1984 Western Australian daylight saving referendum

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A referendum was held on 7 April 1984 in the Australian state of Western Australia on the topic of introducing daylight saving. It was the second of four such proposals which have been put to Western Australian voters, and followed a trial over the 1983–1984 summer. The referendum failed to pass, with a 54.35% majority voting against the proposal.

Referendum results

Question:Are you in favour of the standard time in the State being advanced one hour from the last Sunday in October in each year until the first Sunday in March the following year?

Trial PeriodReferendum DateOutcome
30 October 1983 - 4 March 19847 April 1984REJECTED
YESNO
45.65%54.35%

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