1986 FIFA World Cup qualification

Last updated
1986 FIFA World Cup qualification
Tournament details
Teams121 (from 6 confederations)
Tournament statistics
Matches played308
Goals scored801 (2.6 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Denmark.svg Preben Elkjaer Larsen (8 goals)
1982
1990

A total of 121 teams entered the 1986 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 24 spots in the final tournament. Mexico, as the hosts, and Italy, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 22 spots open for competition. The draw took place on 7 December 1983 at Zürich, Switzerland.

Contents

The 24 spots available in the 1986 World Cup would be distributed among the continental zones as follows:

A total of 110 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 308 qualifying matches were played, and 801 goals were scored (an average of 2.60 per match).

Continental zones

To see the dates and results of the qualification rounds for each continental zone, click on the following articles:

Group 1 – Poland qualified. Belgium advanced to the UEFA play-offs.
Group 2 – West Germany and Portugal qualified.
Group 3 – England and Northern Ireland qualified.
Group 4 – France and Bulgaria qualified.
Group 5 – Hungary qualified. Netherlands advanced to the UEFA play-offs.
Group 6 – Denmark and USSR qualified.
Group 7 – Spain qualified. Scotland advanced to the UEFA–OFC intercontinental play-off.
Play-offs – Belgium qualified over Netherlands.
Group 1 – Argentina qualified. Peru and Colombia advanced to the CONMEBOL play-offs.
Group 2 – Uruguay qualified. Chile advanced to the CONMEBOL play-offs.
Group 3 – Brazil qualified. Paraguay advanced to the CONMEBOL play-offs.
Play-offs – Paraguay qualified over Chile, Colombia and Peru.
Canada qualified.
Algeria and Morocco qualified.
Iraq and Korea Republic qualified.
Australia advanced to the UEFA–OFC intercontinental play-off

Inter-confederation play-offs: UEFA v OFC

The two teams would play against each other on a home-and-away basis. The winner qualified for the 1986 FIFA World Cup.

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg2–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2–0 0–0

Qualified teams

Final qualification status
Country qualified for World Cup
Country failed to qualify
Country did not enter World Cup
Country not a FIFA member 1986 world cup qualification.png
Final qualification status
  Country qualified for World Cup
  Country failed to qualify
  Country did not enter World Cup
  Country not a FIFA member

The following 24 teams qualified for the 1986 FIFA World Cup:

TeamFinals appearanceStreakLast appearance
Flag of Algeria.svg  Algeria 2nd2 1982
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 9th4 1982
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 7th2 1982
Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 13th13 1982
Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 5th1 1974
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1st1
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1st1
Flag of England.svg  England 8th2 1982
Flag of France.svg  France 9th3 1982
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 9th3 1982
Flag of Iraq (1963-1991); Flag of Syria (1963-1972).svg  Iraq 1st1
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy (c)11th7 1982
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 2nd1 1954
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico (h)9th1 1978
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 2nd1 1970
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 3rd2 1982
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 4th1 1958
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 5th4 1982
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 2nd1 1966
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 6th4 1982
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 7th3 1982
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 8th1 1974
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 6th2 1982
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 11th9 1982

(h) – qualified automatically as hosts

(c) – qualified automatically as defending champions

12 of the 24 teams subsequently failed to qualify for the 1990 finals: Algeria, Bulgaria, Canada, Denmark, France, Hungary, Iraq, Morocco, Northern Ireland, Paraguay, Poland and Portugal. Mexico would be banned from competing in the 1990 finals due to the Cachirules scandal, bringing the total number of teams who did not qualify for the subsequent tournament to 13.

Top goalscorers

8 goals
7 goals
6 goals
5 goals

Notes

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