1985 NFL season

Last updated

1985 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 8 – December 23, 1985
Playoffs
Start dateDecember 28, 1985
AFC Champions New England Patriots
NFC Champions Chicago Bears
Super Bowl XX
DateJanuary 26, 1986
Site Louisiana Superdome, New Orleans, Louisiana
Champions Chicago Bears
Pro Bowl
DateFebruary 2, 1986
Site Aloha Stadium
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Colts
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Patriots
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Bills
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Dolphins
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Jets
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Bengals
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Browns
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Oilers
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Steelers
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Broncos
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Chiefs
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Raiders
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Chargers
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Seahawks
AFC teams: Yellow ffff00 pog.svg West, DeepPink pog.svg Central, Green pog.svg East
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Cowboys
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Giants
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Eagles
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Cardinals
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Redskins
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Bears
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Lions
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Packers
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Vikings
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Buccaneers
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Falcons
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Rams
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Saints
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49ers
NFC teams: Yellow ffff00 pog.svg West, DeepPink pog.svg Central, Green pog.svg East

The 1985 NFL season was the 66th regular season of the National Football League. The season ended with Super Bowl XX when the Chicago Bears defeated the New England Patriots 46–10 at the Louisiana Superdome. The Bears became the second team in NFL history (after the previous season's San Francisco 49ers) to win 15 games in the regular season and 18 including the playoffs.

Contents

Player movement

Transactions

Retirements

Draft

The 1985 NFL Draft was held from April 30 to May 1, 1985, at New York City's Omni Park Central Hotel. With the first pick, the Buffalo Bills selected defensive end Bruce Smith from Virginia Tech.

Major rule changes

The Bears making a rushing play in the end zone against the Patriots during Super Bowl XX. 1986 Jeno's Pizza - 11 - Jim McMahon.jpg
The Bears making a rushing play in the end zone against the Patriots during Super Bowl XX.

1985 deaths

Regular season

Scheduling formula

    Inter-conference
AFC East vs NFC Central
AFC Central vs NFC East
AFC West vs NFC West

Highlights of the 1985 season included:

Final standings

Tiebreakers

Rams' running back Dickerson (29) rushing the ball through the Cowboys' defense in the 1985-86 NFC Divisional Playoffs Game . 1986 Jeno's Pizza - 23 - Eric Dickerson and Barry Redden.jpg
Rams' running back Dickerson (29) rushing the ball through the Cowboys' defense in the 1985-86 NFC Divisional Playoffs Game .

Playoffs

Jan 4 – Anaheim Stadium
3 Dallas 0
Dec 29 – Giants Stadium Jan 12 – Soldier Field
2 LA Rams 20
NFC
5 San Francisco 32LA Rams0
Jan 5 – Soldier Field
4 NY Giants 171Chicago24
NFC Championship
4NY Giants0
Jan 26 – Louisiana Superdome
1 Chicago 21
Divisional playoffs
Wild Card playoffsN1Chicago46
Jan 5 – Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
A5New England10
Super Bowl XX
5New England27
Dec 28 – Giants StadiumJan 12 – Miami Orange Bowl
1 LA Raiders 20
AFC
5 New England 265New England31
Jan 4 – Miami Orange Bowl
4 NY Jets 142Miami14
AFC Championship
3 Cleveland 21
2 Miami 24

Milestones

The following players set all-time records during the season:

Most kick return yards, season Buster Rhymes, Minnesota (1,345)
Most punt return yards, season Fulton Walker, Miami / Los Angeles Raiders (692)

Statistical leaders

Team

Points scoredSan Diego Chargers (467)
Total yards gainedSan Diego Chargers (6,535)
Yards rushingChicago Bears (2,761)
Yards passingSan Diego Chargers (4,870)
Fewest points allowedChicago Bears (198)
Fewest total yards allowedChicago Bears (4,315)
Fewest rushing yards allowedChicago Bears (1,319)
Fewest passing yards allowedWashington Redskins (2,746)

Individual

Scoring Kevin Butler, Chicago Bears (151 points)
Touchdowns Joe Morris, New York Giants (21 TDs)
Most field goals made Gary Anderson, Pittsburgh Steelers (33 FGs)
Rushing attempts Gerald Riggs, Atlanta Falcons (397)
Rushing yards Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders (1,759 yards)
Rushing touchdowns Joe Morris, New York Giants (21 TDs)
Passes completed Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins (336)
Pass attempts John Elway, Denver Broncos (605)
Passing yards Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins (4,137 yards)
Passer rating Ken O'Brien, New York Jets (96.2 rating)
Passing touchdowns Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins (30 TDs)
Pass receiving Roger Craig, San Francisco 49ers (92 catches)
Pass receiving yards Steve Largent, Seattle Seahawks (1,287 yards)
Receiving touchdowns Daryl Turner, Seattle Seahawks (13 TDs)
Punt returns Irving Fryar, New England Patriots (14.1 average yards)
Kickoff returns Ron Brown, Los Angeles Rams (32.8 average yards)
Interceptions Everson Walls, Dallas Cowboys (9)
Punting Rohn Stark, Indianapolis Colts (45.9 average yards)
Sacks Richard Dent, Chicago Bears (19.0)

Awards

Most Valuable Player Marcus Allen, running back, LA Raiders
Coach of the Year Mike Ditka, Chicago
Offensive Player of the Year Marcus Allen, running back, LA Raiders
Defensive Player of the Year Mike Singletary, linebacker, Chicago
Offensive Rookie of the Year Eddie Brown, wide receiver, Cincinnati
Defensive Rookie of the Year Duane Bickett, linebacker, Indianapolis
Man of the Year Dwight Stephenson, center, Miami
Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Richard Dent, defensive end, Chicago

Coaching changes

Offseason

In-season

Uniform changes

Television

This was the fourth year under the league's five-year broadcast contracts with ABC, CBS, and NBC to televise Monday Night Football , the NFC package, and the AFC package, respectively. Joe Namath replaced Don Meredith in the MNF booth, joining Frank Gifford and O. J. Simpson. [3]

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References

  1. "Franco Harris, 35, Reluctantly Retires. By Associated Press". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 3, 2020.
  2. "Briefly Noted". The San Bernardino Sun . San Bernardino, California. April 6, 1986. p. 38. Retrieved August 21, 2017 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  3. Brulia, Tim. "A CHRONOLOGY OF PRO FOOTBALL ON TELEVISION: Part 3" (PDF). Pro Football Researchers.