNoneNone
SixJune 30 – July 2Tropical depression35 mph (55 km/h)NoneNoneNone
FaustoJuly 3 – 10Category 2 hurricane110 mph (175 km/h)Baja California SurNoneNone
GenevieveJuly 7 – 14Category 3 hurricane115 mph (185 km/h)Baja California SurNoneNone
Nine-EJuly 24 – 25Tropical depression35 mph (55 km/h)NoneNoneNone
HernanJuly 27 – August 1Tropical Storm50 mph (85 km/h)NoneNoneNone
IselleAugust 3 – 12Category 4 hurricane130 mph (215 km/h)NoneNoneNone
JulioAugust 15 – 20Tropical Storm65 mph (100 km/h)NoneNoneNone
KeliAugust 16 – 22Category 3 hurricane115 mph (185 km/h)NoneNoneNone
KennaAugust 16 – 21Tropical Storm60 mph (95 km/h)NoneNoneNone
LalaAugust 23 – September 2Tropical Storm50 mph (85 km/h)NoneNoneNone
LowellAugust 26 – 30Category 1 hurricane85 mph (140 km/h)NoneNoneNone
MokeSeptember 4 – 5Tropical Storm50 mph (85 km/h)NoneNoneNone
MarieSeptember 5 – 11Category 1 hurricane90 mph (150 km/h)NoneNoneNone
17September 11 – 12Tropical depression35 mph (55 km/h)NoneNoneNone
18September 14 – 15Tropical depression35 mph (55 km/h)NoneNoneNone
NorbertSeptember 14 – 26Category 4 hurricane130 mph (215 km/h)Baja California Norte, ArizonaMinimalNone
OdileSeptember 17 – 23Category 2 hurricane115 mph (165 km/h)Western MexicoMinimal21
PoloSeptember 26 –October 3Category 3 hurricane115 mph (185 km/h)Baja California SurNoneNone
RachelOctober 7 – 16Tropical Storm65 mph (100 km/h)NoneNoneNone
SimonOctober 31 – November 8Tropical Storm65 mph (100 km/h)NoneNoneNone
24November 5Tropical depression35 mph (55 km/h)NoneNoneNone
Season Aggregates
26 systemsMay 17 – November 5145 mph (230 km/h)

Storm names

The following names were used for named storms that formed in the eastern Pacific in 1984. This was the first time all of these names were used since the modern lists began. No names were retired, so the list of names was used again in the 1990 season. Names that were not assigned are marked in gray.

  • Alma
  • Boris
  • Cristina
  • Douglas
  • Elida
  • Fausto
  • Genevieve
  • Hernan
  • Iselle
  • Julio
  • Kenna
  • Lowell
  • Marie
  • Norbert
  • Odile
  • Polo
  • Rachel
  • Simon
  • Trudy (unused)
  • Vance (unused)
  • Wallis (unused)

Three names from the Central Pacific list were used - Keli, Lala, and Moke. This was the first usage for all of these names.

  • Keli
  • Lala
  • Moke
  • Nele (unused)

See also

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The 1987 Pacific hurricane season was the last year in which the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Center was the primary warning center for tropical cyclones in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The season officially started May 15, 1987, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1987, in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1987. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when the vast majority of tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

1986 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1986 Pacific hurricane season saw several tropical cyclones contribute to significant flooding to the Central United States. The hurricane season officially started May 15, 1986, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1986 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1986 in both regions. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A total of 17 named storms and 9 hurricanes developed during the season; this is slightly above the averages of 15 named storms and 8 hurricanes, respectively. In addition, 26 tropical depressions formed in the eastern Pacific during 1986, which, at the time, was the second most ever recorded; only the 1982 Pacific hurricane season saw a higher total.

1985 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1985 Pacific hurricane season is the third-most active Pacific hurricane season on record. It officially started on May 15, 1985, in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1985, in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1985. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. At the time, the 1985 season was the most active on record in the eastern north Pacific, with 28 tropical cyclones forming. Of those, 24 were named, 13 reached hurricane intensity, and 8 became major hurricanes by attaining Category 3 status or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. At that time, the 24 named storms was a record; however, this record was broken seven years later in 1992, and was therefore recognized as the second busiest season within the basin, until it was surpassed exactly thirty years later by the 2015 season.

1983 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1983 Pacific hurricane season was the longest season ever recorded at that time, which was later surpassed by the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The 1983 Pacific hurricane season started on May 15, 1983 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1983 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1983. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. During the 1983 season, there were 21 named storms, which was slightly less than the previous season. Furthermore, eight storms reached major hurricane status, or Category 3 or higher on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS). The decaying 1982–83 El Niño event likely contributed to this level of activity. That same El Niño influenced a very quiet Atlantic hurricane season.

1982 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1982 Pacific hurricane season, with 23 named storms, ranks as the fourth-most active Pacific hurricane season on record, tied with 2018. It was at that time the most active season in the basin until it was later surpassed by the 1992 season. It officially started June 1, 1982, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1982, in the central Pacific, and lasted until October 31, 1982, in the central Pacific and until November 15, 1982, in the Eastern Pacific. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. At that time, the season was considered as the most active season within the basin; however, the 1992 season surpassed these numbers a decade later.

1980 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1980 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 1980, in the eastern Pacific and June 1, 1980, in the central Pacific, lasting until November 30, 1980. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern and central Pacific Ocean. This season was relatively uneventful; since no tropical cyclones made landfall, there were no reports of casualties or damage.

1979 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1979 Pacific hurricane season was an inactive Pacific hurricane season. It officially started on May 15, 1979, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1979, in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1979. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

1970 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1970 Pacific hurricane season began on May 15, 1970 in the east Pacific, and on June 1, 1970 in the central Pacific. It ended on November 30, 1970. These dates conventionally delimit the period of time when tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

1968 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1968 Pacific hurricane season ties the record for having the most active August in terms of tropical storms. It officially started on May 15, 1968, in the eastern Pacific and June 1 in the central Pacific and lasted until November 30, 1968. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

2008 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2008 Pacific hurricane season was a near average hurricane season. It officially started May 15, 2008 in the eastern Pacific, started on June 1, 2008 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 2008. This season is the first since 1996 to have no cyclones cross into the central Pacific. Activity this year was near average, with 16 storms forming in the Eastern Pacific proper and an additional 1 in the Central Pacific. There were 7 hurricanes, a low number compared to the typical 9, and only 2 major hurricanes, unlike the typical 5. There were only a few notable storms this year. Tropical Storm Alma made landfall along the Pacific coast of Nicaragua, becoming the first known storm to do so. It killed 9 and did US$35 million in damage. It also became the first tropical storm to be retired in the Eastern Pacific basin. Hurricane Norbert became the strongest hurricane to hit the western side of the Baja Peninsula on record, killing 25.

Hurricane Elida (2002) Category 5 Pacific hurricane in 2002

Hurricane Elida was the first hurricane of the 2002 Pacific hurricane season to reach Category 5 strength on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Forming on July 23 from a tropical wave, the storm rapidly intensified from a tropical depression into a Category 5 hurricane in two days, and lasted for only six hours at that intensity before weakening. It was one of only sixteen known hurricanes in the East Pacific east of the International Date Line to have reached such an intensity. Although heavy waves were able to reach the Mexican coastline, no damages or casualties were reported in relation to the hurricane.

Hurricane Fausto (1996) Category 3 Pacific hurricane in 1996

Hurricane Fausto was a Pacific hurricane that caused light damage to Baja California Sur in September 1996. On September 10, a tropical depression developed a short distance south-southeast of the Mexican Riviera. Slowly intensifying, Fuasto paralleled the coastline. It became a hurricane on September 12, and after briefly reaching major hurricane intensity, increasing wind shear resulted in a weakening trend. It moved ashore Baja California Sur on September 13 as minimal hurricane, and struck the mainland the next day. On September 15, the tropical cyclone was no more. While 15 in (380 mm) of rain was recorded, only one person was killed and damage was light.

Timeline of the 2008 Pacific hurricane season timeline

Below is the Timeline of the 2008 Pacific hurricane season, documenting all the storm formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, as well as dissipation. The 2008 Pacific hurricane season officially began on May 15, 2008, and ended on November 30. For convenience and clarity, in the timeline below, all landfalls are bolded. The timeline will also include information, when it becomes available, which was not operationally released, meaning that information from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as information on a storm that was not operationally warned on, have been included.

Timeline of the 1990 Pacific hurricane season

The 1990 Pacific hurricane season saw a then-record 16 hurricanes form. Throughout the year, 21 tropical cyclones became named storms in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Hurricane Alma formed on May 12, 1990, three days before the season's official start on May 15. The Central Pacific hurricane season began on June 1, covering tropical cyclone formation in the region between 140°W and International Dateline. Hurricane Trudy was the last storm to dissipate, doing so on November 1, nearly a month before the Pacific hurricane season officially ended on November 30.

References

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